Matching Items (38)

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International Partnerships:Sustainable Development Goal 17 and the Role of Nonprofits: A Case Study on the International Alliance for the Prevention of AIDS

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A nonprofit organization’s ability to help its target population depends strongly on the collaboration of the organization’s staff and leadership. An organization that spans across international borders must overcome adversity, particularly communication and power inequity. The International Alliance for the

A nonprofit organization’s ability to help its target population depends strongly on the collaboration of the organization’s staff and leadership. An organization that spans across international borders must overcome adversity, particularly communication and power inequity. The International Alliance for the Prevention of AIDS (IAPA) is a nonprofit with staff in the U.S. and India, making it an international partnership. This research evaluates to what extent the Indian partners believe IAPA meets Sustainable Development Goal 17: “to revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development.” I developed three semi-structured interview protocols for volunteers, employees, and IAPA beneficiaries. After interviews were conducted and transcribed, 5 major themes were identified from coding keywords. First, I grouped definitions of "success" in a partnership to create a baseline of expectations. Second, I assessed the extent of participants' knowledge about the U.S. role in IAPA. Third, I identified areas of strength. Fourth, I identified areas of improvement and grievances. Fifth, I assessed the Indian partners' views on mutualism within IAPA. Results indicated that participants believed communication, cooperation, and respect were traits of a successful partnership. The participants believe IAPA mostly exhibit these values, but that the U.S. role as a decision maker can hinder these. They desire more transparency but overall believe IAPA is beneficial and mutualistic. These findings can be furthered by assessing U.S. staff and board member perceptions of the partnership. By continuously investigating the state of international partnerships, we can learn more about how to create sustainable models for the future.

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2019-05

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The Emerging Art Worlds of the South Asian Diaspora

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In the late 2000s and 2010s, digital art and the use of the internet as a new platform for art to be displayed became increasingly common. A new art scene began developing among South Asian diasporic artists, driven primarily by

In the late 2000s and 2010s, digital art and the use of the internet as a new platform for art to be displayed became increasingly common. A new art scene began developing among South Asian diasporic artists, driven primarily by adolescents and young adult women who have never attended art school. Their primary medium is digital tools, their primary display platform is the internet, and they adhere to a DIY ("do-it-yourself") ethic rather than traditional art techniques and norms. As these internet artists have forgone the traditional gallery art scene in favor of more accessible internet platforms, these artists have not received attention from the mainstream art world. However, the popularity of these internet artists is undeniable as many of them have tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands of followers on their social media accounts. This new art scene has gained notice with the advent of social media platforms such as Tumblr and Instagram and websites focused on youth culture and counterculture, such as Vice, Buzzfeed, Dazed, and independent digital zine publications. The content of the work of these artists is often political, promoting feminist ideals, challenging South Asian and European beauty standards and limiting stereotypes of South Asian women, and creating groundbreaking new representations of South Asian women. Influences from both South Asian and Western pop culture and counterculture are prominent in their as well. This thesis explores the origins of this art scene and its roots in South Asian modernism and conventional South Asian diasporic artists.

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2018-05

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Mental Health in India

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In this creative thesis, I traveled to India and used my month long summer vacation back home to interview people about mental health in India. I talked to a therapist and four students about depression to find out what the

In this creative thesis, I traveled to India and used my month long summer vacation back home to interview people about mental health in India. I talked to a therapist and four students about depression to find out what the situation is in India, contributing factors, experiences and stigma unique to depression among students in India, what the government is doing, and possible solutions or steps that can be taken to help students struggling with mental health problems. I also went to mainstream and special schools to meet special educators who work with differently abled children, occupational therapists, parents of differently abled children, and a student with Asperger’s in Chennai, Tamil Nadu to find out about the stigma surrounding differently abled children and their education path.
My efforts have culminated in the creation of the website mentalhealthinindia.com that can be used as a resource both by people in India as well as those abroad who are curious to learn about the stigma surrounding depression and differently abled children in India.

