Matching Items (16)

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Does Online "Working Out Work" as a Treatment and Prevention for Depression in Older Adults?

Description

RESEARCH QUESTION: Does Online "Working Out Work" as a Treatment and Prevention for Depression in Older Adults? An Analysis of a Prescribed and Monitored Exercise Program Administered via the Internet

RESEARCH QUESTION: Does Online "Working Out Work" as a Treatment and Prevention for Depression in Older Adults? An Analysis of a Prescribed and Monitored Exercise Program Administered via the Internet for Senior Adults with Depression.
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to investigate and access the effectiveness of an online prescribed and monitored exercise program for the treatment of depression in Older Adults. The Dependent Variable for the study is Depression. The Independent Variable for the study is the Effects of Exercise administered via the Internet and the population is geriatric adults defined as senior adults aged 50 and older. Depression is defined by Princeton University Scholars (Wordnet, 2006) as a mental state characterized by a pessimistic sense of inadequacy and a despondent lack of activity.
METHODS: The presence and severity of depression will be assessed by using The Merck Manual of Geriatrics (GDS-15) Geriatric Depression Scale. Assessments will be performed at baseline, before and after the treatment is concluded. The subjects will complete the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q) prior to participating in an exercise program three times per week.
LIMITATIONS OF RESEARCH: The limitations of this study are: 1) There is a small sample size limited to Senior Adults aged 50 - 80, and 2) there is no control group with structured activity or placebo, therefore researcher is unable to evaluate if the marked improvement was due to a non-specific therapeutic effect associated with taking part in a social activity (group online exercise program). Further research could compare and analyze the positive effects of a muscular strength training exercise program verses a cardiovascular training exercise program.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011-05-02

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The energy cost of walking and cycling in young and older adults

Description

The effects of aging on muscular efficiency are controversial. Proponents for increased efficiency suggest that age-related changes in muscle enhance efficiency in senescence. Exercise study results are mixed due to

The effects of aging on muscular efficiency are controversial. Proponents for increased efficiency suggest that age-related changes in muscle enhance efficiency in senescence. Exercise study results are mixed due to varying modalities, ages, and efficiency calculations. The present study attempted to address oxygen uptake, caloric expenditure, walking economy, and gross
et cycling efficiency in young (18-59 years old) and older (60-81 years old) adults (N=444). Walking was performed at three miles per hour by 86 young (mean = 29.60, standard deviation (SD) = 10.50 years old) and 121 older adults (mean = 66.80, SD = 4.50 years old). Cycling at 50 watts (60-70 revolutions per minute) was performed by 116 young (mean= 29.00, SD= 10.00 years old) and 121 older adults (m = 67.10 SD = 4.50 years old). Steady-state sub-maximal gross
et oxygen uptake and caloric expenditures from each activity and rest were analyzed. Net walking economy was represented by net caloric expenditure (kilocalories/kilogram/min). Cycling measures included percent gross
et cycling efficiency (kilo-calorie derived). Linear regressions were used to assess each measure as a function of age. Differences in age group means were assessed using independent t-tests for each modality (alpha = 0.05). No significant differences in mean oxygen uptake nor walking economy were found between young and older walkers (p>0.05). Older adults performing cycle ergometry demonstrated lower gross
et oxygen uptakes and lower gross caloric expenditures (p< 0.05).

