Matching Items (7)

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The Resurgence of Greek Nationalism Through the Macedonian Name Conflict

Description

Subsequent to the independence of the Republic of North Macedonia, there has been a revival of Greek nationalism. The Greek belief that “Macedonia is Greek” has united the Greek community

Subsequent to the independence of the Republic of North Macedonia, there has been a revival of Greek nationalism. The Greek belief that “Macedonia is Greek” has united the Greek community around the world, and created a new Greek nationalism to protect the ethnic claim that the Macedonian name is Greek. To better understand how this resurgence of nationalism came to be, I examine certain elements and concepts such as: ethno-cultural and historical claims, politics, borders, Greek diaspora and media sources.
I provide a condensed history on the ancient Kingdom of Macedon (Macedonia) as well as the Balkan Wars and how it led to the breakup of Yugoslavia and independence of the (prior) Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM). I then go over the recent conflict over the “Macedonian” name and how the Prespa Agreement led to the name change of the Republic of North Macedonia. I use both the Republic of North Macedonia and North Macedonia interchangeably.
Following the history over the Macedonian name conflict, I provide a literature review to understand concepts such as “nationalism”, “borders”, “diaspora”, “media and politics”, and I analyze how a resurgence of Greek nationalism came to fruition from the aforementioned topics.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Translation and Cultural Analysis of the Greek TV Show Sto Para Pente

Description

The bulk of this thesis is the translation itself—of Episodes 8-10—with timed subtitles. However, I also wanted to provide commentary on a few issues of interest that I came across

The bulk of this thesis is the translation itself—of Episodes 8-10—with timed subtitles. However, I also wanted to provide commentary on a few issues of interest that I came across during the translation. Conveying meaning from one language to the other does not simply involve translating the denotations of each word, but also the social context, humor, tone, and other aspects surrounding the situation. Whether words are used individually to interject, or come together to form unique idioms or phrases, the challenge presented to the translator is the choices: what words do I select to best convey not only the dictionary sense, but also the contextual meaning? This is especially difficult in wordplay-type situations. If there’s no perfect option, can I find a cultural analog that differs from the original denotation, but preserves the intention of the words? Otherwise, do I find the original important enough that it is worth educating the reader in order to preserve it—or, do I see no other translation option but to educate as a last resort? These are all choices that I had to make, and in this thesis I will be discussing the most interesting situations that came up, and my choices in dealing with them.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Who Put Out the Light? A Study of the Financial Ruin in Greece

Description

Who Put Out the Light? A Study of the FInancial Ruin in Greece, is a research study on the Greek economic crisis that led to Greece's financial ruin and nearly

Who Put Out the Light? A Study of the FInancial Ruin in Greece, is a research study on the Greek economic crisis that led to Greece's financial ruin and nearly put the country into bankruptcy. I conducted a series of interviews on people from all walks of life while in Greece during the Summer of 2013. I investigated all of the possible factors that may have led to the catastrophic events they are currently undergoing and how each person was severely impacted. Moreover, I compared each person's political beliefs and how those beliefs may have factored into what they believe caused the beginning of this turmoil. Through this process, I have also come to find that there are many obscure and eye-opening laws that have been put in place both in Greece by their government, as well as by the European Union that may have factored into the detriment of the country. Furthermore, I wanted to depict the personal anguish of the people through pictures, thus adding a photojournalistic aspect to my thesis project.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Growing up in a War Torn Greece and Emigrating to the United States

Description

With every generation comes a unique struggle or times of turmoil and tumult. Many of these stories are learned from elders and grandparents when they reminisce of events that have

With every generation comes a unique struggle or times of turmoil and tumult. Many of these stories are learned from elders and grandparents when they reminisce of events that have altered the course of their lives and the lives of those around them. I intend to persevere these anecdotes and experiences in order to keep them from becoming lost in time. With the change in technology and industrialization, our grandparents and elders have lived a vastly different life than their descendants. In my case, my grandparents and relatives lived in Greece during the Second World War and the Greek civil war. In order to preserve these unique experiences, I have documented them in the form of a digitally recorded interview and have transcribed the interviews for analysis. The interviews and analysis will be separated into three sections: World War II, The Greek Civil War, and Immigration to the United States. Historical context will be provided with an overview of the events that occurred during the wars in the Greek Arena. Each interviewee will then have their perspective presented with historical sources that will reconcile the events and experiences for historical accuracy. In addition the sentiments shared by the interviewees on their lives as a result of these events will be observed in order to truly understand their perception of the world. From doing so, their life stories will be better understood and the stories told to their young grandson or nephew will not be forgotten in their passing.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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The promise of a name: identity, difference, and political movement in Macedonia

Description

Naming and naming practices take place at various sites associated with international politics. These sites include border crossings, migrations, diasporas, town halls, and offices of political parties representing minorities. This

