Matching Items (21)

Simulation models for programmable metallization cells

Description

Advances in software and applications continue to demand advances in memory. The ideal memory would be non-volatile and have maximal capacity, speed, retention time, endurance, and radiation hardness while also

Advances in software and applications continue to demand advances in memory. The ideal memory would be non-volatile and have maximal capacity, speed, retention time, endurance, and radiation hardness while also having minimal physical size, energy usage, and cost. The programmable metallization cell (PMC) is an emerging memory technology that is likely to surpass flash memory in all the listed ideal memory characteristics. A comprehensive physics-based model is needed to fully understand PMC operation and aid in design optimization. With the intent of advancing the PMC modeling effort, this thesis presents two simulation models for the PMC. The first model is a finite element model based on Silvaco Atlas finite element analysis software. Limitations of the software are identified that make this model inconsistent with the operating mechanism of the PMC. The second model is a physics-based numerical model developed for the PMC. This model is successful in matching data measured from a chalcogenide glass PMC designed and manufactured at ASU. Matched operating characteristics observable in the current and resistance vs. voltage data include the OFF/ON resistances and write/erase and electrodeposition voltage thresholds. Multilevel programming is also explained and demonstrated with the numerical model. The numerical model has already proven useful by revealing some information presented about the operation and characteristics of the PMC.

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Date Created
  • 2013

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Static behavior of chalcogenide based programmable metallization cells

Description

Nonvolatile memory (NVM) technologies have been an integral part of electronic systems for the past 30 years. The ideal non-volatile memory have minimal physical size, energy usage, and cost while

Nonvolatile memory (NVM) technologies have been an integral part of electronic systems for the past 30 years. The ideal non-volatile memory have minimal physical size, energy usage, and cost while having maximal speed, capacity, retention time, and radiation hardness. A promising candidate for next-generation memory is ion-conducting bridging RAM which is referred to as programmable metallization cell (PMC), conductive bridge RAM (CBRAM), or electrochemical metallization memory (ECM), which is likely to surpass flash memory in all the ideal memory characteristics. A comprehensive physics-based model is needed to completely understand PMC operation and assist in design optimization.

To advance the PMC modeling effort, this thesis presents a precise physical model parameterizing materials associated with both ion-rich and ion-poor layers of the PMC's solid electrolyte, so that captures the static electrical behavior of the PMC in both its low-resistance on-state (LRS) and high resistance off-state (HRS). The experimental data is measured from a chalcogenide glass PMC designed and manufactured at ASU. The static on- and off-state resistance of a PMC device composed of a layered (Ag-rich/Ag-poor) Ge30Se70 ChG film is characterized and modeled using three dimensional simulation code written in Silvaco Atlas finite element analysis software. Calibrating the model to experimental data enables the extraction of device parameters such as material bandgaps, workfunctions, density of states, carrier mobilities, dielectric constants, and affinities.

The sensitivity of our modeled PMC to the variation of its prominent achieved material parameters is examined on the HRS and LRS impedance behavior.

The obtained accurate set of material parameters for both Ag-rich and Ag-poor ChG systems and process variation verification on electrical characteristics enables greater fidelity in PMC device simulation, which significantly enhances our ability to understand the underlying physics of ChG-based resistive switching memory.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Multidimensional DFT IP generators for FPGA platforms

Description

Multidimensional (MD) discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is a key kernel algorithm in many signal processing applications, such as radar imaging and medical imaging. Traditionally, a two-dimensional (2-D) DFT is computed