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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A feasibility study of Tai Chi Easy for spousally bereaved older adults

Description

Spousal bereavement is one of the most stressful life events, resulting in increased morbidities and mortality risk. Negative health outcomes include depressive episodes, anxiety, sleep disruption, and overall poorer physical

Spousal bereavement is one of the most stressful life events, resulting in increased morbidities and mortality risk. Negative health outcomes include depressive episodes, anxiety, sleep disruption, and overall poorer physical health. The older adult population is rapidly increasing and over 30% of the US population 65 years and older are widowed. Current studies regarding older adults and spousal bereavement treatment have been limited to psychological and educational interventions. Meditative movement practices (e.g. Tai Chi) have shown benefits such as mood elevation, anxiety reduction, and other physical function improvements. A feasibility study applying an 8-week Tai Chi Easy intervention was examined to address the sequelae of spousal bereavement among adults 65 and older. Grounded in geriatric nursing as a discipline that addresses the unique needs of older adults' psychological and physiological health needs and related theoretical constructs, this project also draws from exercise science, mental health, and social psychology. Theoretical premises include Orem's Self Care Deficit Theory (nursing), Stroebe and Schut's Dual Process Model (thanatology), and Peter Salmon's Unifying Theory (exercise). Aims of the study examined feasibility as well as pre-post-intervention changes in grief, and the degree of loss orientation relative to restoration orientation (Inventory of Daily Widowed Life). A trend in the direction of improvement was found in measured subscales, as well as a statistically significant change within the loss orientation subscale. Based upon these encouraging findings, effect sizes may be used to power a future larger study of similar nature.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Music intervention to prevent delirium among older patients admitted to a Trauma Intensive Care Unit and a Trauma Orthopedic Unit

Description

Greater than half of older adults who are admitted to an acute care setting experience delirium with an estimated cost between four to twenty billion dollars annually in the United

Greater than half of older adults who are admitted to an acute care setting experience delirium with an estimated cost between four to twenty billion dollars annually in the United States. As a strategy to address the gap between research and practice, this feasibility study used the Roy Adaptation Model to provide a theoretical perspective for intervention design and evaluation, with a focus on modifying contextual stimuli in a Trauma Intensive Care and a Trauma Orthopedic Unit setting. The study sample included older hospitalized patients in a Trauma Intensive Care and a Trauma Orthopedic setting where there is a greater incidence for delirium. Study participants included two groups, with one group assigned to receive either a music intervention or usual care. The music intervention included pre-recorded music, delivered using an iPod player with soft headsets, with music self-selected from a collection of music compositions with musical elements of slow tempo and simple repetitive rhythm that influence delirium prevention. For the proposed study a music intervention dose included intervention delivery for 60 minutes, twice a day, over a three day period following admission. Physiologic variables measured included systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate, which were electronically monitored every four hours for the study. The Confusion Assessment Method was used as a screening tool to identify delirium in the admitted patients. Specific aims of this feasibility study were to (a) examine the feasibility of a music intervention designed to prevent delirium among older adults, and (b) evaluate the effects of a music intervention designed to prevent delirium among older adults. Findings indicate there was a significant music group by time interaction effect which suggests that change over time was different for the music and usual care group.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Muscle quality, muscle mass, muscle strength, and pulse wave velocity between healthy young and elderly adults

Description

Although maintaining an optimal level of muscle quality in older persons is necessary to prevent falls and disability, there has been limited research on muscle quality across age and gender

Although maintaining an optimal level of muscle quality in older persons is necessary to prevent falls and disability, there has been limited research on muscle quality across age and gender groups. The associations of muscle quality, muscle strength, and muscle mass also remain less explored. Purpose: This study examined the muscle quality differences (arm and leg) between healthy young and elderly adults across gender groups. This study also examined the associations of muscle quality, muscle strength, and muscle mass in young and elderly adults, respectively. Methods: Seventy-one total subjects were recruited for this study within age groups 20-29 years old (20 females and 20 males) and 60-80 years old (18 females and 13 males). All participants completed anthropometric measures, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, pulse wave velocity, handgrip strength and leg strength tests, gait speed, and sit to stand test. Results: Young male adults had a greater leg muscle quality index (leg MQI) than did elderly male adults (21.8 Nm/kg vs. 16.3 Nm/kg, p = 0.001). Similarly, young female adults had a greater leg MQI than did old female adults (21.3 Nm/kg and 15.6 Nm/kg, p<0.001). For arm muscle quality index (arm MQI), there was a gender difference in young adults (p = 0.001), but not for the elderly adults. Among elderly adults, there was a positive association between leg MQI and isometric leg strength (r = 0.79, p<0.001). Notably, there was a negative association between leg MQI and leg lean mass (r = -0.70, p<0.001) and between arm MQI and arm lean mass (r = -0.58, p = 0.001). In young adults, there was also a positive association between arm MQI and handgrip strength (r = 0.53, p<0.001) and between leg MQI and isometric leg strength (r = 0.81, p<0.001). There was no association between muscle quality and muscle mass in young adults. Conclusion: Young adults had a greater leg muscle quality than did elderly adults in both men and women. Leg muscle quality is positively associated with leg muscle strength in both young and elderly adults but is inversely associated with leg muscle mass in the elderly adults.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Feasibility Study of the Health Empowerment Intervention to Evaluate the Effect on Self-Management, Functional Health, and Well-Being in Older Adults with Heart Failure

