Matching Items (100)

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The Sustainability of Components of the Supply Chain of Local Business in the Greater Phoenix, Arizona Area that Lead to and Increase Success

Description

In order to graduate with honors from Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University, I have completed the following thesis under the direction of Dr. Craig Carter and Dr. John Eaton. The purpose of this thesis is to perform

In order to graduate with honors from Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University, I have completed the following thesis under the direction of Dr. Craig Carter and Dr. John Eaton. The purpose of this thesis is to perform preliminary and proprietary research on the sustainability of components of the supply chain of local business within the greater Phoenix, Arizona area in order to determine practices that can lead to and even increase success in a competitive niche of already competitive industries, especially during times of supply chain stress. My hypothesis is that preliminary and proprietary research will both display that the consumer aspect of the supply chain of local business is the most essential, especially if other aspects of the supply chain experience distress. My preliminary research involved breaking down the title of this thesis into four parts: sustainability, supply chain, local business, and the Phoenix local business market and then performing internet research and interviews in order to form a solid understanding of such concepts. Then, I performed my proprietary research, which involved conducting a consumer survey and three interviews with local business owners. Though my hypothesis is not supported, I have learned a lot on the topic of this thesis itself, as well as on the thesis writing process.

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2019-05

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HISPANIC BARRIERS IN THE HEALTH FIELD IN THE PHOENIX METROPOLITAN AREA

Description

This study identifies and examines healthcare barriers experienced by the Hispanic1 population in Phoenix, Arizona. A cross-sectional survey was used to explore these barriers for 123 members of the community, and the findings reveal that the main impediments to healthcare

This study identifies and examines healthcare barriers experienced by the Hispanic1 population in Phoenix, Arizona. A cross-sectional survey was used to explore these barriers for 123 members of the community, and the findings reveal that the main impediments to healthcare faced by the Hispanic population are structured by their language, immigration status, education level, and access to health insurance. The results of the survey were then analyzed to explore possible mechanisms of the origin or intensification of the barriers, as well as potential solutions such as educating future providers to be culturally competent, usage of integrated medical settings, and the advertisement and extension of Promotoras to the community.

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2019-05

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A Comparative Analysis of the Role of Farmers’ Markets in Local Food Systems

Description

The following paper is a comparison between the Mercato di Sant’Ambrogio (Sant’Ambrogio Market) in Florence, Italy and the Open Air Farmers’ Market in Phoenix, Arizona. Farmers’ markets, such as these, serve to rekindle a relationship with food that over time

The following paper is a comparison between the Mercato di Sant’Ambrogio (Sant’Ambrogio Market) in Florence, Italy and the Open Air Farmers’ Market in Phoenix, Arizona. Farmers’ markets, such as these, serve to rekindle a relationship with food that over time has been lost, particularly due to the green revolution, globalisation, and the mechanization of agriculture. In addition, farmers’ markets serve to foster relationships between community members and farmers, and they are an important element of a movement to create food sovereignty within local communities. Food sovereignty gives people the right to decide their food choices. In our modern system where many agricultural decisions are made by the government or large corporations, reclaiming food sovereignty is a larger effort to take back control of personal rights, individual health and the health of the environment.
Using Sant’Ambrogio and Open Air as case studies for the research, this paper provides insight on the degree of impact that local farmers’ markets can have on creating food sovereignty within communities; and how pre-existing factors and negative forces diminish the benefits of farmers’ markets and local food movements. Among many, some of these negative forces include the effects of social and cultural pressures that promote fast food and convenience; a broken agricultural system controlled by monopoly companies; industrial food items priced cheaper than small farmers can compete with; and an underscore of unethical behavior across all sectors (including organic and local) that inhibit honest farmers from making enough profit to survive.
The comparison between Sant’Ambrogio and Open Air Market indicates that big agriculture undermines the success of local farming movements in both countries, but Phoenix can still learn from the movement in Florence, which is rooted in a deep history of outdoor markets and rich food culture. Italy is fortunate in terms of their agriculture capacity because their climate allows for a diverse variety of crops; while Arizona does not have the same agricultural capacity as the Mediterranean climate of Italy, it is still valuable to mimic the network of local food systems that Italy has. In order to do so, Phoenician consumers should take advantage of the food that grows locally and then supplement it with more diverse crops from other areas of Arizona or the southwest.
The Open Air Market in Phoenix currently does not play an important role in the food system except for helping people to relate community and socialization to food. Transparency, communication and education are required to actually increase the success of small local farmers and to help the Open Air Market play a real role in the local food movement and the establishment of food sovereignty.

