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A Comparison of Traditional and Online Learning

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This thesis project focused on comparing different aspects of traditional in person<br/>learning and remote online learning and how these two types of learning environments impact<br/>students in the elementary grade levels,

This thesis project focused on comparing different aspects of traditional in person<br/>learning and remote online learning and how these two types of learning environments impact<br/>students in the elementary grade levels, specifically Kindergarten through sixth grade. For this<br/>thesis project, I conducted podcast interviews in which I interviewed many different teachers at<br/>different elementary grade levels. These teachers all had experience at some point with both<br/>traditional in person learning and remote online learning. All of these teachers have many<br/>different levels of experience and teach in various districts across the state of Arizona. The<br/>purpose of this thesis project was to learn and understand how these two different types of<br/>learning environments impact both students and teachers. Throughout this thesis project, I have<br/>become increasingly passionate in my future teaching career. I have learned so much about<br/>myself through this process and was able to improve my communication skills through<br/>conducting these interviews as well as significantly increase my knowledge on both in person<br/>learning and remote online learning.

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  • 2021-05

Mediating Tradition in Traditional Jazz as a Scholar-Performer

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Traditional jazz refers specifically to iterations of New Orleans style jazz since its beginnings in the early 20th century. It has been labelled "Dixieland," "Classic Jazz," "New Orleans jazz," "Trad,"

Traditional jazz refers specifically to iterations of New Orleans style jazz since its beginnings in the early 20th century. It has been labelled "Dixieland," "Classic Jazz," "New Orleans jazz," "Trad," or "Our Kind of Music (OKOM)" among other names. As a scholar-performer, I learned this style of music in my undergraduate studies in Provo, Utah and later taught it as a graduate student in Phoenix, Arizona. This research grows out of the challenges I encountered mediating between the academic institution, the non-academic tradition, and student needs. Combining musicological methods such as historiography and artifact analysis with reflexive ethnography and performance pedagogy more typical of other disciplines, I consider how educators might represent traditional jazz in a more culturally responsible way. To begin, I reference historical newspapers and oral histories to show how the labels of “Dixieland” and “traditional jazz” have evolved over time and taken on a variety of associations. Specifically, I note how the word “Dixieland” is problematic for the ways it reinforces nostalgic fantasies of the “old south” and prevents African Americans from participating without the oppressive and offensive stereotypes created by white minstrel entertainers. I then consider how prominent figures have established their authority to speak for traditional jazz by looking at several pedagogical artifacts for the style of traditional jazz drumming. I highlight how each of these artifacts’ authors present the subject and color their audience’s view of traditional jazz. Having analyzed these methods of genre definition, I discuss the tenuous place of traditional jazz within university jazz programs and its potential futures through interviews I conducted with jazz educators. These interviews focus on teaching traditional jazz within the academy and the potential for the jazz ensemble as a site of scholar-performer interdisciplinary collaboration. Finally, following models of reflexive ethnography established by ethnomusicologists leading world music ensembles, I analyze my own experience teaching traditional jazz ensembles. My synthesis of methods from musicology, ethnomusicology, music education, and jazz performance departments serves as an important bridge between these disciplines, and in turn, improves jazz instruction, offers insight into genre definition, and illuminates how institutional structures shape the subject.

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  • 2021