Matching Items (12)

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Brielle: Behind the Headlines A Cross-Cultural Docuseries Creation

Description

As a student at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Barrett, The Honors College, as well as a lover of travel, Brielle Ashford decided to combine her

As a student at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Barrett, The Honors College, as well as a lover of travel, Brielle Ashford decided to combine her passions and spent four months abroad in Spring, 2019, creating a senior thesis in digital international journalism. She enrolled in the Center for Intercultural Educational Exchange's Open Campus program for a semester and spent a month and a half each in three countries. Starting in Cape Town, South Africa, she interviewed locals about their lives post-Apartheid. In Paris, France, Brielle found a story in a non-profit that teaches French youth about religious diversity. Lastly in Rome, Italy, she covered the famous, vibrant food culture of gelato at the city’s oldest gelateria. It was the experience of a lifetime and the stories stand on their own... and she made it all happen with little more than the Adobe editing suite and an iPhone X.

CAPE TOWN IN BLACK, WHITE AND COLOURED:
https://youtu.be/7egRATDxKso

RELIGIOUS SECULARITY IN PARIS: FILLING IN THE GAPS THE LAW LEFT OUT
https://youtu.be/Xd6PsFIgj0M

A TASTE OF ROME AT PALAZZO DEL FREDDO:
https://youtu.be/iW60mxD_xTo

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Modernizing Paris: The Second Empire Urban Renovations from 1853-1870

Description

This thesis explores the wide-ranging urban renovations of Paris that the Second Empire, led by Emperor Napoleon III, commissioned from 1853-1870. The complex nature of redesigning the French capital required

This thesis explores the wide-ranging urban renovations of Paris that the Second Empire, led by Emperor Napoleon III, commissioned from 1853-1870. The complex nature of redesigning the French capital required the oversight of the prefect of the Seine under Napoleon III, Georges-Eugène Haussmann, a man who popularized not only the appearance of Paris as it is known today but also the innovative means of financing projects of such large magnitudes. Ordering for wider streets to accommodate the flow of traffic from a rapidly growing population in the nineteenth century, the city government of Paris saw an opportunity to modernize completely its urban area in a functional manner by implementing new water and sewer systems, municipal parks, street lighting, and uniform façades. The comprehensive nature of this undertaking constituted one of the first instances of modern urban planning. While the massive construction projects did displace many of the residents of the city's core, they fundamentally transformed Paris from a medieval town notorious for its malodorous stench, overcrowding, and disease to one of the world's most celebrated and visited cities.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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French Jewish Emigration, the United States, and the Second World War

Description

At odds with the Axis powers in the Second World War, the American government
began the task of dealing with an influx of Europeans seeking refugee status stateside, even before

At odds with the Axis powers in the Second World War, the American government
began the task of dealing with an influx of Europeans seeking refugee status stateside, even before the Japanese attack Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. American interest in the global situation, nevertheless, did not officially begin after the initial attack on the 7th of December. Before that date, the United States government had to address refugees seeking asylum from European countries. Often studied, German emigration to the United States at times took center stage in terms of the refugee situation after the Nazi regime enacted anti- Semitic legislation in Germany and its occupied nations, prior to the American declaration of war. France, however, had a crisis of its own after the Germans invaded in the summer of 1940, and the fall of France led to a large portion of France occupied by Germany and the formation of a new government in the non-occupied zone, the Vichy regime.
France had an extensive history of Jewish culture and citizenship culture prior to 1940, and xenophobia, especially common after the 1941 National Revolution in France, led to a “France for the French” mentality championed by Marshal Philippe Pétain, Chief of State of Vichy France. The need for the French Jewish population to seek emigration became a reality in the face of the collaborationist Vichy government and anti-Semitic statutes enacted in 1940 and 1941. French anti-Semitic policies and practices led many Jews to seek asylum in the United States, though American policy was divided between a small segment of government officials, politicians, individuals, and Jewish relief groups who wanted to aid European Jews, and a more powerful nativist faction, led by Breckenridge Long which did not support immigration. President Roosevelt, and the American government, fully aware of the situation of French Jews, did little concrete to aid their asylum in the United States.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Louis XIV: Decision Making and Foreign Policy

Description

A study of the personal rule of the seventeenth century French king, Louis XIV analyzing his decision making process as an absolutist ruler. A special focus on Louis' foreign policy

A study of the personal rule of the seventeenth century French king, Louis XIV analyzing his decision making process as an absolutist ruler. A special focus on Louis' foreign policy influences and how he conducted his government including the roles of ministers, ambassadors, the French court and nobility, and councils in the way he made decisions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Urban Culture in Lyon, France Today: Exploring its Creators and Consumers

Description

This work aims to give the general public a unique insight into French urban culture through my experience while living and filming a personal documentary in Lyon, France. The goal

This work aims to give the general public a unique insight into French urban culture through my experience while living and filming a personal documentary in Lyon, France. The goal of the project is to examine and consequently describe what this culture consists of while comparing and contrasting it to our own urban culture. The work depicts the creators and performers of the culture as well as its audience, which differs from our own here in the U.S in part thanks to France's efficient public transportation system, used by people from every social class. Immersing myself in this fascinating world truly helped me get through to the heart of the French people and artists that make up the urban culture in Lyon. Observing performances and daily practices while digging deep into each artist's story allowed me to unravel the identity of this culture one person at a time.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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A Tribute to the Women Among us

Description

I have conducted a creative that captures the power of women through an artistic perspective. The title of the creative project is “A Tribute to the Women Among us,” because

