Matching Items (19)

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One-dimensional fast transient simulator for modeling CdS/CdTe solar cells

Description

Solar energy, including solar heating, solar architecture, solar thermal electricity and solar photovoltaics, is one of the primary energy sources replacing fossil fuels. Being one of the most important techniques, significant research has been conducted in solar cell efficiency improvement.

Solar energy, including solar heating, solar architecture, solar thermal electricity and solar photovoltaics, is one of the primary energy sources replacing fossil fuels. Being one of the most important techniques, significant research has been conducted in solar cell efficiency improvement. Simulation of various structures and materials of solar cells provides a deeper understanding of device operation and ways to improve their efficiency. Over the last two decades, polycrystalline thin-film Cadmium-Sulfide and Cadmium-Telluride (CdS/CdTe) solar cells fabricated on glass substrates have been considered as one of the most promising candidate in the photovoltaic technologies, for their similar efficiency and low costs when compared to traditional silicon-based solar cells. In this work a fast one dimensional time-dependent/steady-state drift-diffusion simulator, accelerated by adaptive non-uniform mesh and automatic time-step control, for modeling solar cells has been developed and has been used to simulate a CdS/CdTe solar cell. These models are used to reproduce transients of carrier transport in response to step-function signals of different bias and varied light intensity. The time-step control models are also used to help convergence in steady-state simulations where constrained material constants, such as carrier lifetimes in the order of nanosecond and carrier mobility in the order of 100 cm2/Vs, must be applied.

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Date Created
2013

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Influence of embedded HVDC transmission on AC network performance

Description

An embedded HVDC system is a dc link with at least two ends being physically connected within a single synchronous ac network. The thesis reviews previous works on embedded HVDC, proposes a dynamic embedded HVDC model by PSCAD program, and

An embedded HVDC system is a dc link with at least two ends being physically connected within a single synchronous ac network. The thesis reviews previous works on embedded HVDC, proposes a dynamic embedded HVDC model by PSCAD program, and compares the transient stability performance among AC, DC and embedded HVDC. The test results indicate that by installing the embedded HVDC, AC network transient stability performance has been largely improved. Therefore the thesis designs a novel frequency control topology for embedded HVDC. According to the dynamic performance test results, when the embedded HVDC system equipped with a frequency control, the system transient stability will be improved further.

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Date Created
2013

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Analysis of synchronization and accuracy of synchrophasor measurements

Description

In electric power systems, phasor measurement units (PMUs) are capable of providing synchronized voltage and current phasor measurements which are superior to conventional measurements collected by the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system in terms of resolution and accuracy.

In electric power systems, phasor measurement units (PMUs) are capable of providing synchronized voltage and current phasor measurements which are superior to conventional measurements collected by the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system in terms of resolution and accuracy. These measurements are known as synchrophasor measurements. Considerable research work has been done on the applications of PMU measurements based on the as-sumption that a high level of accuracy is obtained in the field. The study in this dissertation is conducted to address the basic issue concerning the accuracy of actual PMU measurements in the field. Synchronization is one of the important features of PMU measurements. However, the study presented in this dissertation reveals that the problem of faulty synchronization between measurements with the same time stamps from different PMUs exists. A Kalman filter model is proposed to analyze and calcu-late the time skew error caused by faulty synchronization. In order to achieve a high level of accuracy of PMU measurements, inno-vative methods are proposed to detect and identify system state changes or bad data which are reflected by changes in the measurements. This procedure is ap-plied as a key step in adaptive Kalman filtering of PMU measurements to over-come the insensitivity of a conventional Kalman filter. Calibration of PMU measurements is implemented in specific PMU instal-lation scenarios using transmission line (TL) parameters from operation planning data. The voltage and current correction factors calculated from the calibration procedure indicate the possible errors in PMU measurements. Correction factors can be applied in on-line calibration of PMU measurements. A study is conducted to address an important issue when integrating PMU measurements into state estimation. The reporting rate of PMU measurements is much higher than that of the measurements collected by the SCADA. The ques-tion of how to buffer PMU measurements is raised. The impact of PMU meas-urement buffer length on state estimation is discussed. A method based on hy-pothesis testing is proposed to determine the optimal buffer length of PMU meas-urements considering the two conflicting features of PMU measurements, i. e. un-certainty and variability. Results are presented for actual PMU synchrophasor measurements.

