Matching Items (7)

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Analyzing the Impact of Gamification on Mobile Health and Fitness Applications

Description

In the past decade, the use of mobile applications, specifically mobile applications focused on improving the health and fitness of users, has increased exponentially. As more consumers look towards mobile

In the past decade, the use of mobile applications, specifically mobile applications focused on improving the health and fitness of users, has increased exponentially. As more consumers look towards mobile health applications to improve their health through dieting, exercise, and weight management, it is important to analyze how the concept of gamification can encourage sustained interaction and approval of these health-focused applications. This thesis aims to understand the prevalence of gamification amongst a large sample of health and fitness applications, identify and code the gamification features used in these apps, and finally, understand how different gamification features relate to the popularity and willingness to advocate using eWOM on behalf of a mobile app.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The use of technology compared to the traditional educational methods to improve hydration status of club-level collegiate athletes with a focus on cognitive performance

Description

It is widely documented and accepted that athletes have difficulty maintaining adequate hydration status and that dehydration is a key risk factor for the heat-related illnesses commonly observed among athletes.

It is widely documented and accepted that athletes have difficulty maintaining adequate hydration status and that dehydration is a key risk factor for the heat-related illnesses commonly observed among athletes. Research has also suggested that hydration status can influence cognitive performance. Educational interventions focused on rehydration strategies have had minimal success reducing dehydration rates; hence, alternative interventions promoting adequate hydration status in athletes should be explored. This trial examined the efficacy of a commercial hydration mobile application (app) for reducing dehydration rates in campus athletes. Fifty-eight college students aged 18-40 y, who participated in club-level collegiate athletics were recruited from a large Southwestern university and randomized by team to one of two study arms, the Standard of Care – Education (EDU) or the hydration mobile app (APP), to determine if app technology improved hydration status as compared to traditional education messaging. Twenty-three (79%) in the EDU group and twenty (69%) in the APP group were mildly-dehydrated at baseline based on the three-day averages of hydration assessment (USG 1.010). Moreover, 31% (n=9) and 28% (n=8) of the EDU and APP groups, respectively, were dehydrated (USG 1.020). No significant differences were found between the EDU and APP groups following the intervention. Three-day average post-intervention USG testing showed 76% (n=22) and 72% (n=21) of the EDU and APP groups respectively were at best mildly-dehydrated. Additionally, 28% (n=8) and 17% (n=5) were considered dehydrated. Neither intervention improved hydration status after four weeks of treatment. Further analyses of cognitive measures were conducted by hydration assessment groups at baseline and post-intervention: hydrated (HYD) (USG < 1.020) or dehydrated (DEH) (USG 1.020). No significant differences between hydration status were found between intervention groups. Additionally, no significant improvements were seen for either group, which indicates there is still a need for a novel way to improve hydration status in this population. Multi-dimensional interventions and individualized interventions to improve hydration status in this at-risk population may be more effective. Additional research should be conducted to determine if there is any cognitive performance enhancement associated with dehydration or mild-dehydration by reassessing previous data and conducting future trials.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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The popular calorie counter app, MyFitnessPal, used to improve dietary sodium intake: a four-week randomized parallel trial

Description

Nutrition instruction has become more accessible; it is no longer relegated to the doctor’s office, dietitian briefing, outpatient clinic, or hospital. Now it is available in people’s hands, pockets, and

