Matching Items (7)

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Effectiveness of online community college success courses

Description

The purpose of this action research study was to determine the effectiveness of two online college success courses: CPD 150 (College Success, 3 credits) and CPD 115 (Success Strategies, 1

The purpose of this action research study was to determine the effectiveness of two online college success courses: CPD 150 (College Success, 3 credits) and CPD 115 (Success Strategies, 1 credit), at Rio Salado College, a Maricopa Community College in Arizona. The goal of these courses is to prepare students to be college-ready by examining college readiness and learning skills. The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire measured students' perceptions of their own college readiness in a pre-test/post-test format. Understanding students' perceptions of their own college readiness is the college's first step in understanding the effectiveness of these courses. Descriptive statistical analysis was used to compare the pre- and post-tests to determine whether the average student scores changed after completion of the college success course. Paired samples t-tests (or repeated-measures test) were conducted on 2 scales consisting of 13 subscales of the MSLQ of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. Data analysis revealed that students reported that they had better study skills after the course than before completing the course. Particularly, learning strategies, test anxiety, self-efficacy, effort regulation (self-management), control of learning beliefs, study skills, and time and study environment stand out as showing substantial improvement for the students.  

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Expanding entrepreneurial strategies to increase revenues: a study of three distinctive higher education institutions with practical application at a community college

Description

Higher education institutions in the state of Arizona have experienced a reduction in government funding due to the economic challenges the state is facing combined with an ongoing national recession.

Higher education institutions in the state of Arizona have experienced a reduction in government funding due to the economic challenges the state is facing combined with an ongoing national recession. Three higher education institutions studied are located in Phoenix, Arizona. The three higher education institutions are Phoenix College, Arizona State University and The University of Phoenix. An analysis of documents made public by each institution was conducted and high level administrators at each institution were interviewed to learn about revenue streams currently active and planned. The results of this set of analyses were presented to the leadership team of Phoenix College in a three-hour strategic planning and priority setting meeting. The action research study assisted Phoenix College administrators in gaining knowledge about and initiating action plans to increase revenue through entrepreneurial strategies. Increased funding is necessary to offset reductions in state aid and property tax revenues. Implementing entrepreneurial strategies to increase funding can promote self-reliance and flexibility and can mitigate the damage to institutional mission success that is threatened by reductions in traditional funding. The strategic planning and priority setting exercise conducted at Phoenix College produced three immediate outcomes: it informed the community of practice about entrepreneurial strategies to increase funding that are in use by higher education institutions located in greater Phoenix, Arizona; it influenced the community of practice to examine entrepreneurial revenue streams and; it committed the leadership team to pursuing and enlarging three additional revenue streams.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Sustainability education at the community college: implication for policy and practice

Description

Sustainability is a relatively new topic that has transcended traditional disciplinary boundaries. Since faculty members have been trained in traditional disciplines, developing curriculum for and teaching sustainability presents both a

Sustainability is a relatively new topic that has transcended traditional disciplinary boundaries. Since faculty members have been trained in traditional disciplines, developing curriculum for and teaching sustainability presents both a great opportunity and a challenge. In order to embrace sustainability education and develop and implement new curriculum, faculty members have to expend a large amount of effort and time. Moreover, faculty members require support and help of professional development programs. All these issues and problems demonstrate a need for this research study. The purpose of this study was to analyze the processes and procedures used by a small sample of faculty members of Greenville Community College District (GCCD) to integrate sustainability into the curriculum and classroom. The diffusion of innovation was identified as the conceptual framework, and qualitative case study methodology was used. The findings revealed three major themes why faculty members were interested in sustainability education: love of nature, inherent nature of their discipline, and commitment to issues of equity. The findings revealed that sustainability is taught using pedagogical tools such as experiential learning, problem-based learning, inquiry-based learning, and a heavy focus on research. As lesson plans were developed, appropriate assessment tools were created. The participants interviewed identified several barriers for teaching interdisciplinary courses, among which time constraints and increase in workload emerged as common themes. The study found that strategies for helping mainstream faculty members embrace sustainability education were time, rewards, recognition, support and encouragement, motivation of students, and creating a network of early adopters as mentors.  

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Self-regulated learning in a hybrid science course at a community college

Description

Community college students are attracted to courses with alternative delivery formats such as hybrid courses because the more flexible delivery associated with such courses provides convenience for busy students. In