Naming and naming practices take place at various sites associated with international politics. These sites include border crossings, migrations, diasporas, town halls, and offices of political parties representing minorities. This project is an investigation of these and other sites. It takes seriously questions of names and naming practices and particularly asks how people participate in these practices, often doing so with states and state authorities. It not only looks at and discusses how people proceed in these practices but also assesses the implications for people regarding how and when they can be at home as well as how and where they can move. Through an ethnography of Aegean Macedonians involving interviews, participant observation, and archival research, I find that naming practices occur well beyond the sites where they are expected. Names themselves are the result of negotiation and are controlled neither by their bearers nor those who would name. Similarity of demonyms with toponyms, do not ensure that bearers of such demonyms will be at home in the place that shares there name. Changes in names significance of names occur rapidly and these names turn home into abroad and hosts into guests.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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The role of kin relations and residential mobility during the transition from final Neolithic to Early Bronze Age in Attica, Greece

Description

This dissertation addresses the role of kinship and residential mobility during the transition from Final Neolithic to Early Bronze Age (ca. 3500 – 2500 BC) in Attica, Greece. It examines

This dissertation addresses the role of kinship and residential mobility during the transition from Final Neolithic to Early Bronze Age (ca. 3500 – 2500 BC) in Attica, Greece. It examines descent systems, ancestor formation, and the interplay between biological, social, and spatial structure in mortuary practices. It also evaluates the nature and degree of residential mobility and its potential role in the formation and maintenance of social networks. Archaeological hypotheses on the kin-based structure of formal cemeteries, the familial use of collective tombs, marriage practices and mate exchange, and relocation were tested focusing on the Early Helladic cemetery of Tsepi at Marathon. Tsepi constitutes the earliest formally organized cemetery on the Greek mainland and it has also contributed to enduring debates over the nature of the interaction between the eastern Attic coast and the central Aegean islands.

This study integrates osteological, biogeochemical, and archaeological data. Inherited dental and cranial features were used to examine biological relatedness and postmarital residence (biodistance analysis). Biochemical analysis of archaeological and modern samples was conducted to examine the geographic origins of the individuals buried in the cemetery and reconstruct mobility patterns. Osteological and biogeochemical data were interpreted in conjunction with archaeological and ethnographic/ethnohistoric data.

The results generally supported a relationship between spatial organization and biological relatedness based on phenotypic similarity at Tsepi. Postmarital residence analysis showed exogamous practices and tentatively supported higher male than female mobility. This practice, along with dietary inferences, could also be suggestive of maritime activities. Biogeochemical analysis showed a local character for the cemetery sample (96%). The common provenance of the three non-local individuals might reflect a link between Tsepi and a single locale. Burial location was not determined by provenance or solely by biological relatedness. Overall, the results point towards more nuanced reconstructions of mobility in prehistoric Aegean and suggest that burial location depended on a complex set of inter-individual relationships and collective identities. The contextualized bioarchaeological approach applied in this study added to the anthropological investigations of social practices such as kin relations (e.g., biological, marital, social kinship) and residential relocation as diachronic mechanisms of integration, adaptation, or differentiation.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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From Marathon to Athens: for orchestra

Description

From Marathon to Athens was inspired by the legend of Pheidippides, a Greek messenger who ran approximately twenty-six miles between the cities of Marathon and Athens in ancient Greece to

From Marathon to Athens was inspired by the legend of Pheidippides, a Greek messenger who ran approximately twenty-six miles between the cities of Marathon and Athens in ancient Greece to deliver an important wartime message. According to the legend, he died shortly after completing the journey. The marathon races of today were inspired by his story, though it may be more myth than reality. There is a great deal of inherent drama in the undertaking of such a feat, whether it be a marathon or any other test of strength and endurance. There is the rush of adrenaline when it begins, followed by the excitement and exhilaration of the first few miles. Then, there is a period of settling in and finding a groove - when the runner realizes that there is a long way to go, but is determined to pace him or herself and stay strong. All too often, there is the "wall" that appears about three-quarters of the way through, when it seems that there is no strength left to finish the race. Finally, there is the final push to the finish line - where the runner decides that they are going to make it, in spite of fatigue, pain, or any other obstacle. In this piece, I used a simple melody that was very loosely modeled after a melody from ancient Greece (the tune inscribed on the Epitaph of Seikilos). I used both Phrygian and Dorian modes, which, according to Plato, were most appropriate for soldiers. Throughout the piece, I used different instruments, mostly percussion, to represent the heartbeat of the runner. In the legend, the runner dies - in the piece, the heartbeat becomes very fast and then rather erratic. It then slows and, finally, stops. Though I find the story of Pheidippides inspiring, I wish all marathon runners and athletes of every kind (myself included) a safer and happier outcome!

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Created

Date Created
  • 2010