Matching Items (5)

Improving K -12 Public Education in Arizona

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The purpose of this research paper is to examine the current state of Arizona's public K-12 education system and offer tangible solutions to improve it. An overview of the state's

The purpose of this research paper is to examine the current state of Arizona's public K-12 education system and offer tangible solutions to improve it. An overview of the state's educational funding and performative rankings reveals a deeply disadvantaged system that especially disadvantages low income students. Arizona continually ranks in the bottom quartile in the nation for both K-12 performance and public education spending. By examining the best practices employed by some of the highest-ranking school systems in the world and reconfiguring them to fit Arizona, the state can significantly improve its national and international rankings. Research was conducted into four Scandinavian countries and four Southeast Asian countries selected based on 2016 K-12 Achievement Scores, Gross National Happiness Index, National 2016 Social Progress Index, and the 2016 Social Mobility Index as follows: Finland, Belgium, Netherlands, Switzerland, Singapore, Japan, South Korea, and China (Hong Kong). After dissecting each countries' public school characteristics and funding formula, it was clear that each block of countries offered different solutions to the problems presented by Arizona's current educational climate. Namely increasing the efficacy of social welfare programs that directly impact low income students in K-12, improving statewide teacher certification standards, modeling the school year to be more like Southeast Asian countries to reduce summer learning loss, and facilitating an "educational culture" similar to that of Japan.

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  • 2017-05

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Job Satisfaction in the Field of Law

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This paper discusses the levels of job satisfaction amongst practicing lawyers, with a distinction between government-employed lawyers (public) and those in the private sector. The purpose of this report is

This paper discusses the levels of job satisfaction amongst practicing lawyers, with a distinction between government-employed lawyers (public) and those in the private sector. The purpose of this report is to provide insight into the joys and sorrows of practicing law and provide those who are curious about becoming a lawyer with the tools to be the happiest lawyer that they can be throughout their career. The paper includes analysis of a primary research survey, comparisons with existing research, and a brief overview of happiness based research. It concludes with personal applications of the knowledge gained. Findings of the project conclude that publicly employed lawyers are, on average, slightly happier than lawyers in the private sector. On a scale from 1-7 public lawyers held an average happiness rating of 6.8, while private lawyers came in at a 6.06. Both factions were found to be satisfied in their work, which can dispel the myth that lawyers in general are unhappy with their job or field. Research into happiness shows that only 40% of an individual's overall happiness can be directly affected by their mindset and actins. The other 60% is comprised of genetic and circumstantial factors. Steps and advice to increase happiness derived from a profession or life are offered. The key to finding satisfaction in the workplace lies in aligning one's strengths with one's values. This paper concludes by imploring those who seek a job in the legal field to spend time understanding what their values are, and pursuing satisfaction in the workplace instead of prestige or pay.

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  • 2017-12

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Public Library Programming for Families with Young Children: Parent Perceptions of the Fun with Math & Science Program

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There is a serious need for high quality early childhood programming in the state of Arizona. More than half of children under the age of six are living below the

There is a serious need for high quality early childhood programming in the state of Arizona. More than half of children under the age of six are living below the poverty line, and Arizona is ranked 47th out of 50 states and the District of Columbia in education (Tirozzi, 2014). The Scottsdale Public Library (SPL) system is fighting to combat this issue by providing free, interactive parent-child classes that are aligned with the Arizona Early Learning Standards in order to support school readiness; additionally, these programs are also aligned with the Arizona School Readiness Framework. This thesis project focuses on the Fun with Math & Science (FMS) program, one of three Knowing and Growing programs, implemented across six Scottsdale Public Library locations. This program is an extremely interactive, parent-child class that aims to improve children's basic science and math skills. The purpose of this study is to understand the population of families attending FMS at SPL, as well as parent perceptions of the programming and its impact on their family. This study also focuses on a subset of families who participated in this research at two of the give Scottsdale Public Libraries. Interviews with parents were conducted and provide insightful information about parent and child experiences participating in the program at the library.

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  • 2016-05

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Utilization of Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants of Senor de los Milagros of Trujillo, Peru to Identify Barriers to Care

Description

The purpose of this study is to analyze what barriers of care exist within the Senor de los Milagros community in Trujillo, Peru and how these barriers to care can

The purpose of this study is to analyze what barriers of care exist within the Senor de los Milagros community in Trujillo, Peru and how these barriers to care can identify shortcomings in the public healthcare system. This study is a collaboration of field research and outside literature. The research conducted was done via structured interviews with 15 participants, all promotoras (mothers of the community) and their husbands in the Senor de los Milagros community of Trujillo, Peru. Summaries and quotes from these interviews were uploaded and quantified to identify common barriers to care derived from socioeconomic and cultural determinants . Although this was on the main focus of the study, observations and conversations with healthcare staff and patients showed that the two most specific barriers found when data was analyzed were the wait times of public sector facilities and quality of care within these facilities. These barriers to care did not stop the promotoras from seeking care at MINSA facilities, but it does pose the questions as to how it affects healthcare-seeking behaviors and if this affects long-term healthcare outcomes.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Role, structure, and style: concurrent mediational means in public engagement mechanisms

Description

A pressing question in public policymaking is how best to allocate decision-making authority and to facilitate opportunities for input. When it comes to science, technology, and environmental (STE) policy decisions,

A pressing question in public policymaking is how best to allocate decision-making authority and to facilitate opportunities for input. When it comes to science, technology, and environmental (STE) policy decisions, persons impacted by those decisions often have relevant information and perspectives to contribute yet lack either the specialized, technical knowledge or the means by which to effectively communicate that knowledge. Consequently, due to a variety of factors, they are frequently denied meaningful involvement in making them. In an effort to better understand why this is so, and how this might change, this dissertation uses an activity systems framework to examine how three factors mediate the circulation of information in STE public engagement mechanisms.

In this project, I examine the transcripts of a 2015 administrative hearing and community meeting about the Santa Susana Field Lab—a former nuclear- and rocket engine-testing facility 30 miles from Los Angeles, where an experimental nuclear reactor suffered a partial meltdown in 1959. Specifically, I identify (1) who was designated as an "expert" versus a member of "the public," (2) the structural features, and (3) the stylistic features of participants' remarks at these events; and I study how these factors mediated the flow of information at each. To do so, I view "expert" and "public" as what Michael McGee has termed ideographs, and consider the structural and stylistic features that prior scholarship has identified to impact information flow.

Based on my analysis, I theorize that role designations, structural features, and stylistic features work together to mediate whose, what, and how information flows in public engagement mechanisms. Based on my findings, I also suggest that this mediation impacts policy outcomes. As such, I contend that better understanding the relationships among these mediational means, information flow, and policy outcomes is an important step towards developing public engagement mechanisms that most effectively use the relevant knowledge and other insights of all who have a stake in policy decisions.

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Date Created
  • 2016