Matching Items (14)

The Experience of International Service Learning: Project Vietnam

Description

International Service Devils (ISD) is a non-profit volunteer program established and run by students at Arizona State University, Polytechnic Campus. Since 2013, International Service Devils has volunteered in Costa Rica,

International Service Devils (ISD) is a non-profit volunteer program established and run by students at Arizona State University, Polytechnic Campus. Since 2013, International Service Devils has volunteered in Costa Rica, Guatemala, and India. This blog, written by Kali Richmond and myself, shares the experience of how we as students are establishing a new volunteer program in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. We have described in an entertaining fashion, our entire learning process from the brainstorming and organizing to the results of the trip itself. This includes the struggles that we had to overcome with planning and finances, as well as crediting the people and organizations who helped us along the way to overcome those obstacles. We established 2 volunteer projects as well as completed multiple community analyses for the possibility of starting a school and providing scholarships to deserving children through the Young Dreamer Network. This blog is accompanied by an approximately 15 minute video of footage and photos taken during our time in Vietnam. The video shows both the volunteer aspect as well as some of the cultural experiences that we experienced. The purpose of this documentation is to encourage international service learning as a source of experience and education for University students, and to show plausibility of setting goals similar to ours and being able to achieve them. We hope that our writing can help students get an idea of what it takes to be a leader in international service learning programs, and that our experience can help prove the worth of volunteering abroad. We want to inspire fellow students to travel with the mission to learn from wherever they go and be able to give back to those communities, as this has provided us with immense personal growth and new perspectives on education and culture.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Guatemala and the United States: The Development of Undocumented Youth Immigration

Description

This project is to help Guatemalan youth immigrants by providing them with the information necessary to access support in the United States, and obtainin legal status in the United States.

This project is to help Guatemalan youth immigrants by providing them with the information necessary to access support in the United States, and obtainin legal status in the United States. In order to produce a brochure with this information, it was necessary to research the political, economic, and social history of Guatemala in order to determine what struggles citizens are facing, and specifically what experiences youth in the country have prior to their journey to the United States. This research is culminated into a paper that discusses the history, the causes of emigration from Guatemala, and the status of youth immigrants before they leave Guatemala and once they arrive in the United States.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

The Social Impact of a Guatemalan School for Mayan Women.

Description

The purpose of this project is to use powerful visual storytelling techniques to convey a social need and an effective solution. Guatemala is a third world country, where poverty is

The purpose of this project is to use powerful visual storytelling techniques to convey a social need and an effective solution. Guatemala is a third world country, where poverty is widespread and the birth rate is high. Among the most economically and educationally disadvantaged are the Mayan women. Arizona nun, Sister Marife Hellman, recognized the needs of this population and founded a school to serve them. Hellman's mission is to provide a quality education to those underserved, so they can become positive leaders in their native communities. The website and video materials produced for this thesis are meant to be used for fundraising purposes on behalf of the school. All funds raised will help Hellman's alumni launch schools in their native areas, giving access to education that has long been nonexistent. Watch the mini-documentary here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxTiuwQCH44&t=17s.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

The Experience of International Service Learning: Project Vietnam

Description

Abstract: International Service Devils (ISD) is a non-profit volunteer program established and run by students at Arizona State University, Polytechnic Campus. Since 2013, International Service Devils has volunteered in Costa

Abstract: International Service Devils (ISD) is a non-profit volunteer program established and run by students at Arizona State University, Polytechnic Campus. Since 2013, International Service Devils has volunteered in Costa Rica, Guatemala, and India. This blog, written by Kali Richmond and myself, shares the experience of how we as students have established a new volunteer program in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. We have described in an entertaining fashion, our entire learning process from the brainstorming and organizing, to the results of the trip itself. This includes the struggles that we had to overcome with planning and finances, as well as crediting the people and organizations who helped us along the way to overcome those obstacles. We established 2 volunteer projects as well as completed multiple community analyses for the possibility of starting a school and providing scholarships to deserving children through the Young Dreamer Network. This blog is accompanied by an approximately 15 minute video of footage and photos taken during our time in Vietnam. The video shows both the volunteer aspect as well as some of the cultural experiences that we experienced. The purpose of this documentation is to encourage international service learning as a source of experience and education for University students, and to show plausibility of setting goals similar to ours and being able to achieve them. We hope that our writing can help students get an idea of what it takes to be a leader in international service learning programs, and that our experience can help prove the worth of volunteering abroad. We want to inspire fellow students to travel with the mission to learn from wherever they go and be able to give back to those communities, as this has provided us with immense personal growth and new perspectives on education and culture.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Analyzing Hygiene Stigma in Rural Guatemala: A Quantitative Study

