Matching Items (3)

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Topic sensitive sourcerank: extending sourcerank for performing context-sensitive search over deep-web

Description

Source selection is one of the foremost challenges for searching deep-web. For a user query, source selection involves selecting a subset of deep-web sources expected to provide relevant answers to the user query. Existing source selection models employ query-similarity based

Source selection is one of the foremost challenges for searching deep-web. For a user query, source selection involves selecting a subset of deep-web sources expected to provide relevant answers to the user query. Existing source selection models employ query-similarity based local measures for assessing source quality. These local measures are necessary but not sufficient as they are agnostic to source trustworthiness and result importance, which, given the autonomous and uncurated nature of deep-web, have become indispensible for searching deep-web. SourceRank provides a global measure for assessing source quality based on source trustworthiness and result importance. SourceRank's effectiveness has been evaluated in single-topic deep-web environments. The goal of the thesis is to extend sourcerank to a multi-topic deep-web environment. Topic-sensitive sourcerank is introduced as an effective way of extending sourcerank to a deep-web environment containing a set of representative topics. In topic-sensitive sourcerank, multiple sourcerank vectors are created, each biased towards a representative topic. At query time, using the topic of query keywords, a query-topic sensitive, composite sourcerank vector is computed as a linear combination of these pre-computed biased sourcerank vectors. Extensive experiments on more than a thousand sources in multiple domains show 18-85% improvements in result quality over Google Product Search and other existing methods.

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Date Created
2011

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Trust as a Multilevel Phenomenon: Implications for Improved Integrative Science in Trust Research

Description

Examinations of trust have advanced steadily over the past several decades, yielding important insights within criminal justice, economics, environmental studies, management and industrial organization, psychology, political science, and sociology. Cross-disciplinary approaches to the study of trust, however, have been limited

Examinations of trust have advanced steadily over the past several decades, yielding important insights within criminal justice, economics, environmental studies, management and industrial organization, psychology, political science, and sociology. Cross-disciplinary approaches to the study of trust, however, have been limited by differences in defining and measuring trust and in methodological approaches. In this chapter, we take the position that: 1) cross-disciplinary studies can be improved by recognizing trust as a multilevel phenomenon, and 2) context impacts the nature of trusting relations. We present an organizing framework for conceptualizing trust between trustees and trustors at person, group, and institution levels. The differences between these levels have theoretical implications for the study of trust and that might be used to justify distinctions in definitions and methodological approaches across settings. We highlight where the levels overlap and describe how this overlap has created confusion in the trust literature to date. Part of the overlap – and confusion – is the role of interpersonal trust at each level. We delineate when and how interpersonal trust is theoretically relevant to conceptualizing and measuring trust at each level and suggest that other trust-related constructs, such as perceived legitimacy, competence, and integrity, may be more important than interpersonal trust at some levels and in some contexts. Translating findings from trust research in one discipline to another and collaborating across disciplines may be facilitated if researchers ensure that their levels of conceptualization and measurement are aligned, and that models developed for a particular context are relevant in other, distinct contexts.

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Date Created
2016

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Tenderness expression as a signal for trustworthiness

Description

The present research expands on prior research that demonstrated a prototypical facial expression in response to cute, baby-like Kindchenschema targets. This expression, referred to as the tenderness expression, is recognizable to onlookers as a response to such stimuli. Across two

The present research expands on prior research that demonstrated a prototypical facial expression in response to cute, baby-like Kindchenschema targets. This expression, referred to as the tenderness expression, is recognizable to onlookers as a response to such stimuli. Across two studies, the current research examined if there were differences in perceptions of trustworthiness (Studies 1 and 2) and willingness to trust (Study 2) toward individuals displaying the tenderness expression as compared to a Duchenne smile or a neutral expression. Results indicate the tenderness expression is associated with lower ratings of trustworthiness relative to a smile, but no differences among the expressions on willingness to trust. Exploratory analyses demonstrate a replicated pattern of differences on the Big Five Personality Inventory among these three expressions. While these findings were not consistent with a priori hypotheses, this research provides further insight into the social implications associated with this tenderness expression.

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Date Created
2019