Matching Items (9)

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From clients to caseworkers: women of color in the nonprofit sector

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ABSTRACT

As a graduate student earning both a Master of Arts in Social Justice and Human Rights and a Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Leadership Management, I have tried to bridge the

ABSTRACT

As a graduate student earning both a Master of Arts in Social Justice and Human Rights and a Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Leadership Management, I have tried to bridge the theoretical and the empirical in a meaningful way. A problematic chasm between the nonprofit professional and the client being served existed, and I wanted to research this chasm. I wanted to understand what challenges a woman of color faced if she was both a client and a nonprofit professional, possessing dual identities and engaging in a sort of welfare system border crossing. There was a gap in the academic research on women in the nonprofit sector, more specifically the charitable, human services sector, and there was little to no research on women who have been both clients and caseworkers. Therefore, I conducted a series five of in-depth, semi-structured interviews with women of color working at a local food bank. As an employee of the food bank, I recorded my own observations and field notes in order to write a feminist institutional ethnography. I employed interpretive, less conventional design methods, which were aligned with my commitment to social justice. The research highlighted many negative stories about oppression and exclusion women faced in the nonprofit sector. It also confronted the problematic stereotype welfare recipients, specifically women of color, are faced with as a result of the politics of disgust and dominant myth of the Welfare Queen. The research sought to explain how and why women of color transition in and out of the welfare state, and how they manage to work within a food bank, where they are constantly surrounded by inequalities.

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Date Created
  • 2015

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Divergent aging: an exploration of successful aging paradigms and unique factors that impact diverse women

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This research examined successful aging in a convenience sample of 14 women in Phoenix, Arizona. The study used a mixed methods approach involving individual interviews and administration of a standardized

This research examined successful aging in a convenience sample of 14 women in Phoenix, Arizona. The study used a mixed methods approach involving individual interviews and administration of a standardized instrument designed to measure success using an alternative construct, gerotranscendence. Explorative questions were designed to gather data regarding diverse women's lived experiences. In order to examine the impact of lived experiences on successful aging, demographics were collected and participants were administered the gerotranscendence scale further revised. Findings reveal that when success is conceptualized using gerotranscendence theory, women of color may still appear less successful than their white counterparts. Narratives yielded rich data regarding the influence of factors such as care giving and violated expectations. This research helps to expand the knowledge base on factors that impact successful aging of diverse women. This research contributes to the field of social work by providing insight into the complex factors that impact diverse woman, which may aid in the empowerment of social workers to advocate for more effective macro interventions for diverse older women.

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Date Created
  • 2013