Multidimensional (MD) discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is a key kernel algorithm in many signal processing applications, such as radar imaging and medical imaging. Traditionally, a two-dimensional (2-D) DFT is computed using Row-Column (RC) decomposition, where one-dimensional (1-D) DFTs are computed along the rows followed by 1-D DFTs along the columns. However, architectures based on RC decomposition are not efficient for large input size data which have to be stored in external memories based Synchronous Dynamic RAM (SDRAM). In this dissertation, first an efficient architecture to implement 2-D DFT for large-sized input data is proposed. This architecture achieves very high throughput by exploiting the inherent parallelism due to a novel 2-D decomposition and by utilizing the row-wise burst access pattern of the SDRAM external memory. In addition, an automatic IP generator is provided for mapping this architecture onto a reconfigurable platform of Xilinx Virtex-5 devices. For a 2048x2048 input size, the proposed architecture is 1.96 times faster than RC decomposition based implementation under the same memory constraints, and also outperforms other existing implementations. While the proposed 2-D DFT IP can achieve high performance, its output is bit-reversed. For systems where the output is required to be in natural order, use of this DFT IP would result in timing overhead. To solve this problem, a new bandwidth-efficient MD DFT IP that is transpose-free and produces outputs in natural order is proposed. It is based on a novel decomposition algorithm that takes into account the output order, FPGA resources, and the characteristics of off-chip memory access. An IP generator is designed and integrated into an in-house FPGA development platform, AlgoFLEX, for easy verification and fast integration. The corresponding 2-D and 3-D DFT architectures are ported onto the BEE3 board and their performance measured and analyzed. The results shows that the architecture can maintain the maximum memory bandwidth throughout the whole procedure while avoiding matrix transpose operations used in most other MD DFT implementations. The proposed architecture has also been ported onto the Xilinx ML605 board. When clocked at 100 MHz, 2048x2048 images with complex single-precision can be processed in less than 27 ms. Finally, transpose-free imaging flows for range-Doppler algorithm (RDA) and chirp-scaling algorithm (CSA) in SAR imaging are proposed. The corresponding implementations take advantage of the memory access patterns designed for the MD DFT IP and have superior timing performance. The RDA and CSA flows are mapped onto a unified architecture which is implemented on an FPGA platform. When clocked at 100MHz, the RDA and CSA computations with data size 4096x4096 can be completed in 323ms and 162ms, respectively. This implementation outperforms existing SAR image accelerators based on FPGA and GPU.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Programmable metallization cell devices for flexible electronics

Description

Programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology is based on an electrochemical phenomenon in which a metallic electrodeposit can be grown or dissolved between two electrodes depending on the voltage applied between

Programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology is based on an electrochemical phenomenon in which a metallic electrodeposit can be grown or dissolved between two electrodes depending on the voltage applied between them. Devices based on this phenomenon exhibit a unique, self-healing property, as a broken metallic structure can be healed by applying an appropriate voltage between the two broken ends. This work explores methods of fabricating interconnects and switches based on PMC technology on flexible substrates. The objective was the evaluation of the feasibility of using this technology in flexible electronics applications in which reliability is a primary concern. The re-healable property of the interconnect is characterized for the silver doped germanium selenide (Ag-Ge-Se) solid electrolyte system. This property was evaluated by measuring the resistances of the healed interconnect structures and comparing these to the resistances of the unbroken structures. The reliability of the interconnects in both unbroken and healed states is studied by investigating the resistances of the structures to DC voltages, AC voltages and different temperatures as a function of time. This work also explores replacing silver with copper for these interconnects to enhance their reliability. A model for PMC-based switches on flexible substrates is proposed and compared to the observed device behavior with the objective of developing a formal design methodology for these devices. The switches were subjected to voltage sweeps and their resistance was investigated as a function of sweep voltage. The resistance of the switches as a function of voltage pulse magnitude when placed in series with a resistance was also investigated. A model was then developed to explain the behavior of these devices. All observations were based on statistical measurements to account for random errors. The results of this work demonstrate that solid electrolyte based interconnects display self-healing capability, which depends on the applied healing voltage and the current limit. However, they fail at lower current densities than metal interconnects due to an ion-drift induced failure mechanism. The results on the PMC based switches demonstrate that a model comprising a Schottky diode in parallel with a variable resistor predicts the behavior of the device.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Fractal properties and applications of dendritic filaments in programmable metallization cells

Description

Programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology employs the mechanisms of metal ion transport in solid electrolytes (SE) and electrochemical redox reactions in order to form metallic electrodeposits. When a positive bias

Programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology employs the mechanisms of metal ion transport in solid electrolytes (SE) and electrochemical redox reactions in order to form metallic electrodeposits. When a positive bias is applied to an anode opposite to a cathode, atoms at the anode are oxidized to ions and dissolve into the SE. Under the influence of the electric field, the ions move to the cathode and become reduced to form the electrodeposits. These electrodeposits are filamentary in nature and persistent, and since they are metallic can alter the physical characteristics of the material on which they are formed. PMCs can be used as next generation memories, radio frequency (RF) switches and physical unclonable functions (PUFs).

The morphology of the filaments is impacted by the biasing conditions. Under a relatively high applied electric field, they form as dendritic elements with a low fractal dimension (FD), whereas a low electric field leads to high FD features. Ion depletion effects in the SE due to low ion diffusivity/mobility also influences the morphology by limiting the ion supply into the growing electrodeposit.

Ion transport in SE is due to hopping transitions driven by drift and diffusion force. A physical model of ion hopping with Brownian motion has been proposed, in which the ion transitions are random when time window is larger than characteristic time. The random growth process of filaments in PMC adds entropy to the electrodeposition, which leads to random features in the dendritic patterns. Such patterns has extremely high information capacity due to the fractal nature of the electrodeposits.