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Date Created
2012

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Solving for the low-voltage/large-angle power-flow solutions by using the holomorphic embedding method

Description

For a (N+1)-bus power system, possibly 2N solutions exists. One of these solutions

is known as the high-voltage (HV) solution or operable solution. The rest of the solutions

are the low-voltage (LV), or large-angle, solutions.

In this report, a recently developed non-iterative algorithm

For a (N+1)-bus power system, possibly 2N solutions exists. One of these solutions

is known as the high-voltage (HV) solution or operable solution. The rest of the solutions

are the low-voltage (LV), or large-angle, solutions.

In this report, a recently developed non-iterative algorithm for solving the power-

flow (PF) problem using the holomorphic embedding (HE) method is shown as

being capable of finding the HV solution, while avoiding converging to LV solutions

nearby which is a drawback to all other iterative solutions. The HE method provides a

novel non-iterative procedure to solve the PF problems by eliminating the

non-convergence and initial-estimate dependency issues appeared in the traditional

iterative methods. The detailed implementation of the HE method is discussed in the

report.

While published work focuses mainly on finding the HV PF solution, modified

holomorphically embedded formulations are proposed in this report to find the

LV/large-angle solutions of the PF problem. It is theoretically proven that the proposed

method is guaranteed to find a total number of 2N solutions to the PF problem

and if no solution exists, the algorithm is guaranteed to indicate such by the oscillations

in the maximal analytic continuation of the coefficients of the voltage power series

obtained.

After presenting the derivation of the LV/large-angle formulations for both PQ

and PV buses, numerical tests on the five-, seven- and 14-bus systems are conducted

to find all the solutions of the system of nonlinear PF equations for those systems using

the proposed HE method.

After completing the derivation to find all the PF solutions using the HE method, it

is shown that the proposed HE method can be used to find only the of interest PF solutions

(i.e. type-1 PF solutions with one positive real-part eigenvalue in the Jacobian

matrix), with a proper algorithm developed. The closet unstable equilibrium point

(UEP), one of the type-1 UEP’s, can be obtained by the proposed HE method with

limited dynamic models included.

The numerical performance as well as the robustness of the proposed HE method is

investigated and presented by implementing the algorithm on the problematic cases and

large-scale power system.

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Date Created
2015

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Optimal location and sizing of dynamic VArs for fast voltage collapse

Description

Recent changes in the energy markets structure combined with the conti-nuous load growth have caused power systems to be operated under more stressed conditions. In addition, the nature of power systems has also grown more complex and dynamic because of

Recent changes in the energy markets structure combined with the conti-nuous load growth have caused power systems to be operated under more stressed conditions. In addition, the nature of power systems has also grown more complex and dynamic because of the increasing use of long inter-area tie-lines and the high motor loads especially those comprised mainly of residential single phase A/C motors. Therefore, delayed voltage recovery, fast voltage collapse and short term voltage stability issues in general have obtained significant importance in relia-bility studies. Shunt VAr injection has been used as a countermeasure for voltage instability. However, the dynamic and fast nature of short term voltage instability requires fast and sufficient VAr injection, and therefore dynamic VAr devices such as Static VAr Compensators (SVCs) and STATic COMpensators (STAT-COMs) are used. The location and size of such devices are optimized in order to improve their efficiency and reduce initial costs. In this work time domain dy-namic analysis was used to evaluate trajectory voltage sensitivities for each time step. Linear programming was then performed to determine the optimal amount of required VAr injection at each bus, using voltage sensitivities as weighting factors. Optimal VAr injection values from different operating conditions were weighted and averaged in order to obtain a final setting of the VAr requirement. Some buses under consideration were either assigned very small VAr injection values, or not assigned any value at all. Therefore, the approach used in this work was found to be useful in not only determining the optimal size of SVCs, but also their location.