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2019-05

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Investigating the Relationship between Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status and Proximity to Public Services

Description

With growing levels of income inequality in the United States, it remains as important as ever to ensure indispensable public services are readily available to all members of society. This paper investigates four forms of public services (schools, libraries, fire

With growing levels of income inequality in the United States, it remains as important as ever to ensure indispensable public services are readily available to all members of society. This paper investigates four forms of public services (schools, libraries, fire stations, and police stations), first by researching the background of these services and their relation to poverty, and then by conducting geospatial and regression analysis. The author uses Esri's ArcGIS Pro software to quantify the proximity to public services from urban American neighborhoods (census tracts in the cities of Phoenix and Chicago). Afterwards, the measures indicating proximity are compared to the socioeconomic statuses of neighborhoods using regression analysis. The results indicate that pure proximity to these four services is not necessarily correlated to socioeconomic status. While the paper does uncover some correlations, such as a relationship between school quality and socioeconomic status, the majority of the findings negate the author's hypothesis and show that, in Phoenix and Chicago, there is not much discrepancy between neighborhoods and the extent to which they are able to access vital government-funded services.

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2018-05

Walking and Transit and Heat, Oh My!: An Exposure Study of Phoenix Pedestrians

Description

Many people use public transportation in their daily lives, which is often praised at as a healthy and sustainable choice to make. However, in extreme temperatures this also puts people at a greater risk for negative consequences resulting from such

Many people use public transportation in their daily lives, which is often praised at as a healthy and sustainable choice to make. However, in extreme temperatures this also puts people at a greater risk for negative consequences resulting from such exposure to heat. In Phoenix, public transportation riders are faced with extreme heat in the summer along with the increased internal heat production caused by the physical activity required to use public transportation. In this study, I estimated total exposure and average exposure per rider for six stops in Phoenix. To do this I used City of Phoenix ridership data, weather data, and survey responses from an ASU City of Phoenix Bus Stop Survey conducted in summer 2016. These data sets were combined by multiplying different metrics to produce various exposure values. During analysis two sets of calculations were made. One keeping weather constant and another keeping ridership constant. I found that there was a large range of exposure between the selected stops and that the thermal environment influences the amount of exposure depending on the time of day the exposure is occurring. During the morning a greener location leads to less exposure, while in the afternoon an urban location leads to less exposure. Know detailed information about exposure at these stops I was also able to evaluate survey participants' thermal comfort at each stop and how it may relate to exposure. These findings are useful in making educated transportation planning decisions and improving the quality of life for people living in places with extreme summer temperatures.

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2018-05

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Welcome to Phoenix: A Coloring Guidebook for Refugee Families

Description

For my thesis, I made a coloring book that acts as a guide for refugee children and their parents of the city of Phoenix as well as new life in the United States. The book works to tackle the difficulty

For my thesis, I made a coloring book that acts as a guide for refugee children and their parents of the city of Phoenix as well as new life in the United States. The book works to tackle the difficulty of transitioning into a new country as well as encourage a dialog between refugee children and their parents surrounding learning and education. I formatted the book into two sections. The front half of the book is targeted towards the children. It is full of coloring pages depicting daily life in Phoenix as well as many fun things that our city has to offer. There are also activity pages scattered in that prompt the children to complete them with their parents and read together. This is aimed to help children succeed in a new learning environment and school system as well as bring the latter half of the book into the parents’ attention. The second half of the book is tailored for the parents as it is a full directory of resources for both refugees and Phoenix residents alike. It includes resources such as free language and literacy classes, employment services, refugee clinics, international food markets, public safety, public transportation, and more. While there are so many different wonderful organizations out there for refugees, it can be overwhelming to navigate our complicated systems rendering these resources difficult to find. With this book, I have compiled these resources into a format that is fun, easily read and translated, and accessible to refugees of all ages.

Link to E-book: https://read.bookcreator.com/B34KYvw00jNsXE7pfoC6lGDtTDC3/p_qX4KXxSte2O…

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Date Created
2020-05

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Programs to Address Veteran Homelessness in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

Description

There is a need within the Phoenix Metropolitan area to solve the complex issue of
veteran homelessness. According to the Veterans Affairs, over 500,000 veterans live
in Arizona, which comprises about 2.5% of the nation’s veteran’s population as of
September

There is a need within the Phoenix Metropolitan area to solve the complex issue of
veteran homelessness. According to the Veterans Affairs, over 500,000 veterans live
in Arizona, which comprises about 2.5% of the nation’s veteran’s population as of
September 30, 2017. Many veterans have neither the skills nor resources necessary
to integrate back into society after their tour of duty thus leading them into
homelessness.