Description

Previous research on shame and stigma has demonstrated that undesired differences can lead to community divides and produce harmful stereotypes in communities. This is particularly true in the context of

Previous research on shame and stigma has demonstrated that undesired differences can lead to community divides and produce harmful stereotypes in communities. This is particularly true in the context of hygiene, where shame has been used to try and produce better hygiene, and instead has led to increased levels of hygiene stigma in communities. As part of the 2015 Global Ethnohydrology Study, we asked 66 respondents from rural Guatemala questions about their hygiene behaviors and beliefs. The hygiene behavior data was statistically analyzed in order to test for correlation and differences between different demographics such as gender and age. There are significant differences between both gender and age in relation to hygiene behavior and practices. Gender was the stronger determinant of positive hygiene behavior. Using the definitions of stigma from literature, the results of the hygiene behaviors measured were contextualized in order to form conclusions about hygiene stigma overall in Guatemala.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Cross-Cultural Perceptions of Health Implications From Wastewater Reuse

Description

The study examines cross-cultural perceptions of wastewater reuse from 282 participants from four global sites representing varied levels of socio-economic and political development from the Global North and Global South:

The study examines cross-cultural perceptions of wastewater reuse from 282 participants from four global sites representing varied levels of socio-economic and political development from the Global North and Global South: Spain, New Zealand, Fiji, and Guatemala. The data comes from the Global Ethnohydrology Survey conducted by the School of Human Evolution and Social Change during the summer of 2013. The Global Ethnohydrology Study is a transdisciplinary multi-year research initiative that examines the range of variation in local ecological knowledge of water issues, also known as "ethnohydrology." Participants were asked about their willingness, level of disgust, and concern with using treated wastewater for various daily activities. Additionally, they were asked to draw schematic representations of how wastewater should be treated to become drinkable again. Using visual content analysis, the drawings were coded for a variety of treatment levels and specific treatment processes. Conclusions about the perceived health implications from wastewater reuse that can stem from drinking treated wastewater were made. The relationship between humans and wastewater is one that has many direct social and health impacts on communities at large. In reaction to global limitations of freshwater, wastewater serves as a valuable resource to tap into. This research examines the cross-cultural public health concerns about treated wastewater in order to draw conclusions that can aid in strategic implementation of advocacy and public education about wastewater reuse.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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FAT STIGMA AND THE SKINNY IDEAL: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE INTERNALIZATION AND EXPRESSION OF BODY NORMS AMONG AMERICAN VERSUS GUATEMALAN ADOLESCENTS

Description

Fat-stigma has become a popular topic of research in recent years as obesity and Western ideals have made their way around the globe. Previous studies have found that the internalization

Fat-stigma has become a popular topic of research in recent years as obesity and Western ideals have made their way around the globe. Previous studies have found that the internalization and expression of body norms can vary dramatically depending on location, gender, and many other cultural factors. Differing levels of body satisfaction have been linked to the internalization of these norms, and the development of low body esteem can result in many physical and emotional problems. Although there is an abundance of research on the topic of fat-stigma, few studies have investigated the related, but seemingly independent, topic of the ideal thin body. Furthermore, limited research has looked directly at body size stereotypes in Guatemala, and those that have, focused solely on Guatemala City. Furthermore, no previous cross-cultural analyses were found comparing body norms among US and rural Guatemalan adolescents. By surveying 9-10 year old students in Acatenango, Guatemala and Phoenix, Arizona, this study compared the preferences as well as stereotypes for average, thin, and fat body sizes in these two contexts. The results of this study illustrate a contrast between a fat-negative and a thin-negative culture, and highlight the complexity of the emergence of body norms around the world. We find that, in contrast to previous studies, neither the western ideal thin body nor obesity stereotypes have been internalized in Acatenango. Furthermore, negative evaluations of fat bodies and positive evaluations of thin bodies seem to be made independently of each other. Americans had a much higher prejudice against fat children and were more likely to be thin-positive (OR=1.997), while Guatemalans were more likely to be thin-negative. On average, the American students were much more polarized in their judgments on different body sizes, and experienced greater levels of body dissatisfaction. Finally, American students favored an ideal figure over one size smaller than Guatemalan students. Results suggest that there are still rural communities that have not been entirely affected by the spread of western body norms.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