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2019-05

The Experience of International Service Learning: Project Vietnam

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International Service Devils (ISD) is a non-profit volunteer program established and run by students at Arizona State University, Polytechnic Campus. Since 2013, International Service Devils has volunteered in Costa Rica, Guatemala, and India. This blog, written by Kali Richmond and

International Service Devils (ISD) is a non-profit volunteer program established and run by students at Arizona State University, Polytechnic Campus. Since 2013, International Service Devils has volunteered in Costa Rica, Guatemala, and India. This blog, written by Kali Richmond and myself, shares the experience of how we as students are establishing a new volunteer program in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. We have described in an entertaining fashion, our entire learning process from the brainstorming and organizing to the results of the trip itself. This includes the struggles that we had to overcome with planning and finances, as well as crediting the people and organizations who helped us along the way to overcome those obstacles. We established 2 volunteer projects as well as completed multiple community analyses for the possibility of starting a school and providing scholarships to deserving children through the Young Dreamer Network. This blog is accompanied by an approximately 15 minute video of footage and photos taken during our time in Vietnam. The video shows both the volunteer aspect as well as some of the cultural experiences that we experienced. The purpose of this documentation is to encourage international service learning as a source of experience and education for University students, and to show plausibility of setting goals similar to ours and being able to achieve them. We hope that our writing can help students get an idea of what it takes to be a leader in international service learning programs, and that our experience can help prove the worth of volunteering abroad. We want to inspire fellow students to travel with the mission to learn from wherever they go and be able to give back to those communities, as this has provided us with immense personal growth and new perspectives on education and culture.

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2017-05

Asha Kirana: Working With Angels

Description

Asha Kirana: Working with Angels is a documentary about the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southern India and how one hospital has taken the lead in giving their patients, especially children, a better quality of life. The documentary film uses the story

Asha Kirana: Working with Angels is a documentary about the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southern India and how one hospital has taken the lead in giving their patients, especially children, a better quality of life. The documentary film uses the story of one hospital and the doctors working there to illustrate a larger problem with the treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS in India. The goal of this film is to start a conversation about how India can help to destigmatize HIV/AIDS. The film uses a positive message of education, hope and passion to show how doctors and patients in India have already begun to reverse the stigma surrounding HIV in their community and how they hope to expand their efforts in the future. This project includes a written methodology explaining the goals for the film which include: showing how infected women and children in India are perceived, how important counseling is for a person with a terminal illness and how important education is in de-stigmatization of HIV/AIDS. The methodology also explains the current situation of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in India, the inspiration behind the film and the ways in which this film can create social change in India. The entire process of creating this documentary is also explained in a first-person narrative from the filmmaker. This gives insight into the filming process, immersion into another culture, how sources were cultivated, how interviews were conducted, restrictions and obstacles during the filming process, how those issues were overcome and the filmmaker's personal reflections.

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2016-05

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A Look into the Operations of Two Nonprofit Organizations on Opposite Sides of the World

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This thesis will analyze the operations of two nonprofit organizations located in different parts of the world. One local and one international nonprofit organization was chosen for this thesis/creative project because of the diverse culture, customs and regulations in each

This thesis will analyze the operations of two nonprofit organizations located in different parts of the world. One local and one international nonprofit organization was chosen for this thesis/creative project because of the diverse culture, customs and regulations in each setting. The paper will discuss the operations of St. Vincent de Paul, the Chandler Conference of St. Vincent de Paul, and Sri Sai Darshan Trust (SSDT). The paper begins with a brief history of nonprofit organizations followed by a detailed background on both organizations. The management (organizational structure), finances, marketing, and legalities will be discussed of each nonprofit. The paper will then examine the specialized projects of each organization throughout the year. A PEST, SWOT, value chain, Kraljic, spend, and demand analysis were conducted based off of the research on each nonprofit. The paper will then discuss the problems each organization exhibits and the potential solutions the nonprofits can implement into their daily operations in order to resolve them. This section analyzes the similarities and differences within each business area of the nonprofit organization. Short-term solutions to current business problems and long-term solutions to organizational problems will be discussed in this section. The conclusion is the final element of the thesis. In this section, a balanced scorecard will be created for each nonprofit organization. In addition, the authors will discuss what they learned throughout the entire process. The goal of this thesis/creative project was to integrate the knowledge and concepts from business (marketing, finance, management, accounting, supply chain management, and computer information systems), and find an application for each within nonprofit organizations around the world.