The goal of this thesis is to research organizations in the Phoenix Metropolitan area
that help to prevent veteran homelessness and/or assist homeless veterans in
obtaining stable housing. Programs and services provided by various organizations
are discussed, along with an analysis which reveals insufficient money, labor, and
space to fully address veteran homelessness, as well as a trend where most
organizations are trying to solve this issue on their own. Recommendations are
provided which include identifying synergies between entities to create greater impact
through partnerships, so society can improve the veteran homelessness situation and
help those who bravely served our country find stability in their personal lives.

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Date Created
2020-05

De aquí, de allá, de las dos: Three Women's Language Learning Journeys from Mexico to Arizona

Description

The purpose of this study is to document and analyze three women's English language learning journeys after moving from various parts of Mexico to Phoenix, Arizona. The study explores the effects of English as a Second Language (ESL) education on

The purpose of this study is to document and analyze three women's English language learning journeys after moving from various parts of Mexico to Phoenix, Arizona. The study explores the effects of English as a Second Language (ESL) education on the social and cultural development of Mexican women students at Friendly House, whose mission is to "Empower Arizona communities through education and human services". The literature review section explores such topics as the complications and history of Mexican immigration to Phoenix and of state-funded ESL education in Phoenix. The consequent research study will entail a pair of interviews with the three beginner ESL students about their lives in Mexico compared to their lives in Phoenix, with a specific focus on aspects of their language acquisition and cultural adjustment to life in Arizona. Photos of and by the consultants add to their stories and lead to a discussion about the implications of their experiences for ESL teachers. By documenting the consultants' experiences, this study finds many gaps in ESL education in Phoenix. Suggestions about how ESL programs and teaching methods can be modified to fit student's needs form the basis for the conclusions.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Ending Homelessness in Phoenix: How Investments in Housing First Could End Homelessness in the Valley

Description

Homelessness is one of the most visible and tragic problems facing Phoenix today. As Tucson cut its homelessness count nearly in half over the past six years, Phoenix only saw a reduction of 25%. The question remains: what is the

Homelessness is one of the most visible and tragic problems facing Phoenix today. As Tucson cut its homelessness count nearly in half over the past six years, Phoenix only saw a reduction of 25%. The question remains: what is the best solution for Phoenix to reduce and eventually eliminate homelessness? This paper examined costs and benefits as well as examples in other cities and states of Housing First solutions' effectiveness at reducing the number of people suffering from homelessness. It was found that Housing First solutions, namely Permanent Supportive Housing and Rapid Re-Housing, would be highly effective in combating the homelessness experienced by those in the Phoenix area.

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Date Created
2017-05

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Understanding the Push for Development in Water Stressed Phoenix, Arizona

Description

Located in the Sunbelt of the Southwestern United States, Phoenix Arizona finds itself in one of the hottest, driest places in the world. Thankfully, Phoenix has the Salt River, Gila River, Verde River, and a vast aquifer to meet the

Located in the Sunbelt of the Southwestern United States, Phoenix Arizona finds itself in one of the hottest, driest places in the world. Thankfully, Phoenix has the Salt River, Gila River, Verde River, and a vast aquifer to meet the water demands of the municipal, industrial, and agricultural sectors. However, rampant groundwater pumping and over-allocation of these water supplies based on unprecedented, high flows of the Colorado River have created challenges for water managers to ensure adequate water supply for the future. Combined with the current 17-year drought and the warming and drying projections of climate change, the future of water availability in Phoenix will depend on the strength of water management laws, educating the public, developing a strong sense of community, and using development to manage population and support sustainability. As the prevalence of agriculture declines in and around Phoenix, a substantial amount of water is saved. Instead of storing this saved water, Phoenix is using it to support further development. Despite uncertainty regarding the abundant and continuous availability of Phoenix's water resources, development has hardly slowed and barely shifted directions to support sustainability. Phoenix was made to grow until it legally cannot expand anymore. In order to develop solutions, we must first understand the push for development in water-stressed Phoenix, Arizona.

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Date Created
2017-05