Matching Items (104)

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Diana Holladay: Remembering An Artist

Description

Diana Holladay was a mother, sister, daughter, wife, grandmother, friend, and artist. She played many roles and impacted many lives. She sought out beauty and brought it into the world

Diana Holladay was a mother, sister, daughter, wife, grandmother, friend, and artist. She played many roles and impacted many lives. She sought out beauty and brought it into the world through her art. When she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease her family watched her fade away. The Diana they knew and loved was no longer there. They could not mourn the loss of her being. This creative project served the purpose of exploring Diana’s past and art in order to help her family mourn and celebrate the woman she once was. The goal was to create a final art show and living memorial for Diana. The final art show would foster a sense of family, appreciation, and love. She had hundreds, if not thousands of sketches and pictures. She had a huge collection of painting left behind. During this project they were collected and organized for the show. Diana died exactly one month before the show. Her death brought her family together and helped them mourn. The art show was held in the Sedona Art Center where Diana once held art classes and her husband, Jim, layed the sandstone on the outside of the building. After her death, the attendance of her show nearly tripled. Hundreds of Diana’s family and friends celebrated this amazing woman. This creative project helped honor an incredible woman who truly changed lives and lead her life with love. This thesis helped us remember the woman and artist Diana Holladay was before her diagnosis and death. The final creation of this project was a website dedicated to Diana and her art and an essay describing the journey of this thesis.
www.dianaholladay.com

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Art as an Invitation to World-Traveling: A Psycho-Theoretical Approach to Understanding Neuro-atypicality

Description

Caring for others is hard work, it takes time, it takes emotional labor, and ultimately it is not immediately apparent how caring for others helps ourselves, so why should we

Caring for others is hard work, it takes time, it takes emotional labor, and ultimately it is not immediately apparent how caring for others helps ourselves, so why should we do it? In caring for others, we become an active participant in the world of another, and we must take this active role because we already have an emotional investment in the wellbeing of the other. We must care for others because we already care about them. This concept of caring for others is addressed in Art as an invitation to world-traveling: a psycho-analytic approach to Understanding neuro-atypicality as well as a corresponding gallery featuring the artwork analyzed within the written work. In this work the act of World-Sharing is discussed, an idea brought to us by the philosopher Maria Lugones. The idea is that we create worlds by having relationships with others. We have worlds that we live in with our family, our workplace, our circles of friends, and smaller worlds between us and those we are closest to and ourselves. We are world-travelers, evidenced by our ability to empathize with others, and through this thesis we can become able to use art as a means of world-traveling. Art has a unique way of creating a way with which we can understand the other without the use of words, as verbal language isn't the only path to world-traveling. In the first section of this work, there is an introduction. In sections two through four the philosophical importance of expressive and empathetic communication, the psychological standpoint including how neuro-atypical people are already attempting to share their world with others by utilizing therapy, and an analysis of artwork by neuro-atypical artists are discussed. Section two utilizes the concept of world-sharing brought to us by Maria Lugones, the concept of therapy as a way to care for others and develop relationships, as well as the importance of love as it related to caring by Carol Gilligan, the way that language can be used to form these relationships by Hans-Georg Gadamer, and the way that language lends itself to communication and the creation of worlds by Georges Gusdorf. In this section the importance of the social majority, or those who hold social power, to travel to the world to the minority, because the minority in order to exist in society already travels to the world of the majority is discussed. In the third section how neuro-atypical people attempt to travel to the world of the majority by utilizing therapy and at times the importance of artwork in that therapy is discussed as well as the art therapy called SEAT which utilizes viewing the patients as artists first in order to have a more dynamic and influential intervention.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Precarious Fauna: An Art Exhibition

Description

Human nature drives us to focus primarily on the present or near-future, instead of considering what consequences our actions may have many years from now. However, in a new era