Description

ABSTRACT

The population of older adults in the United States is growing disproportionately, with corresponding medical, social and economic implications. The number of Americans 65 years and older constitutes 13.7% of

ABSTRACT

The population of older adults in the United States is growing disproportionately, with corresponding medical, social and economic implications. The number of Americans 65 years and older constitutes 13.7% of the U.S. population, and is expected to grow to 21% by 2040. As the adults age, they are at risk for developing chronic illness and disability. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 5.7 million Americans have heart failure, and almost 80% of these are 65 years and older. The prevalence of heart failure will increase with the increase in aging population, thus increasing the costs associated with heart failure from 34.7 billion dollars in 2010 to 77.7 billion dollars by 2020. Of all cardiovascular hospitalizations, 28.9% are due to heart failure, and almost 60,000 deaths are accounted for heart failure. Marked disparities in heart failure persist within and between population subgroups. Living with heart failure is challenging for older adults, because being a chronic condition, the responsibility of day to day management of heart failure principally rests with patient. Approaches to improve self-management are targeted at adherence, compliance, and physiologic variables, little attention has been paid to personal and social contextual resources of older adults, crucial for decision making, and purposeful participation in goal attainment, representing a critical area for intervention. Several strategies based on empowerment perspective are focused on outcomes; paying less attention to the process. To address these gaps between research and practice, this feasibility study was guided by a tested theory, the Theory of Health Empowerment, to optimize self-management, functional health and well-being in older adults with heart failure. The study sample included older adults with heart failure attending senior centers. Specific aims of this feasibility study were to: (a) examine the feasibility of the Health Empowerment Intervention in older adults with heart failure, (b) evaluate the effect of the health empowerment intervention on self-management, functional health, and well-being among older adults with heart failure. The Health Empowerment Intervention was delivered focusing on strategies to identify and building upon self-capacity, and supportive social network, informed decision making and goal setting, and purposefully participating in the attainment of personal health goals for well-being. Study was feasible and significantly increased personal growth, and purposeful participation in the attainment of personal health goals.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Identifying needs of older adults with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias in a rehabilitation setting: perceptions of formal and informal caregivers

Description

The purpose of this study is to identify the needs of older adults with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias (ADRD) admitted to a rehabilitation setting where they are expected

The purpose of this study is to identify the needs of older adults with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias (ADRD) admitted to a rehabilitation setting where they are expected to physically and mentally function to their optimal level of health. To date, no studies have identified the needs and concerns of ADRD patients in rehabilitation settings. The Needs-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior (NDB) Model, the researcher's clinical experience, and the state of the current scientific literature will help guide the study. An exploratory qualitative research approach was employed to gather data and discover new information about the ADRD patient's needs and related behavioral outcomes. The qualitative findings on the discrepancies and similarities in perceptions of ADRD patient needs were obtained by examining formal and informal caregivers' perceptions. The researcher recruited registered nurses and certified nurse assistants (RNs and CNAs, formal) and family/friends (informal) who have provided care to patients in inpatient rehabilitation facilities to participate in focus groups and individualized focused interviews. The data were collated and analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. The overarching theme that developed as a result of this approach revealed discordant perceptions and expectations of ADRD patients' needs between the formal and informal caregivers with six subthemes: communication and information, family involvement, rehabilitation nurse philosophy, nursing care, belonging, and patient outcomes. The researcher provided recommendations to help support these needs. These findings will help guide the development of nurse-lead interventions for ADRD patients in a rehabilitation setting.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Dyadic outcomes of gratitude exchange between family caregivers and their siblings

