Matching Items (9)

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Para Mi Alma for Chamber Wind Ensemble

Description

Para Mi Alma is a composition for chamber wind ensemble comprised of an Introduction, two dance movements, and a concluding movement featuring the full ensemble in a chorale-like finale. This

Para Mi Alma is a composition for chamber wind ensemble comprised of an Introduction, two dance movements, and a concluding movement featuring the full ensemble in a chorale-like finale. This piece follows the narrative of an abusive relationship, and the emotional rollercoaster that one experiences during the self extrication and consequential rebirth of identity. Para Mi Alma (For My Soul) is scored for chamber wind ensemble with the following instrumentation: piccolo/flute, Bb clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon; soprano, tenor, and baritone saxophone; trumpet, trumpet/flugelhorn, horn in F, tenor and bass trombone; double bass, and three percussionists - marimba/congas, auxiliary percussion (wind chimes, suspended cymbal, triangle, bass drum, snare drum, double cowbell, tam-tam), and timpani/timbales. The duration of this work is approximately 11’00”.

Each movement portrays a stage in the relationship, and the mental state of the person experiencing abuse. The Introduction begins with a piccolo solo and marimba accompaniment, and gradually builds to the full ensemble; this section of music illustrates the moment that relational ties to the transgressor are cut — a split second of clarity and space before the spiral of anxiety and overwhelming thoughts of self deprecation invade. Movement I is a salsa, representing the dance of two people entering into a relationship. The meter changes and hemiolas serve to upset the underlying groove and create rhythmic tension, while the surface of the music appears unscathed. Finally the dance is interrupted by an aggressive bass solo, which initiates the transition to Movement II. This transition serves to remind the listener of the Introduction, and the dissolution of the relationship; it is characterized by chaos and confused clusters of melodic lines and dissonant harmonies. Movement II is a tango, representative of the emotional extremes of heartbreak, anger, confusion, and shame. The conclusion of the Tango directly segues into Movement III, which features a short brass chorale before building to include the full ensemble. Movement III portrays the support system of family and friends, and personifies the collective effort that takes place in healing and growth.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Convergences: op. 28a for woodwinds, brass, percussion and piano by Marlos Nobre : a new performance edition and analysis

Description

Convergences, one of the best known orchestral pieces by Marlos Nobre, was originally written in 1968 and scored for winds, percussion and piano; however, that version was neither performed nor

Convergences, one of the best known orchestral pieces by Marlos Nobre, was originally written in 1968 and scored for winds, percussion and piano; however, that version was neither performed nor published. Upon contacting the composer, the author learned that there was no performance-ready edition available. The purpose of this project, therefore, was to create a performance edition of Convergences Op. 28a by Marlos Nobre; to lead the premiere performance of the original version of the work; and to provide potential future performers with a descriptive analysis of the work, along with biographical information about the composer. After receiving revisions from the composer, the author created a new score, using a music notation program; the score appears at the end of this document. Additionally, performance parts were extracted from the new score. The analytical portion of this paper discusses the structure of the three movements (Vivo, Adagio, Vivo), their interrelationships, and the organic use of motivic transformation that binds the movements together. The work is approximately twenty-one minutes long and is scored for a small wind ensemble comprising: flute/piccolo, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, trumpet, trombone, bass trombone, six percussionists, and piano.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Symphonic movement: on works of H. P. Lovecraft

Description

Symphonic Movement: On Works of H. P. Lovecraft is a single movement

composition for wind band lasting approximately 11 minutes. The instrumentation

for the work is as follows: piccolo, 2 flutes, 2

Symphonic Movement: On Works of H. P. Lovecraft is a single movement

composition for wind band lasting approximately 11 minutes. The instrumentation

for the work is as follows: piccolo, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, English horn, 3 clarinets, bass

clarinet, contrabass clarinet, 2 bassoons, contrabassoon, soprano saxophone, alto

saxophone, tenor saxophone, baritone saxophone, 4 horns, 4 trumpets, 2 trombones,

bass trombone, euphonium, tuba, string bass, timpani, 5 percussionists, and piano.

Symphonic Movement: On Works of H. P. Lovecraft is inspired by the horror

fiction writer H. P. Lovecraft. Lovecraft was famous for his ability to create a sense

of creeping dread and terror in his stories. The composition evokes this dark

atmosphere and uses a combination of melodic, harmonic, and orchestrational

devices to imitate this ambience.

The primary musical material of the work is a melody consisting of all twelve

tones. The composition explores this melody through motivic development and

phrase segmentation derived from the source material. This heavy use of

chromaticism helps to create a dissonant and brooding atmosphere throughout. The

work fluctuates between soft, lyrical passages and loud, cacophonous sections. The

alternation of exposed melodic lines with large bombastic climaxes is a major

component of the overall structure of the composition.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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An Annotated Guide to Twenty-First Century Wind Chamber Music

Description

Arnold Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire, written in 1912 for an ensemble of flute, clarinet, piano, violin, cello, and voice
arrator (with certain instrumental doublings), has, since its premiere, greatly influenced composers

Arnold Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire, written in 1912 for an ensemble of flute, clarinet, piano, violin, cello, and voice
arrator (with certain instrumental doublings), has, since its premiere, greatly influenced composers writing chamber music. In fact, this particular instrumentation has become known as the “Pierrot Ensemble,” with variations on Schoenberg’s creation used by Igor Stravinsky, Luciano Berio, and many other composers.