Community college students are attracted to courses with alternative delivery formats such as hybrid courses because the more flexible delivery associated with such courses provides convenience for busy students. In a hybrid course, face-to-face, structured seat time is exchanged for online components. In such courses, students take more responsibility for their learning because they assume additional responsibility for learning more of the course material on their own. Thus, self-regulated learning (SRL) behaviors have the potential to be useful for students to successfully navigate hybrid courses because the online components require exercise of more personal control over the autonomous learning situations inherent in hybrid courses. Self-regulated learning theory includes three components: metacognition, motivation, and behavioral actions. In the current study, this theoretical framework is used to examine how inducing self-regulated learning activities among students taking a hybrid course influence performance in a community college science course. The intervention for this action research study consisted of a suite of activities that engage students in self-regulated learning behaviors to foster student performance. The specific SRL activities included predicting grades, reflections on coursework and study efforts in course preparation logs, explanation of SRL procedures in response to a vignette, photo ethnography work on their personal use of SRL approaches, and a personalized study plan. A mixed method approach was employed to gather evidence for the study. Results indicate that community college students use a variety of self-regulated learning strategies to support their learning of course material. Further, engaging community college students in learning reflection activities appears to afford some students with opportunities to refine their SRL skills and influence their learning. The discussion focuses on integrating the quantitative and qualitative data and explanation of the findings using the SRL framework. Additionally, lessons learned, limitations, and implications for practice and research are discussed. Specifically, it is suggested that instructors can foster student learning in hybrid courses by teaching students to engage in SRL processes and behaviors rather than merely focusing on delivery of course content. Such SRL behaviors allow students to exercise greater control over the autonomous learning situations inherent in hybrid courses.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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When isomorphism fails: structural barriers to a community college honors program

Description

The number of community college honors programs has significantly increased since the 1980s. This study analyzes qualitative data collected from employee, student, and faculty participants associated with a community college

The number of community college honors programs has significantly increased since the 1980s. This study analyzes qualitative data collected from employee, student, and faculty participants associated with a community college honors program in the western United States during the months of April 2011 and January-March 2012. Using a theoretical framework derived from literature on Institutional Isomorphism and Academic Capitalism, this work explores the motivations behind the creation of a community college honors program, the implementation of the program, and the program's effects on the micro-level experiences of those affiliated. The data analysis reveals that the motivations for the incorporation and continuation of the Honors Program are driven by hopes of improving the college's reputation and attracting new funding sources for its academic programs. These findings are consistent with arguments about Institutional Isomorphism and Academic Capitalism. However, consistent with literature on program implementation, I identified barriers in the form of staff and student perceptions that impede Honor's program conformity to ideal standards. I refer to this finding as "incomplete isomorphism."

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Collaboration across organizational boundaries: developing an information technology community of practice : Arizona State University

Description

Rapidly increasing demand for technology support services, and often shrinking budgetary and staff resources, create enormous challenges for information technology (IT) departments in public sector higher education. To address these

Rapidly increasing demand for technology support services, and often shrinking budgetary and staff resources, create enormous challenges for information technology (IT) departments in public sector higher education. To address these difficult circumstances, the researcher developed a network of IT professionals from schools in a local community college system and from a research university in the southwest into an interorganizational community of practice (CoP). This collaboration allowed members from participating institutions to share knowledge and ideas relating to shared technical problems. This study examines the extent to which the community developed, the factors that contributed to its development and the value of such an endeavor. The researcher used a mixed methods approach to gather data and insights relative to these research questions. Data were collected through online surveys, meeting notes and transcripts, post-meeting questionnaires, semi-structured interviews with key informants, and web analytics. The results from this research indicate that the group did coalesce into a CoP. The researcher identified two crucial roles that aided this development: community coordinator and technology steward. Furthermore, the IT professionals who participated and the leaders from their organizations reported that developing the community was a worthwhile venture. They also reported that while the technical collaboration component was very valuable, the non-technical topics and interactions were also very beneficial. Indicators also suggest that the community made progress toward self-sustainability and is likely to continue. There is also discussion of a third leadership role that appears important for developing CoPs that span organizational boundaries, that of the community catalyst. Implications from this study suggest that other higher education IT organizations faced with similar circumstances may be able to follow the model presented here and also achieve positive results.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

Kingsinger, Jack

Description

A native of Akron, Ohio, Jack Kingsinger started his career fresh out of high school as a navigator in the Air Force toward the end of World War II.

A native of Akron, Ohio, Jack Kingsinger started his career fresh out of high school as a navigator in the Air Force toward the end of World War II. When the war ended, he pursued a double major Bachelors degree in Chemistry and Mathematics at Hiram College in Hiram, Ohio. He then went on to get a Masters degree in Chemistry from Cornell University. While working in private industry, he took advantage of the education benefits offered by the company he was working at and worked at getting his PhD in Chemistry from Penn. Academia was calling him, so he joined the faculty in the Chemistry Department at Michigan State. He later became the Chair of the department before leaving to become the Director of Chemistry at the National Science Foundation. He returned to Michigan State as the Assistant VP of Research which led to becoming the Associate Provost.

His journey to Arizona State University was actually initiated on a trip he made to visit the Chemistry Department as part of his role with the NSF. He was very impressed with the campus and when the position of Vice President of Academic Affairs opened up, he was quick to pursue it. He was hired by then President J. Russell Nelson and worked on many initiatives until his retirement.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2009-12-04