Matching Items (32)

Asha Kirana: Working With Angels

Description

Asha Kirana: Working with Angels is a documentary about the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southern India and how one hospital has taken the lead in giving their patients, especially children, a

Asha Kirana: Working with Angels is a documentary about the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southern India and how one hospital has taken the lead in giving their patients, especially children, a better quality of life. The documentary film uses the story of one hospital and the doctors working there to illustrate a larger problem with the treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS in India. The goal of this film is to start a conversation about how India can help to destigmatize HIV/AIDS. The film uses a positive message of education, hope and passion to show how doctors and patients in India have already begun to reverse the stigma surrounding HIV in their community and how they hope to expand their efforts in the future. This project includes a written methodology explaining the goals for the film which include: showing how infected women and children in India are perceived, how important counseling is for a person with a terminal illness and how important education is in de-stigmatization of HIV/AIDS. The methodology also explains the current situation of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in India, the inspiration behind the film and the ways in which this film can create social change in India. The entire process of creating this documentary is also explained in a first-person narrative from the filmmaker. This gives insight into the filming process, immersion into another culture, how sources were cultivated, how interviews were conducted, restrictions and obstacles during the filming process, how those issues were overcome and the filmmaker's personal reflections.

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  • 2016-05

The Experience of International Service Learning: Project Vietnam

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International Service Devils (ISD) is a non-profit volunteer program established and run by students at Arizona State University, Polytechnic Campus. Since 2013, International Service Devils has volunteered in Costa Rica,

International Service Devils (ISD) is a non-profit volunteer program established and run by students at Arizona State University, Polytechnic Campus. Since 2013, International Service Devils has volunteered in Costa Rica, Guatemala, and India. This blog, written by Kali Richmond and myself, shares the experience of how we as students are establishing a new volunteer program in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. We have described in an entertaining fashion, our entire learning process from the brainstorming and organizing to the results of the trip itself. This includes the struggles that we had to overcome with planning and finances, as well as crediting the people and organizations who helped us along the way to overcome those obstacles. We established 2 volunteer projects as well as completed multiple community analyses for the possibility of starting a school and providing scholarships to deserving children through the Young Dreamer Network. This blog is accompanied by an approximately 15 minute video of footage and photos taken during our time in Vietnam. The video shows both the volunteer aspect as well as some of the cultural experiences that we experienced. The purpose of this documentation is to encourage international service learning as a source of experience and education for University students, and to show plausibility of setting goals similar to ours and being able to achieve them. We hope that our writing can help students get an idea of what it takes to be a leader in international service learning programs, and that our experience can help prove the worth of volunteering abroad. We want to inspire fellow students to travel with the mission to learn from wherever they go and be able to give back to those communities, as this has provided us with immense personal growth and new perspectives on education and culture.

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  • 2017-05

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Addressing Mental Health in Rural Indian Primary Schools Through Experiential Learning: A Viable Model?

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Social-emotional learning (SEL) methods are beginning to receive global attention in primary school education, yet the dominant emphasis on implementing these curricula is in high-income, urbanized areas. Consequently, the unique

Social-emotional learning (SEL) methods are beginning to receive global attention in primary school education, yet the dominant emphasis on implementing these curricula is in high-income, urbanized areas. Consequently, the unique features of developing and integrating such methods in middle- or low-income rural areas are unclear. Past studies suggest that students exposed to SEL programs show an increase in academic performance, improved ability to cope with stress, and better attitudes about themselves, others, and school, but these curricula are designed with an urban focus. The purpose of this study was to conduct a needs-based analysis to investigate components specific to a SEL curriculum contextualized to rural primary schools. A promising organization committed to rural educational development is Barefoot College, located in Tilonia, Rajasthan, India. In partnership with Barefoot, we designed an ethnographic study to identify and describe what teachers and school leaders consider the highest needs related to their students' social and emotional education. To do so, we interviewed 14 teachers and school leaders individually or in a focus group to explore their present understanding of “social-emotional learning” and the perception of their students’ social and emotional intelligence. Analysis of this data uncovered common themes among classroom behaviors and prevalent opportunities to address social and emotional well-being among students. These themes translated into the three overarching topics and eight sub-topics explored throughout the curriculum, and these opportunities guided the creation of the 21 modules within it. Through a design-based research methodology, we developed a 40-hour curriculum by implementing its various modules within seven Barefoot classrooms alongside continuous reiteration based on teacher feedback and participant observation. Through this process, we found that student engagement increased during contextualized SEL lessons as opposed to traditional methods. In addition, we found that teachers and students preferred and performed better with an activities-based approach. These findings suggest that rural educators must employ particular teaching strategies when addressing SEL, including localized content and an experiential-learning approach. Teachers reported that as their approach to SEL shifted, they began to unlock the potential to build self-aware, globally-minded students. This study concludes that social and emotional education cannot be treated in a generalized manner, as curriculum development is central to the teaching-learning process.