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2016-05

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Factors influencing uptake of the Take Home Ration in Southern Rajasthan, India

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Due to persistent undernutrition in India and the increased demands placed on a woman’s body during childbearing and lactation, the Indian government has implemented a program to provide supplemental nutrition packets to women in rural India. This study examines the

Due to persistent undernutrition in India and the increased demands placed on a woman’s body during childbearing and lactation, the Indian government has implemented a program to provide supplemental nutrition packets to women in rural India. This study examines the factors influencing uptake of nutritional packets by lactating mothers in southern, rural Rajasthan. Women were recruited from 65 villages in Rajasthan, India (n=149, minimum of 2 per village) to evaluate the relationship of nutrition packet uptake and two factors--education levels and distance to the health center.
Level of education had little impact on whether or not women received the nutrition packet. Of those women with no education, 63.1% received the packet. Of those with any education, 63.9% got the packet.
In contrast, distance was strongly correlated with whether or not women received the packet. For example, of the women living within 200 meters of the health center, 93.2% received a nutrition packet. Of the women living between 250 meters and one kilometer of the health center, 68.4% received a nutrition packet. Of the women living over one kilometer from the health center, only 25% received a nutrition packet. The relationship between uptake of packets and women’s perception of distance to the health center was also explored. Out of 50 women who did not receive the packet, all of the women who said there was no health center in their village did live more than one kilometer from a health center. Of the women who lived between 250 meters and one kilometer from the health center, 40% felt it was too far. Of the women who lived more than a kilometer from the health center, 66.7% felt it was too far and 29.6% said there was no health center in their village. Again, it does not appear that ‘too far’ is just a default reason for women, but that actual distance, more so than education, is a major contributing factor in their ability to take the nutrition packet. These findings suggest that improving access to supplemental nutrition packets at the village level may increase uptake by the women.

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2015-05

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Disability in India: Religious and Social Perspectives

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Experiential evidence leads specific individuals and groups within India to believe that individuals with disabilities are marginalized due to a Hindu value system that stigmatizes disability and relegates individuals with disabilities to below average social positions. I experienced this perspective

Experiential evidence leads specific individuals and groups within India to believe that individuals with disabilities are marginalized due to a Hindu value system that stigmatizes disability and relegates individuals with disabilities to below average social positions. I experienced this perspective firsthand by spending two months volunteering at an orphanage in India that cares for individuals (primarily children) with disabilities and significant health issues. The orphanage identifies with a Christian tradition, framing their perspective in a worldview that declares that all human beings have equal value regardless of their physical health situations. The orphanage perspective declares that there is a Hindu religious paradigm that stigmatizes individuals with disability in a manner so extreme that it leads parents to abandon their children with disabilities. From the orphanage perspective, this Hindu religious belief is what inevitably leads to the need for orphanages for children with special needs because the stigma that the orphanage perceives leads to abandonment. This premise led me to an investigation of perceived cultural and societal norms and Hindu beliefs within India that may lead to the marginalization of individuals with disabilities. In order to do this, I first had to contextualize the perspective of the orphanage. From there I looked to Indian disability policy and sought to connect stigma and disability in the secular and social realm, evaluating whether or not secular policies can be said to contribute to or detract from a stigma of disability. I then looked to Hindu beliefs, to determine whether or not Hinduism can truly be said to, in a generalized manner, marginalize individuals with disability, and furthermore the caste system, to evaluate what India's social hierarchy might have to say about disability. The goals of this thesis are to evaluate the popular Hindu beliefs that are often blamed for the stigmatization of disability, and to analyze policies regarding disability and examine how these policies are affected by the religious context in which they are situated. To what extent does Hinduism encourage or contribute to a society or culture in which individuals with disabilities are treated badly, and how do Indian policies regarding disability respond to that? I come to the conclusion that the stigma related to disability in India is far more complex than simply a Hindu belief that mandates it as so. There are social and economic factors that play into it, as well as deep-rooted cultural ideologies in both the tradition of the orphanage that perceives Hinduism as stigmatizing of disability, and Indian religion and social hierarchy. I furthermore find that, though there are numerous disability policies in place to provide human rights to individuals with disabilities, these policies ultimately do not work to tear down the stigma and the roots it does have in ancient religious tradition and social hierarchy.