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Created

Date Created
2011

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Improved coherency-based dynamic equivalents

Description

Due to restructuring and open access to the transmission system, modern electric power systems are being operated closer to their operational limits. Additionally, the secure operational limits of modern power systems have become increasingly difficult to evaluate as the scale

Due to restructuring and open access to the transmission system, modern electric power systems are being operated closer to their operational limits. Additionally, the secure operational limits of modern power systems have become increasingly difficult to evaluate as the scale of the network and the number of transactions between utilities increase. To account for these challenges associated with the rapid expansion of electric power systems, dynamic equivalents have been widely applied for the purpose of reducing the computational effort of simulation-based transient security assessment. Dynamic equivalents are commonly developed using a coherency-based approach in which a retained area and an external area are first demarcated. Then the coherent generators in the external area are aggregated and replaced by equivalenced models, followed by network reduction and load aggregation. In this process, an improperly defined retained area can result in detrimental impacts on the effectiveness of the equivalents in preserving the dynamic characteristics of the original unreduced system. In this dissertation, a comprehensive approach has been proposed to determine an appropriate retained area boundary by including the critical generators in the external area that are tightly coupled with the initial retained area. Further-more, a systematic approach has also been investigated to efficiently predict the variation in generator slow coherency behavior when the system operating condition is subject to change. Based on this determination, the critical generators in the external area that are tightly coherent with the generators in the initial retained area are retained, resulting in a new retained area boundary. Finally, a novel hybrid dynamic equivalent, consisting of both a coherency-based equivalent and an artificial neural network (ANN)-based equivalent, has been proposed and analyzed. The ANN-based equivalent complements the coherency-based equivalent at all the retained area boundary buses, and it is designed to compensate for the discrepancy between the full system and the conventional coherency-based equivalent. The approaches developed have been validated on a large portion of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) system and on a test case including a significant portion of the eastern interconnection.

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Date Created
2011

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Trajectory sensitivity based power system dynamic security assessment

Description

Contemporary methods for dynamic security assessment (DSA) mainly re-ly on time domain simulations to explore the influence of large disturbances in a power system. These methods are computationally intensive especially when the system operating point changes continually. The trajectory sensitivity

Contemporary methods for dynamic security assessment (DSA) mainly re-ly on time domain simulations to explore the influence of large disturbances in a power system. These methods are computationally intensive especially when the system operating point changes continually. The trajectory sensitivity method, when implemented and utilized as a complement to the existing DSA time domain simulation routine, can provide valuable insights into the system variation in re-sponse to system parameter changes. The implementation of the trajectory sensitivity analysis is based on an open source power system analysis toolbox called PSAT. Eight categories of sen-sitivity elements have been implemented and tested. The accuracy assessment of the implementation demonstrates the validity of both the theory and the imple-mentation. The computational burden introduced by the additional sensitivity equa-tions is relieved by two innovative methods: one is by employing a cluster to per-form the sensitivity calculations in parallel; the other one is by developing a mod-ified very dishonest Newton method in conjunction with the latest sparse matrix processing technology. The relation between the linear approximation accuracy and the perturba-tion size is also studied numerically. It is found that there is a fixed connection between the linear approximation accuracy and the perturbation size. Therefore this finding can serve as a general application guide to evaluate the accuracy of the linear approximation. The applicability of the trajectory sensitivity approach to a large realistic network has been demonstrated in detail. This research work applies the trajectory sensitivity analysis method to the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) system. Several typical power system dynamic security problems, in-cluding the transient angle stability problem, the voltage stability problem consid-ering load modeling uncertainty and the transient stability constrained interface real power flow limit calculation, have been addressed. Besides, a method based on the trajectory sensitivity approach and the model predictive control has been developed for determination of under frequency load shedding strategy for real time stability assessment. These applications have shown the great efficacy and accuracy of the trajectory sensitivity method in handling these traditional power system stability problems.