Human nature drives us to focus primarily on the present or near-future, instead of considering what consequences our actions may have many years from now. However, in a new era that is increasingly dominated by humans and their ambitions, this tendency has destructive repercussions on the very environment that once supported and nurtured humankind. Wild animals are highly susceptible to human activities that damage ecosystems, and a loss of animal diversity can have unforeseen consequences on future human populations. In the research, I examine the avoidable reasons for the severe decline in population of four animal species, and through my art, imagine the losses associated with their disappearance. The artwork created evokes an emotional response in the viewer through dramatic, contrasting imagery, making them reassess the relationship between humans, animals and the environment.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Young Mothers: Exploring Life After Teen Pregnancy

Description

This project focuses on the experiences of families that are affected by young motherhood. United by this defining event, each of these families involved in the project come from diverse

This project focuses on the experiences of families that are affected by young motherhood. United by this defining event, each of these families involved in the project come from diverse backgrounds and have faced obstacles unique to their own history. Since late 2013, they shared with me the struggles and rewards that followed a decision made early in the mother's life. Through an exhibition of photography, audio, video, and text, I aimed to communicate these stories to expand the dialogue surrounding teen pregnancy

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

United In Movement: A Dance Mural Aimed at Community Inclusion

Description

The objective of this community mural was aimed at cultural inclusion. I worked with the Borden community to paint a mural of dances from different parts of the world. I

The objective of this community mural was aimed at cultural inclusion. I worked with the Borden community to paint a mural of dances from different parts of the world. I wanted to do this as my creative project because as an artist, the community I lived in (the Borden Community) allowed me to explore my artistic self. The Borden community is a mile away from ASU and it is where I lived for the past two years--the time I was truly able to start creating the dancer within me. The mural was painted on una and lemon street, right behind the fire station located on Apache Blvd. Through the project I have grown more as an artist and as a community member. I see relationships built through the project and I now feel like I have been able to give back to the community that helped create a part of my college experience.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The Student Art Project

Description

Some of the most talented, innovative, and experimental artists are students, but they are often discouraged by the price of higher education and lack of scholarship or funding opportunities. Additionally,

Some of the most talented, innovative, and experimental artists are students, but they are often discouraged by the price of higher education and lack of scholarship or funding opportunities. Additionally, the art industry has become stagnant. Traditional brick-and-mortar galleries are not willing to represent young, unknown artists. Their overhead is simply too high for risky choices.
The Student Art Project is art patronage for the 21st century—a curated online gallery featuring exceptional student artists. The Student Art Project is a highly curated experience for buyers. Only five artists are featured each month. Buyers are not bombarded with thousands of different products and separate artists “shops”. They can read artists bios and find art they connect with.
Student artists apply through an online form. Once accepted to the program, artists receive a $200 materials stipend to create an exclusive collection of 5-10 pieces. Original artwork and limited edition prints are sold through our website. These collections can potentially fund an entire year of college tuition, a life-changing amount for many students.
Brick-and-mortar galleries typically take 40-60% of the retail price of artwork. The Student Art Project will only take 30%, which we will use to reinvest in future artists. Other art websites, like Etsy, require the artists to ship, invoice, and communicate with customers. For students, this means less time spent in the classroom and less time developing their craft. The Student Art Project handles all business functions for our artists, allowing them to concentrate on what really matters, their education.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The Art of Extraction

Description

The Art of Extraction: ABSTRACT
Anthropocentric society faces a multiplicity of environmental challenges, catalyzed and perpetuated by urban-industrial culture. Many of today’s perspectives and sustainable strategies cannot accommodate the challenges’