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2015-05

The Experience of International Service Learning: Project Vietnam

Description

Abstract: International Service Devils (ISD) is a non-profit volunteer program established and run by students at Arizona State University, Polytechnic Campus. Since 2013, International Service Devils has volunteered in Costa Rica, Guatemala, and India. This blog, written by Kali Richmond

Abstract: International Service Devils (ISD) is a non-profit volunteer program established and run by students at Arizona State University, Polytechnic Campus. Since 2013, International Service Devils has volunteered in Costa Rica, Guatemala, and India. This blog, written by Kali Richmond and myself, shares the experience of how we as students have established a new volunteer program in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. We have described in an entertaining fashion, our entire learning process from the brainstorming and organizing, to the results of the trip itself. This includes the struggles that we had to overcome with planning and finances, as well as crediting the people and organizations who helped us along the way to overcome those obstacles. We established 2 volunteer projects as well as completed multiple community analyses for the possibility of starting a school and providing scholarships to deserving children through the Young Dreamer Network. This blog is accompanied by an approximately 15 minute video of footage and photos taken during our time in Vietnam. The video shows both the volunteer aspect as well as some of the cultural experiences that we experienced. The purpose of this documentation is to encourage international service learning as a source of experience and education for University students, and to show plausibility of setting goals similar to ours and being able to achieve them. We hope that our writing can help students get an idea of what it takes to be a leader in international service learning programs, and that our experience can help prove the worth of volunteering abroad. We want to inspire fellow students to travel with the mission to learn from wherever they go and be able to give back to those communities, as this has provided us with immense personal growth and new perspectives on education and culture.

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2017-05

Bhairavi: A Performance-Investigation of Belonging and Dis-Belonging in Diaspora Communities

Description

Bhairavi is a solo performance that investigates belonging and dis-belonging in diaspora communities, especially as it relates to the female body. Specifically, through my experience as a second-generation Indian-American woman - I expose and challenge the notion of ‘tradition,’ as

Bhairavi is a solo performance that investigates belonging and dis-belonging in diaspora communities, especially as it relates to the female body. Specifically, through my experience as a second-generation Indian-American woman - I expose and challenge the notion of ‘tradition,’ as it is forced into women’s bodies, and displaces them in their own homes. Bhairavi is a story told through movement and theatrical narrative composition with research and material collected through structured and unstructured observation of my family, cultural community, and myself.

Note: This work of creative scholarship is rooted in collaboration between three female artist-scholars: Carly Bates, Raji Ganesan, and Allyson Yoder. Working from a common intersectional, feminist framework, we served as artistic co-directors of each other’s solo pieces and co-producers of Negotiations, in which we share these pieces in relationship to each other. Thus, Negotiations is not a showcase of three individual works, but rather a conversation among three voices. As collaborators, we have been uncompromising in the pursuit of our own unique inquiries and voices, and each of our works of creative scholarship stand alone. However, we believe that all of the parts are best understood in relationship to each other, and to the whole. For this reason, we have chosen to cross-reference our thesis documents.

French Vanilla: An Exploration of Biracial Identity Through Narrative Performance by Carly Bates

Deep roots, shared fruits: Emergent creative process and the ecology of solo performance through “Dress in Something Plain and Dark” by Allyson Yoder

Bhairavi: A Performance-Investigation of Belonging and Dis-Belonging in Diaspora
Communities by Raji Ganesan

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2016-05