There are many resources devoted to music for chamber winds composed during the twentieth century, including those inspired by Schoenberg’s configuration. Additionally, many sources have comprehensively covered known chamber music composed before 1900. However, there is very little research dedicated to chamber wind music composed since 2000.

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the body of research about the music by: 1) creating an annotated bibliography of 21st century wind chamber music.; and 2) thereby catalyzing the discovery of recently composed wind chamber music. Moreover, I hope to address and encourage diversity through my research. To that end, the Composer’s Diversity Database was used as a primary resource for discovering compositions written since 2000 for wind/percussion-based ensembles comprising six to thirteen players.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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American primitive: for wind ensemble

Description

American Primitive is a composition written for wind ensemble with an instrumentation of flute, oboe, clarinet, bass clarinet, alto, tenor, and baritone saxophones, trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium, tuba, piano, and

American Primitive is a composition written for wind ensemble with an instrumentation of flute, oboe, clarinet, bass clarinet, alto, tenor, and baritone saxophones, trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium, tuba, piano, and percussion. The piece is approximately twelve minutes in duration and was written September - December 2013. American Primitive is absolute music (i.e. it does not follow a specific narrative) comprising blocks of distinct, contrasting gestures which bookend a central region of delicate textural layering and minimal gestural contrast. Though three gestures (a descending interval followed by a smaller ascending interval, a dynamic swell, and a chordal "chop") were consciously employed throughout, it is the first gesture of the three that creates a sense of unification and overall coherence to the work. Additionally, the work challenges listeners' expectations of traditional wind ensemble music by featuring the trumpet as a quasi-soloist whose material is predominately inspired by transcriptions of jazz solos. This jazz-inspired material is at times mimicked and further developed by the ensemble, also often in a soloistic manner while the trumpet maintains its role throughout. This interplay of dialogue between the "soloists" and the "ensemble" further skews listeners' conceptions of traditional wind ensemble music by featuring almost every instrument in the ensemble. Though the term "American Primitive" is usually associated with the "naïve art" movement, it bears no association to the music presented in this work. Instead, the term refers to the author's own compositional attitudes, education, and aesthetic interests.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

Delirium

Description

Delirium is a piece for large wind ensemble that synthesizes compositional techniques to generate unique juxtapositions of contrasting musical elements. The piece is about 8:30 long and uses the full

Delirium is a piece for large wind ensemble that synthesizes compositional techniques to generate unique juxtapositions of contrasting musical elements. The piece is about 8:30 long and uses the full complement of winds, brass, and percussion. Although the composition begins tonally, chromatic alterations gradually shift the melodic content outside of the tonal center. In addition to changes in the melody, octatonic, chromatic, and synthetic scales and quartal and quintal harmonies are progressively introduced throughout the piece to add color and create dissonance. Delirium contains four primary sections that are all related by chromatic mediant. The subdivisions of the first part create abrupt transitions between contrasting material, evocative of the symptoms of delirium. As each sub-section progresses, the A minor tonality of the opening gradually gives way to increased chromaticism and dissonance. The next area transitions to C minor and begins to feature octatonic scales, secundal harmonies, and chromatic flourishes more prominently. The full sound of the ensemble then drops to solo instruments in the third section, now in G# minor, where the elements of the previous section are built upon with the addition of synthetic scales and quartal harmonies. The last division, before the recapitulation of the opening material, provides a drastic change in atmosphere as the chromatic elements from before are removed and the tense sound of the quartal harmonies are replaced with quintal sonorities and a more tonal melody. The tonality of this final section is used to return to the opening material. After an incomplete recapitulation, the descending motive that is used throughout the piece, which can be found in measure 61 in the flutes, is inverted and layered by minor 3rds. This inverted figure builds to the same sonority found in measure138, before ending on an F# chord, a minor third away from the A minor tonal center of the opening and where the piece seems like it should end.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Concerto for two horns in E-flat major attributed to Joseph Haydn: a new arrangement for wind ensemble

Description

A new arrangement of the Concerto for Two Horns in E-flat Major, Hob. VIId/6, attributed by some to Franz Joseph Haydn, is presented here. The arrangement reduces the orchestral portion

A new arrangement of the Concerto for Two Horns in E-flat Major, Hob. VIId/6, attributed by some to Franz Joseph Haydn, is presented here. The arrangement reduces the orchestral portion to ten wind instruments, specifically a double wind quintet, to facilitate performance of the work. A full score and a complete set of parts are included. In support of this new arrangement, a discussion of the early treatment of horns in pairs and the subsequent development of the double horn concerto in the eighteenth century provides historical context for the Concerto for Two Horns in E-flat major. A summary of the controversy concerning the identity of the composer of this concerto is followed by a description of the content and structure of each of its three movements. Some comments on the procedures of the arrangement complete the background information.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011