In this project, lateral-growth PMCs were fabricated, whose LRS resistance is less than 10Ω, which can be used as RF switches. Also, an array of radial-growth PMCs was fabricated, on which multiple dendrites, all with different shapes, could be grown simultaneously. Those patterns can be used as secure keys in PUFs and authentication can be performed by optical scanning.

A kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model is developed to simulate the ion transportation in SE under electric field. The simulation results matched experimental data well that validated the ion hopping model.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Multilevel resistance programming in conductive bridge resistive memory

Description

This work focuses on the existence of multiple resistance states in a type of emerging non-volatile resistive memory device known commonly as Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) or Conductive Bridge Random

This work focuses on the existence of multiple resistance states in a type of emerging non-volatile resistive memory device known commonly as Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) or Conductive Bridge Random Access Memory (CBRAM), which can be important for applications such as multi-bit memory as well as non-volatile logic and neuromorphic computing. First, experimental data from small signal, quasi-static and pulsed mode electrical characterization of such devices are presented which clearly demonstrate the inherent multi-level resistance programmability property in CBRAM devices. A physics based analytical CBRAM compact model is then presented which simulates the ion-transport dynamics and filamentary growth mechanism that causes resistance change in such devices. Simulation results from the model are fitted to experimental dynamic resistance switching characteristics. The model designed using Verilog-a language is computation-efficient and can be integrated with industry standard circuit simulation tools for design and analysis of hybrid circuits involving both CMOS and CBRAM devices. Three main circuit applications for CBRAM devices are explored in this work. Firstly, the susceptibility of CBRAM memory arrays to single event induced upsets is analyzed via compact model simulation and experimental heavy ion testing data that show possibility of both high resistance to low resistance and low resistance to high resistance transitions due to ion strikes. Next, a non-volatile sense amplifier based flip-flop architecture is proposed which can help make leakage power consumption negligible by allowing complete shutdown of power supply while retaining its output data in CBRAM devices. Reliability and energy consumption of the flip-flop circuit for different CBRAM low resistance levels and supply voltage values are analyzed and compared to CMOS designs. Possible extension of this architecture for threshold logic function computation using the CBRAM devices as re-configurable resistive weights is also discussed. Lastly, Spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) based gradual resistance change behavior in CBRAM device fabricated in back-end-of-line on a CMOS die containing integrate and fire CMOS neuron circuits is demonstrated for the first time which indicates the feasibility of using CBRAM devices as electronic synapses in spiking neural network hardware implementations for non-Boolean neuromorphic computing.

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Date Created
  • 2015

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Android application context aware I/O scheduler

Description

Android has been the dominant platform in which most of the mobile development is being done. By the end of the second quarter of 2014, 84.7 percent of the entire

Android has been the dominant platform in which most of the mobile development is being done. By the end of the second quarter of 2014, 84.7 percent of the entire world mobile phones market share had been captured by Android. The Android library internally uses the modified Linux kernel as the part of its stack. The I/O scheduler, is a part of the Linux kernel, responsible for scheduling data requests to the internal and the external memory devices that are attached to the mobile systems.

The usage of solid state drives in the Android tablet has also seen a rise owing to its speed of operation and mechanical stability. The I/O schedulers that exist in the present Linux kernel are not better suited for handling solid state drives in particular to exploit the inherent parallelism offered by the solid state drives. The Android provides information to the Linux kernel about the processes running in the foreground and background. Based on this information the kernel decides the process scheduling and the memory management, but no such information exists for the I/O scheduling. Research shows that the resource management could be done better if the operating system is aware of the characteristics of the requester. Thus, there is a need for a better I/O scheduler that could schedule I/O operations based on the application and also exploit the parallelism in the solid state drives. The scheduler proposed through this research does that. It contains two algorithms working in unison one focusing on the solid state drives and the other on the application awareness.

The Android application context aware scheduler has the features of increasing the responsiveness of the time sensitive applications and also increases the throughput by parallel scheduling of request in the solid state drive. The suggested scheduler is tested using standard benchmarks and real-time scenarios, the results convey that our scheduler outperforms the existing default completely fair queuing scheduler of the Android.

