Matching Items (33)

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Piano chamber music of the Second New England School: a study guide

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American music of late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries represents some of the first mature achievements in classical music written by American composers.John Knowles Paine (1839-1906), Arthur Foote (1853-1937), George Whitefield

American music of late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries represents some of the first mature achievements in classical music written by American composers.John Knowles Paine (1839-1906), Arthur Foote (1853-1937), George Whitefield Chadwick (1854-1931), Horatio Parker (1868-1919), and Amy Beach (1867-1944) from the Second New England School were among the most prominent musical figures in America during this time period. These composers shared similar compositional characteristics, perhaps due to the profound influences of German Romantic tradition, either through their direct study with musicians in Germany or with professional German-trained musicians in America.They were active in Boston, affiliated with important music organizations, and had publications through A. P. Schmidt, the most important music publisher of that time. Piano chamber music of the Second New England School is a small but important portion of their diverse repertoire. It is generally considered the first successful body of such repertoire by American composers. Even though most of these works were premiered to great acclaim during the composers' lifetimes, many of them no longer have place in current recital programs and very few are available to the public in published or recorded form. The purpose of this study is to reintroduce this important and worthwhile literature to today's audience. For the purpose of this study the repertoire will be limited to music that involves at least three performers, one of whom must be a pianist. The repertoire must be originally composed for a piano chamber group and must have been published or performed at least once during the composer's lifetime. While Edward MacDowell (1860-1908) is generally considered a member of the Second New England School, he surprisingly did not write any piano chamber music, and therefore has no works in this study. This research project will provide general background information about each composer and their piano chamber music, and a closer examination of one particularly representative work or movement, including performance guidelines from the collaborative pianist's point of view. The author's hope is to awaken greater curiosity about this rich repertoire and to increase its presence on the concert stage.

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Date Created
  • 2012

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Armenian folk elements in Arno Babajanian's Piano trio in f-sharp minor

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Armenian music has a rich history. It started as independent, monodic song, and succeeded in keeping its uniqueness from the influences of other countries' musical traditions. During the nineteenth century

Armenian music has a rich history. It started as independent, monodic song, and succeeded in keeping its uniqueness from the influences of other countries' musical traditions. During the nineteenth century the great Armenian musicologist and composer Komitas started to travel and write down these songs from Armenian villages. Komitas, who had higher education in Western classical music, was one of the first composers to harmonize Armenian songs and sacred music using Western classical techniques. This was a milestone in the development of Armenian music. Arno Babajanian was a Soviet Armenian composer who, like Komitas, was interested in the combinations of Armenian folk and Western classical traditions. This document provides a formal and harmonic analysis of his Piano Trio in F-Sharp Minor, written in 1952. By identifying Armenian folk tunes used in his trio, I will demonstrate that Babajanian achieved interesting results by inserting exotic Armenian folk melodies, harmonies, and other elements into the Western classical sonata form. This document also points out the influence of other composers of the Soviet era on Babajanian's music. By combining Armenian folk and western classical elements in his Piano Trio, Babajanian created a piece that resonates with native Armenians and classical music lovers and deserves a place in the violin repertoire.

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Date Created
  • 2016

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The Fusion of Cantonese Music with Western Composition Techniques: Tunes from My Home Trio for Violin, Cello, and Piano by Chen Yi

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ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to analyze Tunes from My Home, a Trio for Violin, Cello, and Piano by Chinese-American composer Chen Yi (b. 1953), as well as

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to analyze Tunes from My Home, a Trio for Violin, Cello, and Piano by Chinese-American composer Chen Yi (b. 1953), as well as to provide a performance guide from a collaborative pianist's perspective. Of Cantonese origin herself, Chen Yi composed several works inspired by Cantonese music, including this trio. Chen Yi composed this trio between 2007 and 2008 and dedicated it to her long time friend pianist Pan Xun, who is also of Cantonese origin. Inspired by this shared Cantonese heritage, Chen Yi incorporated within this work three well-known Cantonese tunes, Cantonese instrumental techniques and sonorities, and elements of the shifan luogu, a wind and percussion ensemble often used in traditional Cantonese music. Coming from the same region as the composer, the author of this paper feels connected with this piece, and as a collaborative pianist, has the opportunity to introduce Cantonese music to a wider audience through the piano trio. Chapter one introduces the motivation for this study. Chapter two provides a brief biography of Chen Yi. Chapter three introduces the history, the scales, and the instruments of Cantonese music as well as other Cantonese influences on this trio, especially the three tunes. Chapter four includes a detailed analysis of each movement in terms of the form and application of the tunes and rhythms of Cantonese music. Chapter five shares the author’s experience of approaching and interpreting this piece in an appropriate style based on her Cantonese roots. The conclusion evaluates the significance of the fusion of Cantonese music with Western compositional techniques in this piece.

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Date Created
  • 2017