Matching Items (5)

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The Effect of Early Time-Restricted Feeding on the Diet Quality, Self-Efficacy, and Sleep of College Students

Description

Circadian misalignments in terms of eat and sleep cycles, common occurrences among college students, are linked to adverse health outcomes. Time-restricted feeding, a form of intermittent fasting, may offer an exciting, non-pharmacologic approach to improve the health of this population

Circadian misalignments in terms of eat and sleep cycles, common occurrences among college students, are linked to adverse health outcomes. Time-restricted feeding, a form of intermittent fasting, may offer an exciting, non-pharmacologic approach to improve the health of this population by restricting eating to feeding windows that align with circadian biology. This study aims to fill a gap in the literature regarding the effect of early time-restricted feeding (eTRF) on college students, particularly in regard to diet quality, diet self-efficacy, and sleep quality. To test the hypothesis that eTRF would lead to an increase in all three variables, a 4-wk randomized-controlled, parallel arm trial was conducted. Thirty-five healthy college students were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the intervention group (TRF) was instructed to adhere to an 8-h feeding window aligned with the light cycle (9 am to 5 pm), and the control group (CON) was instructed to adhere to a 12-h feeding window typical of college students (10 am to 10pm). The eTRF diet was consumed ad libitum, and the participants were not instructed to avoid compensatory hyperphagia. The results showed a strong, reverse effect of eTRF on diet quality: fasting had a highly significant association with decreased diet quality. The results suggest that, under free-living conditions, college students practicing eTRF are more likely to compensate for prolonged fasting with unhealthy eating and snacking.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

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Diet quality of omnivores, vegans and vegetarians as measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2010 and the Rapid Eating and Activity Assessment for Participants short version

Description

Diet quality is closely intertwined with overall health status and deserves close examination. Healthcare providers are stretched thin in the current stressed system and would benefit from a validated tool for rapid assessment of diet quality. The Rapid Eating and

Diet quality is closely intertwined with overall health status and deserves close examination. Healthcare providers are stretched thin in the current stressed system and would benefit from a validated tool for rapid assessment of diet quality. The Rapid Eating and Activity Assessment for Participants Short Version (REAP-S) represents one such option. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the REAP-S and Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010) for scoring the diet quality of omnivorous, vegetarian and vegan diets. Eighty-one healthy male and female subjects with an average age of 30.9 years completed the REAP-S as well as a 24-hour dietary recall. REAP-S and HEI-2010 scores were calculated for each subject and evaluated against each other using Spearman correlations and Chi Square. Further analysis was completed to compare diet quality scores of the HEI-2010 and REAP-S by tertiles to examine how closely these two tools score diet quality. The mean HEI-2010 score was 47.4/100 and the mean REAP-S score was 33.5/39. The correlation coefficient comparing the REAP-S to the HEI-2010 was 0.309 (p=0.005), and the REAP-S exhibited a precision of 44.4% to the HEI-2010 for diet quality. The REAP-S significantly correlated with the HEI-2010 for whole fruit (r=0.247, p=0.026), greens and beans (r=0.276, p=0.013), seafood proteins (r=0.298, p=0.007), and fatty acids (r=0.400, p<0.001). When evaluated by diet type, the REAP-S proved to have increased precision in plant-based diets, 50% for vegetarian and 52% for vegan, over omnivorous diets (32%). The REAP-S is a desirable tool to rapidly assess diet quality in the community setting as it is significantly correlated to the HEI-2010 and requires less time, labor and money to score and assess than the HEI-2010. More studies are needed to evaluate the precision and validity of REAP-S in a broader, more diverse population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015

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How Well Do Parents Assess Their Children's Diet? Results from the New Jersey Child Health Study.

Description

Objective: Parents play a critical role in their child's diets, yet there is lack of research in

the US comparing parental perception of their child’s diet with quantitatively assessed diet quality. We examined the association between parent perception of their child’s

Objective: Parents play a critical role in their child's diets, yet there is lack of research in

the US comparing parental perception of their child’s diet with quantitatively assessed diet quality. We examined the association between parent perception of their child’s overall diet and the child’s diet quality, as measured by frequency of consumption of key food categories.

