Matching Items (5)

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Diabetes Education/Management Needs for Chinese Americans with Type 2 Diabetes: Opportunities and Implications for Design

Description

Diabetes education has shown to improve diabetes health markers but there is a need for it to be more accessible Diabetes education in the form of Diabetes Self Education and

Diabetes education has shown to improve diabetes health markers but there is a need for it to be more accessible Diabetes education in the form of Diabetes Self Education and Management (DSMES) could potentially utilize IT technologies, which have shown promise as a more accessible way to access healthcare and manage health. However, both these methods have not been optimized for the diverse population in the US. In particular, Chinese Americans are a growing minority group in America whose health needs such as diabetes type 2 are growing. As a cultural group, Chinese Americans have cultural characteristics that have been identified in the literature, which should be accounted for in the design of a technology-enabled DSMES program. This qualitative study aims to understand what ways Chinese Americans with type 2 diabetes are learning about and managing diabetes, as well as their technology usage. Themes such as cultural food importance, family roles, information acquisition, and attitudes and motivation emerged. Themes motivated the design implications and recommendations such as creating a more specified, culturally tailored Chinese food menu, integrated family features, and trackers with increased feedback. More research should be conducted to test the effectiveness of including these features in a technology-enabled DSMES program.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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An Analysis of the Diversity of Chinese Languages in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

Description

This project analyzes the diversity of the various Chinese languages present in the Phoenix metropolitan area. The diversity and presence of these languages can be used to make inferences about

This project analyzes the diversity of the various Chinese languages present in the Phoenix metropolitan area. The diversity and presence of these languages can be used to make inferences about different aspects of the Chinese American community in the Phoenix area, and therefore the dialects and compared to other aspects of the Chinese American immigration experience, such as where immigrants are from, what areas of Phoenix they reside, and the Chinese language skills of both the participants and their children. The data is then presented with historical context of the Phoenix Chinese community as well as a brief discussion on the current Chinese community in Phoenix as well as the acculturation of Chinese American children.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The incremental effects of ethnically matching animated agents in restructuring the irrational career beliefs of Chinese American young women

Description

Believe It! is an animated interactive computer program that delivers cognitive restructuring to adolescent females' irrational career beliefs. It challenges the irrational belief and offers more reasonable alternatives. The current

Believe It! is an animated interactive computer program that delivers cognitive restructuring to adolescent females' irrational career beliefs. It challenges the irrational belief and offers more reasonable alternatives. The current study investigated the potentially differential effects of Asian versus Caucasian animated agents in delivering the treatment to young Chinese American women. The results suggested that the Asian animated agent was not significantly superior to the Caucasian animated agent. Nor was there a significant interaction between level of acculturation and the effects of the animated agents. Ways to modify the Believe It! program for Chinese American users were recommended.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Exploring factors influencing Chinese American older adults' intentions to plan for end-of-life care

Description

This study aimed to understand the factors that influence Chinese American older adults’ advance care planning (ACP) on end-of-life care. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Health Belief Model

This study aimed to understand the factors that influence Chinese American older adults’ advance care planning (ACP) on end-of-life care. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Health Belief Model (HBM) were primarily applied to explain Chinese American older adults’ intentions toward two behaviors: 1) discussion of end-of-life care plans with family members and 2) completion of an advance directive (AD). Additionally, acculturation and family cohesion were considered to examine their impacts on the TPB and HBM. A cross-sectional survey was conducted through face-to-face interviews on a sample of 298 community-dwelling Chinese-American adults aged 55 and older living in the metropolitan Phoenix area of Arizona. Based upon random assignment, 161 participants answered questions regarding discussing end-of-life care plans with family members, while 137 participants answered questions related to the completion of an AD. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to focus on the influence of TPB and HBM measures on behavioral intentions toward the two behaviors. Results indicated that both the TPB and HBM had predictive power to explain the target population’s intentions. However, the predictability of TPB and HBM measures varied across the two behaviors. Acculturation moderated the relationship between attitudes and intentions to complete an AD negatively. Family cohesion moderated the relationship between perceived benefits and intentions to discuss end-of-life care plans with family members negatively. These findings would help inform future interventions for improving the target population’s ACP awareness and engagement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Chinese American adolescents' cultural frameworks for understanding parenting

Description

Parenting approaches that are firm yet warm (i.e., authoritative parenting) have been found to be robustly beneficial for mainstream White Americans youths, but do not demonstrate similarly consistent effects among

Parenting approaches that are firm yet warm (i.e., authoritative parenting) have been found to be robustly beneficial for mainstream White Americans youths, but do not demonstrate similarly consistent effects among Chinese Americans (CA) adolescents. Evidence suggests that CA adolescents interpret and experience parenting differently than their mainstream counterparts given differences in parenting values and child-rearing norms between traditional Chinese and mainstream American cultures. The current study tests the theory that prospective effects of parenting on psychological and academic functioning depends on adolescents' cultural frameworks for interpreting and understanding parenting. CA adolescents with values and expectations of parenting that are more consistent with mainstream American parenting norms were predicted to experience parenting similar to their White American counterparts (i.e., benefiting from a combination of parental strictness and warmth). In contrast, CA adolescents with parenting values and expectations more consistent with traditional Chinese parenting norms were predicted to experience parenting and its effects on academic and psychological outcomes differently than patterns documented in the mainstream literature. This study was conducted with a sample of Chinese American 9th graders (N = 500) from the Multicultural Family Adolescent Study. Latent Class Analysis (LCA), a person-centered approach to modeling CA adolescents' cultural frameworks for interpreting parenting, was employed using a combination of demographic variables (e.g., nativity, language use at home, mother's length of stay in the U.S.) and measures of parenting values and expectations (e.g., parental respect, ideal strictness & laxness). The study then examined whether prospective effects of parenting behaviors (strict control, warmth, and their interaction effect) on adolescent adjustment (internalizing and externalizing symptoms, substance use, and GPA) were moderated by latent class membership. The optimal LCA solution identified five distinct cultural frameworks for understanding parenting. Findings generally supported the idea that effects of parenting on CA adolescent adjustment depend on adolescents' cultural framework for parenting. The classic authoritative parenting effect (high strictness and warmth leads to positive outcomes) was found for the two most acculturated groups of adolescents. However, only one of these groups overtly endorsed mainstream American parenting values.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011