Description

Family caregivers are a quickly growing population in American society and are potentially vulnerable to a number of risks to well-being. High stress and little support can combine to cause

Family caregivers are a quickly growing population in American society and are potentially vulnerable to a number of risks to well-being. High stress and little support can combine to cause difficulties in personal and professional relationships, physical health, and emotional health. Siblings are, however, a possible source of protection for the at-risk caregiver. This study examines the relational and health outcomes of gratitude exchange between caregivers and their siblings as they attend to the issue of caring for aging parents. Dyadic data was collected through an online survey and was analyzed using a series of Actor-Partner Interdependence Models. Intimacy and care conflict both closely relate to gratitude exchange, but the most significant variable influencing gratitude was role. Specifically, caregivers are neither experiencing nor expressing gratitude on the same level as their siblings. Expressed gratitude did not relate strongly or consistently to well-being variables, though it did relate to diminished negative affect. Implications for theory, the caregiver, the sibling, the elder, the practitioner, and the researcher are addressed in the discussion.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Music Therapy Program for Geriatric Patients Diagnosed with Serious Mental Illness: A Dalcroze and Wellness Approach

Description

Older adults diagnosed with a serious mental illness (SMI) often face a lifetime of psychiatric institutionalization, making them a very vulnerable population. However, music therapy research has not been conducted

Older adults diagnosed with a serious mental illness (SMI) often face a lifetime of psychiatric institutionalization, making them a very vulnerable population. However, music therapy research has not been conducted with this specific population. The purpose of this thesis was to develop an evidence-based proposed music therapy program for geriatric patients diagnosed with SMI utilizing both music-based and non-music based theoretical frameworks. The music-based approach used for the program is Dalcroze and the non-music based approach is Wellness with a focus on quality of life. The population diagnosed with SMI and the complications of aging for this population are discussed as well as the results of previous music therapy studies conducted with adults diagnosed with SMI. The components of the Dalcroze and Wellness approaches are described and the elements that are incorporated into the program include improvisation and eurhythmics and client strengths and the physical domain (movement). The proposed music therapy program will have the therapeutic goals of increased social interaction, increased self-esteem, and increased quality of life. The data collection tools are mentioned and how to measure results. The program is described in detail with session plans consisting of warm-up, improvisation, movement, and closing interventions. The recommendations for clinical evidence-based practice are discussed.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Utilization of community space in affordable housing and assisted living: design recommendations for a new housing typology

Description

The United States elderly population is becoming increasingly larger, there is a need for a more adequate housing type to accommodate this population. It is estimated that by 2020, there

The United States elderly population is becoming increasingly larger, there is a need for a more adequate housing type to accommodate this population. It is estimated that by 2020, there will be a need for approximately 1.6 to 2.9 million units of affordable Assisted Living (Blake, 2005). With limited income and higher health bills, adequate housing becomes a low priority. It is estimated that 7.1 million elderly households have serious housing problems. (Blake, 2005) The scope of this research will look at literature, case studies, and interviews to begin to create and understand the necessary design aspects of Assisted Living and Affordable Housing to better create a housing typology that includes both low income residents and Assisted Living needs. This research hopes to have an outcome of Design Recommendations that can be utilized by designers when designing for an Affordable Assisted Living typology.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014