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Bryan Johanson's 13 ways of looking at 12 strings for two guitars: recording and critical investigation

Description

The purpose of this project is to introduce Bryan Johanson's composition for two guitars, 13 Ways of Looking at 12 Strings, and present an authoritative recording appropriate for publishing. This

The purpose of this project is to introduce Bryan Johanson's composition for two guitars, 13 Ways of Looking at 12 Strings, and present an authoritative recording appropriate for publishing. This fifty-minute piece represents a fascinating suite in thirteen movements. The author of this project performed both guitar parts, recorded them separately in a music studio, then mixed them together into one recording. This document focuses on the critical investigation and description of the piece with a brief theoretical analysis, a discussion of performance difficulties, and guitar preparation. The composer approved the use and the scope of this project. Bryan Johanson is one of the leading contemporary composers for the guitar today. 13 Ways of Looking at 12 Strings is a unique guitar dictionary that takes us from Bach to Hendrix and highlights the unique capabilities of the instrument. It utilizes encoded messages, glass slides, metal mutes, explosive "riffs," rhythmic propulsion, improvisation, percussion, fugual writing, and much more. It has a great potential to make the classical guitar attractive to wider audiences, not limited only to guitarists and musicians. The main resources employed in researching this document are existing recordings of Johanson's other compositions and documentation of his personal views and ideas. This written document uses the composer's prolific and eclectic compositional output in order to draw conclusions and trace motifs. This project is a significant and original contribution in expanding the guitar's repertoire, and it uniquely contributes to bringing forth a significant piece of music.

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  • 2011

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Harpsichord Suite in A Minor by Élisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre Arranged for Solo Guitar

Description

Transcriptions and arrangements of works originally written for other instruments have greatly expanded the guitar’s repertoire. This project focuses on a new arrangement of the Suite in A Minor by

Transcriptions and arrangements of works originally written for other instruments have greatly expanded the guitar’s repertoire. This project focuses on a new arrangement of the Suite in A Minor by Élisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre (1665–1729), which originally was composed for harpsichord. The author chose this work because the repertoire for the guitar is critically lacking in examples of French Baroque harpsichord music and also of works by female composers. The suite includes an unmeasured harpsichord prelude––a genre that, to the author’s knowledge, has not been arranged for the modern six-string guitar. This project also contains a brief account of Jacquet de la Guerre’s life, discusses the genre of unmeasured harpsichord preludes, and provides an overview of compositional aspects of the suite. Furthermore, it includes the arrangement methodology, which shows the process of creating an idiomatic arrangement from harpsichord to solo guitar while trying to preserve the integrity of the original work. A summary of the changes in the current arrangement is presented in Appendix B.

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Date Created
  • 2019

Prelude and Fugue in A Minor by Miloslav Gajdoš A Transcription for Guitar and Performance Guide

Description

This research project introduces the Czech composer Miloslav Gajdoš (b. 1948) to classical guitarists through his composition Prelude and Fugue in A Minor, composed in 1998. Gajdoš is a double

This research project introduces the Czech composer Miloslav Gajdoš (b. 1948) to classical guitarists through his composition Prelude and Fugue in A Minor, composed in 1998. Gajdoš is a double bass virtuoso who has enjoyed a successful career performing, composing, and teaching. After the fall of the communist regime in Czechoslovakia in 1989, Gajdoš was allowed more opportunities to perform outside the Czech Republic and to become better known throughout the world. His Prelude and Fugue in A Minor, originally for solo double bass, works well on the guitar and is a rewarding piece to learn and perform. A transcription is presented here that is of publishable quality, together with a biography of Gajdoš and a performance guide. The biography was written from available research materials as well as from direct email correspondence with the composer, and includes authorized quotations from those emails. This project also includes a description of the piece together with musical and technical suggestions that will aid the performer in creating a satisfying musical interpretation. Chapter Three includes a description of the left-hand challenges that were encountered while the piece was being transcribed and the solutions that were devised to mitigate them. Finding new pieces to transcribe for the guitar has long been an important activity of serious players, and this transcription adds a substantial and expressive piece to the growing repertoire of the classical guitar.

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Date Created
  • 2017

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Transcribing English Virginal Music for Two Guitars: Historical Perspective, Methodology, and Practical Applications

Description

In the 1950s, Miguel Llobet (1878–1938) and Emilio Pujol (1886–1980) published the first transcriptions of piano and orchestral music for two guitars that became staples in the repertoire. Ida Presti

In the 1950s, Miguel Llobet (1878–1938) and Emilio Pujol (1886–1980) published the first transcriptions of piano and orchestral music for two guitars that became staples in the repertoire. Ida Presti (1924–1967) and Alexandre Lagoya (1929–1999) expanded their efforts with new adaptations of Baroque, Romantic, and Modern music. Following their examples, generations of professional guitar duos have maintained a similar transcription repertoire. However, closer examination reveals noticeable gaps in it as Renaissance works have been largely overlooked. To illuminate this issue, chapter 2 revisits adaptations for two guitars of music originally written for vihuelas, lutes, viols, and the virginal to inquire about the reasons for this neglect and discuss plausible solutions. Because the virginal stands out for its innovative characteristics and alignment with the solo lute works by John Dowland (1563–1626) and John Johnson (ca. 1545–1594), the “English School” of Virginalists is further explored as a potential source of suitable works for transcriptions.

Chapter 3 discusses philosophical concepts and editorial practices to propose a method aimed at producing stylistically faithful adaptations of virginal music. The editorial criteria for this method are informed by in-depth reflections on terminology, the ontology of musical works, the notion of authenticity, and common sixteenth-century practices from musica ficta to tuning temperaments and notational conventions. Concerning ethical matters, this chapter assesses authorship issues that originated at the turn of the nineteenth century but are still adopted by modern editors and transcribers. This discussion aims to shed light on both the negative impact on intellectual property and how it can be avoided by simply resorting to the practice of scholarly transcriptions. Chapters 4 and 5 explain the procedures and applications of the proposed method in two parts: adaptation and revision. The first introduces concepts and strategies from choosing suitable works to balancing playability and aesthetic fidelity intended to produce a preliminary version of the original work. The second establishes a knowledge base through musico-historical discussions and comparative analyses of sources that inform editorial decisions and necessary changes to be implemented in the final score.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019