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Date Created
2012

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Effect of reduced system inertia due to increased renewable resource penetration on power system stability

Description

This thesis concerns with the impact of renewable generation resources on the power system stability. The rapidly increasing integration of renewable energy sources into the grid can change the way power systems operate and respond to system disturbances. This is

This thesis concerns with the impact of renewable generation resources on the power system stability. The rapidly increasing integration of renewable energy sources into the grid can change the way power systems operate and respond to system disturbances. This is because the available inertia from synchronous machines, which helps in damping system oscillations, gets reduced as an increase in renewables like wind and solar photovoltaics is accompanied by a decrease in conventional generators. This aspect of high penetration of renewables has the potential to affect the rotor angle stability and small signal stability of power systems. The system with increased renewables is mathematically modeled to rep-resent wind and solar resources. Transient and small signal stability studies are performed for various operating cases. The main conclusion drawn from the different studies is that increased renewable penetration causes a few instability problems, most of which are either localized and do not adversely affect the over-all system stability. It is also found that the critical inter-area modes of oscillations are sufficiently damped.

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Date Created
2012

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Power system mode estimation using associate hermite expansion

Description

Many methods have been proposed to estimate power system small signal stability, for either analysis or control, through identification of modal frequencies and their damping levels. Generally, estimation methods have been employed to assess small signal stability from collected field

Many methods have been proposed to estimate power system small signal stability, for either analysis or control, through identification of modal frequencies and their damping levels. Generally, estimation methods have been employed to assess small signal stability from collected field measurements. However, the challenge to using these methods in assessing field measurements is their ability to accurately estimate stability in the presence of noise. In this thesis a new method is developed which estimates the modal content of simulated and actual field measurements using orthogonal polynomials and the results are compared to other commonly used estimators. This new method estimates oscillatory performance by fitting an associate Hermite polynomial to time domain data and extrapolating its spectrum to identify small signal power system frequencies. Once the frequencies are identified, damping assessment is performed using a modified sliding window technique with the use of linear prediction (LP). Once the entire assessment is complete the measurements can be judged to be stable or unstable. Collectively, this new technique is known as the associate Hermite expansion (AHE) algorithm. Validation of the AHE method versus results from four other spectral estimators demonstrates the method's accuracy and modal estimation ability with and without the presence of noise. A Prony analysis, a Yule-Walker autoregressive algorithm, a second sliding window estimator and the Hilbert-Huang Transform method are used in comparative assessments in support of this thesis. Results from simulated and actual field measurements are used in the comparisons, as well as artificially generated simple signals. A search for actual field testing results performed by a utility was undertaken and a request was made to obtain the measurements of a brake insertion test. Comparison results show that the AHE method is accurate as compared to the other commonly used spectral estimators and its predictive capability exceeded the other estimators in the presence of Gaussian noise. As a result, the AHE method could be employed in areas including operations and planning analysis, post-mortem analysis, power system damping scheme design and other analysis areas.

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Date Created
2010

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Short-term voltage stability analysis for power system with single-phase motor load

Description

Voltage stability is always a major concern in power system operation. Recently Fault Induced Delayed Voltage Recovery (FIDVR) has gained increased attention. It is widely believed that the motor-driven loads of high efficiency, low inertia air conditioners are one of

Voltage stability is always a major concern in power system operation. Recently Fault Induced Delayed Voltage Recovery (FIDVR) has gained increased attention. It is widely believed that the motor-driven loads of high efficiency, low inertia air conditioners are one of the main causes of FIDVR events. Simulation tools that assist power system operation and planning have been found insufficient to reproduce FIDVR events. This is because of their inaccurate load modeling of single-phase motor loads. Conventionally three-phase motor models have been used to represent the aggregation effect of single-phase motor load. However researchers have found that this modeling method is far from an accurate representation of single-phase induction motors. In this work a simulation method is proposed to study the precise influence of single-phase motor load in context of FIDVR. The load, as seen the transmission bus, is replaced with a detailed distribution system. Each single-phase motor in the distribution system is represented by an equipment-level model for best accuracy. This is to enable the simulation to capture stalling effects of air conditioner compressor motors as they are related to FIDVR events. The single phase motor models are compared against the traditional three phase aggregate approximation. Also different percentages of single-phase motor load are compared and analyzed. Simulation result shows that proposed method is able to reproduce FIDVR events. This method also provides a reasonable estimation of the power system voltage stability under the contingencies.

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Created

Date Created
2012