Nutrition instruction has become more accessible; it is no longer relegated to the doctor’s office, dietitian briefing, outpatient clinic, or hospital. Now it is available in people’s hands, pockets, and purses via their smartphone. Since nutrition instruction has become more accessible, health professionals and members of the general public are increasingly interested in using smartphone apps to assist with health-related dietary changes. With more and more of the population required to follow certain dietary recommendations and/or monitor specific nutrient intake, commercially available apps may be a useful and cost-effective resource for the public. The purpose of this four-week intervention was to determine if the popular calorie counter app, MyFitnessPal, can be used to reduce sodium intake to ≤ 2,300 mg/day compared to the traditional paper-and-pencil method. This four-week randomized parallel trial enrolled 30 generally healthy adults who were 18 to 80 years of age. Participants were randomly assigned to the MyFitnessPal (“APP”) group or to the paper (“PAP”) group and required to meet three times with the researcher for screening, baseline (start), and completion of the study. There was a significant difference in the mean urinary sodium change between the APP group and the PAP group from the start of the intervention to the completion (-24.0±32.6 and 8.5±41.9 mmol/g creatinine respectively, p = 0.027). Other positive trends that resulted from the intervention included a decline in dietary sodium in both groups and a higher adherence in the APP group compared to the PAP group regarding recording method. The MyFitnessPal app proved to be a useful tool in reducing and/or monitoring sodium intake. Thus, this trial reinforces the potential of this app to be used for monitoring other nutrients, but further research needs to be conducted.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Feasibility of a mobile meditation application to improve psychological factors affecting performance in baseball players

Description

Pitchers are a vital part of the game of baseball and may account for up to two-thirds of the variance in win percentage. As they rise through the ranks of

Pitchers are a vital part of the game of baseball and may account for up to two-thirds of the variance in win percentage. As they rise through the ranks of competition, physical skill set becomes less of a factor when compared to mentality. Pitchers are the “first line of defense” for keeping opponents from having an opportunity to score, as well as for holding onto their own team’s lead. Baseball pitchers not only face pressure to perform, but also experience stress from factors such as low pay, adjusting to higher levels of competition, and internal team competition for a limited number of spots. Athletes are often resistant to seeking aid from sport psychologists and often turn to unfavorable means to cope (i.e. drugs/alcohol, excessive exercise) with stress instead. Meditation has been shown to have beneficial effects on psychological factors associated with performance including emotional regulation, anxiety, confidence, focus, and mindfulness. Mobile applications have become a popular means of delivering mindfulness. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of delivering a mindful meditation intervention using a mobile meditation application to improve psychological factors associated with performance (i.e. emotional regulation, anxiety (somatic and cognitive), confidence, focus, mindfulness) to minor league baseball pitchers. Pitchers in instructional league (Phase one) and off season (Phase two) were asked to meditate daily for 10-minutes each day for three weeks (Phase one) and eight weeks (Phase two). Pitchers were asked to complete self-report questionnaires and satisfaction surveys at pre- and post-intervention. Pitchers in phase one reported enjoying meditation, had improvements in self-confidence and sport confidence, and reported moderate decreases in cognitive anxiety and concentration disruption. Pitchers in phase two also enjoyed meditating (94.7%) and had improvements in self-confidence and moderate decreases in somatic anxiety. Low adherence due to timing (off-season) of intervention may have been a contributing factor to fewer outcomes. Future research should explore the feasibility and effectiveness of implementing meditation during the baseball season.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Understanding the determinants of success in mobile apps markets

Description

Mobile applications (Apps) markets with App stores have introduced a new approach to define and sell software applications with access to a large body of heterogeneous consumer population. Several distinctive

Mobile applications (Apps) markets with App stores have introduced a new approach to define and sell software applications with access to a large body of heterogeneous consumer population. Several distinctive features of mobile App store markets including – (a) highly heterogeneous consumer preferences and values, (b) high consumer cognitive burden of searching a large selection of similar Apps, and (c) continuously updateable product features and price – present a unique opportunity for IS researchers to investigate theoretically motivated research questions in this area. The aim of this dissertation research is to investigate the key determinants of mobile Apps success in App store markets. The dissertation is organized into three distinct and related studies. First, using the key tenets of product portfolio management theory and theory of economies of scope, this study empirically investigates how sellers’ App portfolio strategies are associated with sales performance over time. Second, the sale performance impacts of App product cues, generated from App product descriptions and offered from market formats, are examined using the theories of market signaling and cue utilization. Third, the role of App updates in stimulating consumer demands in the presence of strong ranking effects is appraised. The findings of this dissertation work highlight the impacts of sellers’ App assortment, strategic product description formulation, and long-term App management with price/feature updates on success in App market. The dissertation studies make key contributions to the IS literature by highlighting three key managerially and theoretically important findings related to mobile Apps: (1) diversification across selling categories is a key driver of high survival probability in the top charts, (2) product cues strategically presented in the descriptions have complementary relationships with market cues in influencing App sales, and (3) continuous quality improvements have long-term effects on App success in the presence of strong ranking effects.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Undergraduate signal processing laboratories on the Android platform