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Date Created
  • 2014

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WCET-aware scratchpad memory management for hard real-time systems

Description

Cyber-physical systems and hard real-time systems have strict timing constraints that specify deadlines until which tasks must finish their execution. Missing a deadline can cause unexpected outcome or endanger human

Cyber-physical systems and hard real-time systems have strict timing constraints that specify deadlines until which tasks must finish their execution. Missing a deadline can cause unexpected outcome or endanger human lives in safety-critical applications, such as automotive or aeronautical systems. It is, therefore, of utmost importance to obtain and optimize a safe upper bound of each task’s execution time or the worst-case execution time (WCET), to guarantee the absence of any missed deadline. Unfortunately, conventional microarchitectural components, such as caches and branch predictors, are only optimized for average-case performance and often make WCET analysis complicated and pessimistic. Caches especially have a large impact on the worst-case performance due to expensive off- chip memory accesses involved in cache miss handling. In this regard, software-controlled scratchpad memories (SPMs) have become a promising alternative to caches. An SPM is a raw SRAM, controlled only by executing data movement instructions explicitly at runtime, and such explicit control facilitates static analyses to obtain safe and tight upper bounds of WCETs. SPM management techniques, used in compilers targeting an SPM-based processor, determine how to use a given SPM space by deciding where to insert data movement instructions and what operations to perform at those program locations. This dissertation presents several management techniques for program code and stack data, which aim to optimize the WCETs of a given program. The proposed code management techniques include optimal allocation algorithms and a polynomial-time heuristic for allocating functions to the SPM space, with or without the use of abstraction of SPM regions, and a heuristic for splitting functions into smaller partitions. The proposed stack data management technique, on the other hand, finds an optimal set of program locations to evict and restore stack frames to avoid stack overflows, when the call stack resides in a size-limited SPM. In the evaluation, the WCETs of various benchmarks including real-world automotive applications are statically calculated for SPMs and caches in several different memory configurations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Analysis and design of native file system enhancements for storage class memory

Description

As persistent non-volatile memory solutions become integrated in the computing ecosystem and landscape, traditional commodity file systems architected and developed for traditional block I/O based memory solutions must be reevaluated.

As persistent non-volatile memory solutions become integrated in the computing ecosystem and landscape, traditional commodity file systems architected and developed for traditional block I/O based memory solutions must be reevaluated. A majority of commodity file systems have been architected and designed with the goal of managing data on non-volatile storage devices such as hard disk drives (HDDs) and solid state drives (SSDs). HDDs and SSDs are attached to a computing system via a controller or I/O hub, often referred to as the southbridge. The point of HDD and SSD attachment creates multiple levels of translation for any data managed by the CPU that must be stored in non-volatile memory (NVM) on an HDD or SSD. Storage Class Memory (SCM) devices provide the ability to store data at the CPU and DRAM level of a computing system. A novel set of modifications to the ext2 and ext4 commodity file systems to address the needs of SCM will be presented and discussed. An in-depth analysis of many existing file systems, from multiple sources, will be presented along with an analysis to identify key modifications and extensions that would be necessary to execute file system on SCM devices. From this analysis, modifications and extensions have been applied to the FAT commodity file system for key functional tests that will be presented to demonstrate the operation and execution of the file system extensions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Memory interference characterization and mitigation for heterogeneous smartphones

Description

The availability of a wide range of general purpose as well as accelerator cores on

modern smartphones means that a significant number of applications can be executed

on a smartphone simultaneously, resulting

The availability of a wide range of general purpose as well as accelerator cores on

modern smartphones means that a significant number of applications can be executed

on a smartphone simultaneously, resulting in an ever increasing demand on the memory

subsystem. While the increased computation capability is intended for improving

user experience, memory requests from each concurrent application exhibit unique

memory access patterns as well as specific timing constraints. If not considered, this

could lead to significant memory contention and result in lowered user experience.

This work first analyzes the impact of memory degradation caused by the interference

at the memory system for a broad range of commonly-used smartphone applications.

The real system characterization results show that smartphone applications,

such as web browsing and media playback, suffer significant performance degradation.

This is caused by shared resource contention at the application processor’s last-level

cache, the communication fabric, and the main memory.

Based on the detailed characterization results, rest of this thesis focuses on the

design of an effective memory interference mitigation technique. Since web browsing,

being one of the most commonly-used smartphone applications and represents many

html-based smartphone applications, my thesis focuses on meeting the performance

requirement of a web browser on a smartphone in the presence of background processes

and co-scheduled applications. My thesis proposes a light-weight user space frequency

governor to mitigate the degradation caused by interfering applications, by predicting

the performance and power consumption of web browsing. The governor selects an

optimal energy-efficient frequency setting periodically by using the statically-trained

performance and power models with dynamically-varying architecture and system

conditions, such as the memory access intensity of background processes and/or coscheduled applications, and temperature of cores. The governor has been extensively evaluated on a Nexus 5 smartphone over a diverse range of mobile workloads. By

operating at the most energy-efficient frequency setting in the presence of interference,

energy efficiency is improved by as much as 35% and with an average of 18% compared

to the existing interactive governor, while maintaining the satisfactory performance

of web page loading under 3 seconds.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016