Methods: Secondary analysis was conducted using data from two independent cross- sectional panels of surveys with parents of a 3-18 year old child. Data collection took place in 2009-2010 and 2014, the random sample was drawn from low-income cities. Well-established survey questions assessed parental perception of their child’s diet and frequency of consumption of fruits, vegetables, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), fast food and unhealthy snacks. Diet quality scores were calculated for each child, with higher scores reflective of healthier diets (max score= 40). Ordered logistic regressions examined associations between parental perception and consumption of food categories. Multinomial logistic regressions examined associations between levels of concordance in parent perception and diet scores by demographic sub-groups.

Results: Almost half of children were non-Hispanic black (46%) and 40% were Hispanic. Overall 52% of parents strongly agreed, 33% somewhat agreed, 10% somewhat disagreed, and 4% strongly disagreed that their child eats a healthy diet. The mean diet quality score for the sample was 20.58 ± 6.7. Children from our sample with the unhealthiest diet had a mean frequency of fruit intake = 0.8 times/day and SSBs = 2.2 times/day. Children with the healthiest diet had a mean consumption of fruit=1.7/day and

SSBs= 0.4/day. Parental perception of their child’s diet was significantly higher when their child consumed more fruit (p<0.001) and vegetables (p<0.001) and lower when their child consumed more fast food (p<0.001), SSBs (p=0.01) and unhealthy snacks (p=0.02). Over half of parents overestimated the healthfulness of their child’s diet (61%). Parent, child and household demographics did not moderate this association.

Conclusions: Although parental perceptions that their child eats healthy are associated when their child eats more healthy foods and less unhealthy foods, parents’ perceptions still do not align with their child’s diet.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

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Does Diet Quality Mediate the Relationship Between Food Insecurity and Obesity Among Preschoolers?

Description

Food insecurity and childhood obesity are both major public health concerns in the United States of America. Research has not found a definite relationship between childhood obesity and food insecurity to date, with conflicting results being found due to differences

Food insecurity and childhood obesity are both major public health concerns in the United States of America. Research has not found a definite relationship between childhood obesity and food insecurity to date, with conflicting results being found due to differences in sample sizes and protocol for measuring key variables. Preschoolers (children aged 2-5 years) are a population of particular interest as there tends to be improved health behaviors and greater adaptability to change at this period of growth and development. This study aims to evaluate if there is a relationship between food insecurity and childhood obesity with diet quality as a mediator among preschoolers in the Phoenix area. A secondary data analysis from participants (n=154) from the SAGE (Sustainability via Active Garden Education) research project was used to evaluate food insecurity status, diet quality components (kcal, saturated fat, added sugars, and servings of juice, fruits, and vegetables), and anthropometrics (waist circumference and BMI percentile). No significant associations between food insecurity status, diet quality components, and anthropometric data were found. There was an increased rate of food insecurity and childhood overweight/obesity in this sample compared to state and national averages. Further research of high quality is necessary to determine whether a relationship exists between childhood obesity and food insecurity exists and in what context. Additionally, practice and policy will need to be implemented to decrease rates of food insecurity and childhood obesity among Phoenix preschoolers.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020

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Effect of Diet Quality, FODMAP Consumption, and Gluten Consumption on Non–Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) Symptoms

Description

Despite widespread self-diagnosis of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) a variety of studies have shown that most patients with NCGS experience no symptoms from the consumption of gluten. Rather, many studies have shown that FODMAPs are the likely culprit of NCGS

Despite widespread self-diagnosis of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) a variety of studies have shown that most patients with NCGS experience no symptoms from the consumption of gluten. Rather, many studies have shown that FODMAPs are the likely culprit of NCGS symptoms. To further explore the causes of NCGS symptoms this study surveyed participants on their diet quality, FODMAP consumption, and gluten consumption while also determining NCGS symptom level using the GSRS-IBS survey and IBS-SSS survey. The results showed that diet quality was not correlated with IBS-SSS score or GSRS-IBS score. However, certain dietary components that negatively affected diet quality did correlate with NCGS symptom level. Similarly, FODMAP consumption was correlated with GSRS-IBS score while gluten consumption was correlated with both IBS-SSS and GSRS-IBS score. Overall, the results of this study suggest that limiting the consumption of FODMAPs, gluten, and foods that negatively contribute to diet quality can help reduce NCGS symptom level.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05