Description

The field of education has been immensely benefited by major breakthroughs in technology. The arrival of computers and the internet made student-teacher interaction from different parts of the world viable,

The field of education has been immensely benefited by major breakthroughs in technology. The arrival of computers and the internet made student-teacher interaction from different parts of the world viable, increasing the reach of the educator to hitherto remote corners of the world. The arrival of mobile phones in the recent past has the potential to provide the next paradigm shift in the way education is conducted. It combines the universal reach and powerful visualization capabilities of the computer with intimacy and portability. Engineering education is a field which can exploit the benefits of mobile devices to enhance learning and spread essential technical know-how to different parts of the world. In this thesis, I present AJDSP, an Android application evolved from JDSP, providing an intuitive and a easy to use environment for signal processing education. AJDSP is a graphical programming laboratory for digital signal processing developed for the Android platform. It is designed to provide utility; both as a supplement to traditional classroom learning and as a tool for self-learning. The architecture of AJDSP is based on the Model-View-Controller paradigm optimized for the Android platform. The extensive set of function modules cover a wide range of basic signal processing areas such as convolution, fast Fourier transform, z transform and filter design. The simple and intuitive user interface inspired from iJDSP is designed to facilitate ease of navigation and to provide the user with an intimate learning environment. Rich visualizations necessary to understand mathematically intensive signal processing algorithms have been incorporated into the software. Interactive demonstrations boosting student understanding of concepts like convolution and the relation between different signal domains have also been developed. A set of detailed assessments to evaluate the application has been conducted for graduate and senior-level undergraduate students.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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A novel "Food Lists" app to promote weight loss, improve diet quality, and strengthen diet adherence: the Foodmindr study

Description

Background: Smartphone diet tracking applications (apps) are increasing in popularity but may not adequately address the important concerns of proper intake and of diet quality. Two novel weight loss

Background: Smartphone diet tracking applications (apps) are increasing in popularity but may not adequately address the important concerns of proper intake and of diet quality. Two novel weight loss apps were designed based on the popular dietary frameworks: MyPlate and FoodLists. MyPlate, the dietary guidelines put forth by the U.S. government, encourages a balanced diet from five primary food groups, but does not specify intake limits. The Food Lists set upper intake limits on all food groups except vegetables, and these guidelines extend to include fats, sweets, and alcohol.

Objective: The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine whether adherence to a weight loss app providing intake limits and more food group detail (the Food Lists app) facilitated more weight loss and better diet quality than adherence to a weight loss app based on the MyPlate platform. An additional objective was to examine whether higher app adherence would lead to greater weight loss.

Design: Thirty seven adults from a campus population were recruited, randomized, and instructed to follow either the Food Lists app (N=20) or the MyPlate app (N=17) for eight weeks. Subjects received one 15 minute session of diet and app training at baseline, and their use of the app was tracked daily. Body mass was measured at baseline and post-test.

Participants/setting: Healthy adults from a university campus population in downtown Phoenix, Arizona with BMI 24 to 40, medically stable, and who owned a smartphone.

Main outcome measures: Outcome measures included weight change, days of adherence, and diet quality change. Secondary measures included BMI, fat %, and waist circumference.

Statistical analysis: Descriptive statistics (means and standard errors); Repeated measures ANOVAs analyzing weight, diet quality, and BMI; Pearson and Spearman correlations analyzing adherence and weight loss.

Results: Repeated measures ANOVAs and correlations revealed no significant mean differences in primary outcome variables of weight loss, adherence, or diet quality (P=0.140; P=0.790; P=0.278). However, there was a significant mean reduction of BMI favoring the group using the Food Lists app (P=0.041).

Conclusion: The findings strengthen the idea that intake limits and food group detail may be associated with weight loss. Further investigation is warranted to determine whether longer use of the Food Lists app can produce more significant dieting successes and encourage healthier behavioral outcomes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016