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  • 2020-05

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Alternative Medicine Perspectives Among 1.5 Generation Indian American Immigrants

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This study evaluates medical pluralism among 1.5 generation Indian American immigrants. 1.5 generation Indian Americans (N=16) were surveyed regarding their engagement in complementary and alternative medical systems (CAM), how immigration

This study evaluates medical pluralism among 1.5 generation Indian American immigrants. 1.5 generation Indian Americans (N=16) were surveyed regarding their engagement in complementary and alternative medical systems (CAM), how immigration affected that, and reasons for and for not continuing the use of CAM. Results indicated most 1.5 Indian immigrants currently engage in CAM, given that their parents also engage in CAM. The top reasons respondents indicated continued engagement in CAM was that it has no side effects and is preventative. Reasons for not practicing CAM included feeling out of place, not living with parents or not believing in CAM. After immigration, most participants decreased or stopped their engagement in CAM. More women than men continued to practice CAM after immigration. From the results, it was concluded that CAM is still important to 1.5 generation Indian immigrants.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

Soul Force: Ideologies and Reactions to Civil Disobedience During the Indian Independence Movement

Description

This thesis explores the relationship between the ideological justification for civil disobedience in British India in the twentieth century and the contemporary responses to the nonviolent resistance. By evaluating the

This thesis explores the relationship between the ideological justification for civil disobedience in British India in the twentieth century and the contemporary responses to the nonviolent resistance. By evaluating the elements of preparation and reaction to the Champaran, Kheda, Rowlatt Hartal, Khilafat, Bardoli, Dandi, and Quit India satyagraha campaigns, an understanding of the goals and values of civil disobedience and noncooperation was established. By studying the intellectual works of Indian independence leaders, correspondence between British government officials, widely distributed newspapers (The Times of London, The Times of India, Young India, The Spectator, The Manchester Guardian, The New York Times, etc) and first hand participant accounts, I was able to see how the ideas of independence leaders translated into popular participation and policy reform. A wide range of opinions existed amongst British contemporaries ranging from the encouragement of the Indian agitators to a deep hatred of the resistance. In addition, this thesis possesses an accompanying historical comic book which chronicles one family's participation in the Dandi March of 1930. The creative project attempts to introduce audiences to a historical case study of non-violent resistance. Similar to how Mahatma Gandhi chose salt to represent the oppression of all Indians by the British, the Salt March of 1930 was selected as the topic of the comic book in order to introduce all audiences to the experiences of twentieth century satyagrahis. Mass civil disobedience continues to be used as a tool for political change around the world today. "Soul Force" studies the pioneering efforts in mass nonviolent resistance within colonial India.

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  • 2016-12

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The Emerging Art Worlds of the South Asian Diaspora

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In the late 2000s and 2010s, digital art and the use of the internet as a new platform for art to be displayed became increasingly common. A new art scene

In the late 2000s and 2010s, digital art and the use of the internet as a new platform for art to be displayed became increasingly common. A new art scene began developing among South Asian diasporic artists, driven primarily by adolescents and young adult women who have never attended art school. Their primary medium is digital tools, their primary display platform is the internet, and they adhere to a DIY ("do-it-yourself") ethic rather than traditional art techniques and norms. As these internet artists have forgone the traditional gallery art scene in favor of more accessible internet platforms, these artists have not received attention from the mainstream art world. However, the popularity of these internet artists is undeniable as many of them have tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands of followers on their social media accounts. This new art scene has gained notice with the advent of social media platforms such as Tumblr and Instagram and websites focused on youth culture and counterculture, such as Vice, Buzzfeed, Dazed, and independent digital zine publications. The content of the work of these artists is often political, promoting feminist ideals, challenging South Asian and European beauty standards and limiting stereotypes of South Asian women, and creating groundbreaking new representations of South Asian women. Influences from both South Asian and Western pop culture and counterculture are prominent in their as well. This thesis explores the origins of this art scene and its roots in South Asian modernism and conventional South Asian diasporic artists.

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  • 2018-05

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Mental Health in India

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In this creative thesis, I traveled to India and used my month long summer vacation back home to interview people about mental health in India. I talked to a therapist

In this creative thesis, I traveled to India and used my month long summer vacation back home to interview people about mental health in India. I talked to a therapist and four students about depression to find out what the situation is in India, contributing factors, experiences and stigma unique to depression among students in India, what the government is doing, and possible solutions or steps that can be taken to help students struggling with mental health problems. I also went to mainstream and special schools to meet special educators who work with differently abled children, occupational therapists, parents of differently abled children, and a student with Asperger’s in Chennai, Tamil Nadu to find out about the stigma surrounding differently abled children and their education path.
My efforts have culminated in the creation of the website mentalhealthinindia.com that can be used as a resource both by people in India as well as those abroad who are curious to learn about the stigma surrounding depression and differently abled children in India.