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The Science of Water Art: Children's Perspectives on Water and the Environment in Guatemala

Description

Children's drawings are increasingly being used to assess understanding and diagnose misconceptions about water issues and the environment. As part of Arizona State University's Global Ethnohydrology Study and Community Health

Children's drawings are increasingly being used to assess understanding and diagnose misconceptions about water issues and the environment. As part of Arizona State University's Global Ethnohydrology Study and Community Health and Medical Anthropology Field School, 315 pieces of artwork from 158 Guatemalan schoolchildren, ages 9-10, were collected using ethnographic field methods. The children were asked to draw two pieces of art: one showing how they saw water being used in their neighborhood today and one showing how they imagined water would be used in their neighborhood 100 years from now. Using visual content analysis, the drawings were coded for the presence of vegetation, scarcity, pollution, commercial sources, existing technology, technological innovation, domestic use, and natural sources of water. The study finds that (1) students' drawings of the future contain significantly more pollution and scarcity than those in the present, and (2) both boys and girls depict existing technology significantly more often in the drawings of today than the drawings of the future. Additionally, (1) boys are significantly more likely than girls to draw more negative depictions of water (i.e., pollution and scarcity), and (2) boys are significantly more likely than girls to depict the natural world (i.e., natural sources of water). Through examining gendered perceptions and future expectations of climate change and water issues, this study explores possible areas of intervention in environmental education in a developing country.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Alzheimer's Stigma in Guatemala

Description

ABSTRACT
Overview: There has been very little research done into the topic of mental illness in general, and Alzheimer’s Disease specifically, in Guatemala. The existing research accounts for prevalence

ABSTRACT
Overview: There has been very little research done into the topic of mental illness in general, and Alzheimer’s Disease specifically, in Guatemala. The existing research accounts for prevalence of mental illness in Guatemala with an estimated prevalence of a mental illness of 27.8% (Guatemalan Government, 2009). Alzheimer’s Disease is less well researched.

Research Question: This research addresses this gap in knowledge by focusing on the stigma felt toward people who had Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementia (ADRD) by the people of Guatemala.

Participants: One-hundred twenty-four individuals over the age of 18 were recruited for participation. Participants were recruited through opportunity samples in artisan markets in Antigua.

Procedures: Participants completed a survey including demographic questions, the Dementia Attitudes Scale (O’Connor & McFadden 2010), as well as open-ended questions regarding the causes, symptoms, and treatments for Alzheimer’s. The study was conducted from July 2, 2018 to August 2, 2018.

Results: The average DAS score of 100.31± 14.01 found in this study is similar to results from other studies conducted in the United States (O'Connor & McFadden, 2010). Factor analysis did not verify the existence of sub-scales in the survey, as found in previous studies. The free-response questions indicated that many people may believe that ADRD is an inherited disease or one that is caused by factors outside of their control.

Conclusions: The high DAS score of 100.31± 14.01 matches other studies that used the DAS. Scores of 103.51± 13.43 (Scerri & Scerri, 2013) were reported in other studies and interpreted as positive as it relates to stigma. This points to a low stigma level in Guatemala. The failure to verify the sub-scales leads to the conclusion that although scales are validated in western nations, they may not be culturally portable. The DAS scale may not be measuring the same thing in this sample’s population versus previous studies sample populations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Economic Development and Reproduction: Understanding the Role of Market Opportunities in Shaping Fertility Variation

Description

Evolutionary and economic theories of fertility variation argue that novel subsistence opportunities associated with market economies shape reproduction in ways that both increase parental investment per child and lower overall

Evolutionary and economic theories of fertility variation argue that novel subsistence opportunities associated with market economies shape reproduction in ways that both increase parental investment per child and lower overall fertility. I use demographic and ethnographic data from Guatemala as a case study to illustrate how ethnic inequalities in accessing market opportunities have shaped demographic variation and the perceptions of parental investments. I then discuss two projects that use secondary data sets to address issues of conceptualizing and operationalizing market opportunities in national and cross-population comparative work. The first argues that social relationships are critical means of accessing market opportunities, and uses Guatemala household stocks of certain forms of relational wealth are associated with greater parental investments in education. The second focuses on a methodological issue in how common measures of wealth in comparative demographic studies conflate economic capacity with market opportunities, and how this conceptual confusion biases our interpretations of the observed links between wealth and fertility over the course of the demographic transition.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019