I have conducted a creative that captures the power of women through an artistic perspective. The title of the creative project is “A Tribute to the Women Among us,” because this project’s purpose is to express gratitude for the women that fought for the rights I have today, and for the women I encounter in marches, continuing the fight. I have taken photographs of women and children at women's marches in the United States and in France, yielding a total of 10 photographs I will be presenting at my defense, and printing out to sell. All the profits made from the photographs will be donated to planned parenthood.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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How Three Communities Support Human Trafficking Survivors

Description

Human trafficking is the focus of this study and explaining the ways different communities in the world handle their specific concerns of human trafficking, with a focus on a nonprofit

Human trafficking is the focus of this study and explaining the ways different communities in the world handle their specific concerns of human trafficking, with a focus on a nonprofit in each community. Human trafficking is a global issue and different communities address it in different ways. Human trafficking is the focus of this study and explaining the ways different communities in the world handle their specific concerns of human trafficking, with a focus on a nonprofit in each community. This thesis will focus on how three communities- Ghana, France and Spain, in the world are working with human trafficking victims. Field research at each site was conducted including meetings with service providers to explore the issue of human trafficking in the region including the laws, victimization patterns, and how the community was responding to the problem. A set of questions was asked at each site and this thesis is the summation of the findings from the field research. This study was approved by the Arizona State University Institution Review Board, (see Appendix A). The overall findings of this study found that each community need is very different, so each community response has been tailored to the victims of trafficking and what they require and must include the victim in the solution. Each location has different victims, locations and responses.
Keywords: sex trafficking, France, Ghana, human trafficking, NGO, research, Spain

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Silent combat: gendered applications of female imagery in France, 1789-1944

Description

This thesis addresses the concept of "silence" in Vercors' 1943 novel on resistance in occupied France, The Silence of the Sea, contesting the arguments of scholars who designate silent resistance

This thesis addresses the concept of "silence" in Vercors' 1943 novel on resistance in occupied France, The Silence of the Sea, contesting the arguments of scholars who designate silent resistance as expressly "female" and applicable only to women. Although women in France were supposed to be apolitical and removed from activities such as public debates and direct warfare, an examination of allegorical and historical female figures, together with male and female interpretations of those figures, suggests that men and women in France understood patriotism, and especially female patriotism, through a conceptual framework that was informed by and manifested itself in female images of the French Republic. My study on the gendered applications of female images focuses upon the French use of female allegorical figures, and resistance symbols such as the Lorraine Cross, to denote opposition to the Prussian/German acquisition of lands that the French people perceived as French, exploring commonalities between images from the Franco-Prussian War and World War II. Utilizing images relating to the republican values of liberty, equality, and fraternity, including Marianne, the female allegory of the people's Republic, and Joan of Arc, a historical character who became a female allegorical figure, this thesis argues that female allegories of republican resistance to tyranny were combined with resistance to Prussia (Germany) during the "Terrible Year" of 1870-1871. Furthermore, these images combined masculine militant elements, with perceived feminine qualities such as purity and saintly endurance, giving rise to divergent interpretations of female imagery among men and women, and a perceived association between women and silent, indirect resistance. Bourgeois men applied the militant aspects of female images to real women in abstract form. However, with the German annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, resistance techniques and symbols that had been gendered feminine gained precedence and became associated with men as well as women. Recent scholars have utilized the masculine/feminine dichotomy in French female allegories to classify World War II-era resistance as either "active" or "passive," failing to consider the conflation of the masculine/temporal and feminine/spiritual spheres in Vercors' novel and in documents such as "Advice to the Occupied."

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Unveiled: France's inability to accept Islam

Description

The thesis I have written aims to investigate the underlying reasons why France has considered Islam as unassimilable and why it has targeted Muslim women’s bodies to force assimilation. In

The thesis I have written aims to investigate the underlying reasons why France has considered Islam as unassimilable and why it has targeted Muslim women’s bodies to force assimilation. In the first section of the thesis, I examine the colonial relationship between France and Algeria. I conclude that Algeria’s independence from France significantly influenced the negative treatment towards immigrants in postcolonial France. I then study the racist discourse that dominated French politics in the 1980s; and clarify how this has laid the foundation for the first attempt to ban the headscarves in public schools during the 1980s. The final section explores the 2004 ban on conspicuous religious symbols, a ban that significantly targeted the headscarf. I conclude that the prohibition of the headscarf undermined the rights of Muslim women and symbolized France’s inability to accept Islam, since France feared Islam’s visibility weakened a dominant French identity.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Resilience, Rescue, and Resistance: The History of the Loewy Family in Europe and United States

Description

Through the lens of a Jewish family in the early 20th century, histories of resilience, rescue, and resistance are shown. The Loewys were a Jewish family who migrated from Poland

Through the lens of a Jewish family in the early 20th century, histories of resilience, rescue, and resistance are shown. The Loewys were a Jewish family who migrated from Poland to Germany then France and ending up in the United States following World War II. In their travels they experienced many of which other Jewish experiences were, while also differentiating from the overall story. The family also experienced life as refugees and interns during the Holocaust. Arrested in Vichy following the Armistice between Germany and France, the Loewys were later granted their freedom which they used to help free others from the camp. One of the few stories of Jews rescuing Jews, the family began its life as resistors to the Vichy and German occupation. Participating in both passive and active resistance from 1940-1944, they witnessed the highs and lows of this new life. The end of the war saw the family make it to the United States beginning their next chapter as survivors of the Holocaust and the war. With the use of primary source material provided by the Loewys, along with scholarly work about the different periods, the story of the Loewys is one of resilience in the face of mounting adversity, rescuing of internes from camps, and resistance against an occupational force that furthers the research of the Jewish experience in the early 20th century.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020