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  • 2019-05

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We All Need to Eat: A Memoir in Three Countries

Description

Food provides nutrients and sustenance that are essential to life. Humans rely on food to fuel our thoughts and actions. However, food isn’t just a source of energy;

Food provides nutrients and sustenance that are essential to life. Humans rely on food to fuel our thoughts and actions. However, food isn’t just a source of energy; it’s a fundamental part of culture and connection. Simply sharing a meal with someone can build teamwork and create a bond. Throughout this short memoir, I explored the ways in which food creates a connection across language and cultural barriers through reflection on specific experiences that I had in India, Uganda, and South Africa. While my experiences in each of these three countries were vastly different, there was one defining theme that brought them together: food. This memoir uses mixed media (personal reflection, research, recipes, and photos) to connect the three different international experiences. Reflection on my own family traditions and history bridges the gap between my upbringing and my interactions with people while spending time abroad. Popular recipes from each of the three countries are mixed into the personal reflection, showing how preparing food in a different geographic location can change the experience of preparation and eating. In addition to personal experience, included is a synthesis of research done on the effects of sharing a plate or a meal on negotiations tactics, how eating the same food increases trust, the ways in which food sharing is an act of social intimacy, and how it can build community. Food is an important part of family connection, a tool in many rituals such as Sunday dinners or breaking bread, a critical aspect of many religions, and is tied to the celebration of both birth and death in cultures around the globe. We all need to eat; food is the great commonality among people.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

British Colonialism and the Perpetuation of Inequality via the Caste System in Up the Country and India in 1848

Description

British colonialism was a well-established facet of Western history. The British have been especially notable in colonizing countries within Africa as well as India. In terms of India, the ramifications

British colonialism was a well-established facet of Western history. The British have been especially notable in colonizing countries within Africa as well as India. In terms of India, the ramifications of their actions have had a significant impact on the social and political structure from the 19th century to modernity. Many scholars have alleged that brutalities set forth by the British and the discriminatory practices enforced onto the Indian population were entirely new. However, while the violence incurred cannot be ignored, the actual governance and structural changes were heavily influenced by the Hindu caste system already established within India. The Hindu caste system is a centuries-old practice that designates followers into five, family-determined, class denominations from highest to lowest: Brahmins (priests), Kshatriyas (rulers and warriors), Vaishyas (merchants, landowners, skilled workers), Shudras (farmworkers, servants, and unskilled workers), and Dalits (out-casts). The given thesis focuses on the perceptions and interactions of the British in 19th century India as well as the structural changes enforced by the British. Numerous nineteenth-century texts such as Up the Country by Emily Eden and India in 1848 by Arthur Mills, M.P. Murray were centered on the environment and day-to-day changes of India in the form of travel/informational readings. Both texts are utilized in this argument to highlight how the caste system was a contributing factor in British administration, contrary to the general perception of scholars. More importantly, Up the Country, offers a glimpse of the realities within northern India, where the British had the strongest control and is utilized to draw parallels between the caste system and British actions during the 1800s. The effects of discrimination and inequality continue to have a considerable effect on the Indian population to this day. However, the British have hastily been given total blame for such ramifications without considering the role of Indian societal principles in these disparities.

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  • 2021-05

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ASCEND AT ASU: STRATEGIES FOR ENGAGING PAN-ASIAN STUDENTS AT THE W. P. CAREY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

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Ascend is the premier non-profit professional association that enables its members, corporate partners and the community to realize the leadership potential of Pan-Asians in global corporations. Ascend at Arizona State

Ascend is the premier non-profit professional association that enables its members, corporate partners and the community to realize the leadership potential of Pan-Asians in global corporations. Ascend at Arizona State University (ASU) was founded in March 2011 as a student affiliate of the national Ascend organization. There are four ultimate goals for this thesis: 1) to create an operations and transition guide for Ascend's future leadership; 2) to develop strategies and tactics to improve Ascend's operations; 3) to better establish and integrate Ascend within the W. P. Carey School of Business; and 4) to better understand and provide for the unique needs of international students within the W. P. Carey School of Business. An analysis of external trends at the W. P. Carey School of Business and ASU reveals that international students represent a rapidly growing demographic. Ascend, although successful during its first year of operations, must adapt in order to best provide for the unique needs of this demographic. At the same time, it must continue to service the needs of its overall target markets: 1) Asian students (both American-born and international) and 2) students seeking to work in Asia. In order to set the platform for the continued success of the organization moving forward, specific and measurable objectives, strategies, and tactics were developed. The organization's financial condition, executive board, committees, membership, student recruitment, events, support network, and mentor program were identified as the crucial elements that must be developed in order to ensure improvement in the organization moving forward. Finally, in order to ensure the continued integration of Ascend within the W. P. Carey School of Business, the business school can pursue strategies to better serve the unique needs of international students.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05