The Art of Extraction: ABSTRACT
Anthropocentric society faces a multiplicity of environmental challenges, catalyzed and perpetuated by urban-industrial culture. Many of today’s perspectives and sustainable strategies cannot accommodate the challenges’ inherent complexity. Because urban-industrial society is only projected to grow, both in enormity and influence, the only viable option is to elucidate the complexity and employ it.
A potential setting in which to frame this exploration is the intersection of urbanism, landscape, and ecology –an overlap first introduced by the theories of Landscape Urbanism and Ecological Urbanism. Here, urbanization is not just discussed as an isolated phenomenon but one that is embedded within and responding to a variety of systems and scales. The methodologies of Landscape Urbanism and Ecological Urbanism also acknowledge artists and the visual arts as invaluable tools for realizing, communicating, and inspiring the new perspectives and modes of intervention needed to address the aforementioned urban complexity. Such artists who operate within this realm include Sissel Tolaas, Maya Lin, Katrin Sigurdardottir, David Maisel, Olafur Eliason, Mierle Ukeles, Suzanne Lacy, Steve Rowell, Mel Chin, and the Center for Land Use Interpretation. Case study analyses reveal many of these artists begin their investigations with provocative, searching questions situated within the realms of urbanism, landscape, and ecology. This is proceeded by relative scientific research and/or community involvement or outreach. Furthermore, the artists work within and extrapolate from a variety of other disciplines —increasing the scope and applicability of their work. The information they collect via this multidisciplinary approach is then metaphorically translated to the visual arts, where the public can not only physically or sensorially experience it, but understand and deduce its meaning and significance: public awareness being one of the more essential aspects of a sustainable society and at the root of our current struggle.
As a designer and architect, I will engage the artist’s mindset to explore the current and complex issue of resource extraction within Superior, Arizona: a topic at the core of urbanism, landscape, and ecology. While the town is not considered "urban" by standard definition, it and its surrounding landscapes are indirectly sculpted by the needs of urban society —rendering it the setting for this application. Within a group, we will begin with a searching question. We will conduct relative scientific research, engage the community of Superior, and call upon a variety of other disciplines to aid and inform our work. Through metaphor, the research and resulting discoveries will be artistically represented and composed within a designed exhibition of hopeful “things” (See Bruno Latour, “From Realpolitik to Dingpolitik”). This exhibition will theoretically take place on Superior’s currently dilapidated Main Street, amid a more accessible sphere. The eventual goal of the project is to illuminate and understand the complexities of resource extraction, specifically within Superior, while also enabling public awareness and empowerment through lucidity and comprehension.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The First Sin and Its Punishment

Description

The "First Sin and Its Punishment" refers to a sub-heading from the Old Testament in which the consequences of the sin committed by Adam and Eve are discussed. The idea

The "First Sin and Its Punishment" refers to a sub-heading from the Old Testament in which the consequences of the sin committed by Adam and Eve are discussed. The idea of sin intrigues me and this thesis is a collaboration of my ideas concerning justice and injustice, science and nature, individual potential and the human spirit. I believe that, sometimes, acts of sin can be beautiful when they represent the rejection of normative standards and do not actively harm others. Sins only assume meaning in the context of existing social norms, and, as can be seen throughout history, these norms are constantly evolving. I also focus on the juxtaposition of beauty and evil in my work, and reference Christianity and other mythologies. I hope that my work offers an exploration of human desires and the subconscious to those who seek it.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2002-05

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Hope and Dreams: Insight into Autism Art Benefit Exhibition

Description

Abstract Hope and Dreams: Insight into Autism Art Benefit Exhibition Megan H. Tollefson Hope and Dreams: Insight into Autism was a social outreach project benefiting autism research in the Phoenix

Abstract Hope and Dreams: Insight into Autism Art Benefit Exhibition Megan H. Tollefson Hope and Dreams: Insight into Autism was a social outreach project benefiting autism research in the Phoenix Valley via an art exhibition. Autism is a widely discussed disorder that affects more than 1.5 million people in the United States. It has had a significant personal impact on my life, as I have two cousins with the disorder, as well as o the lives of millions of others. The project aimed to educate the public on autism, support families dealing with the disorder, and raise funds for essential research to better understand, treat, and prevent autism. The variety of paintings in the exhibition was meant to be representative of the many facets of autism while inspiring hope for viewers. The project also intended to advocate the arts as a viable method for communicating for collective community pulse in the face of increasing autism prevalence. The project process hoped to speak as a visual, social and most importantly, a human commentary on the current state of autism in America. My artwork was selected as the winner for the Sally A. McKenna memorial exhibition for spring 2008, and the exhibition took place in the Step Gallery in the heart of Tempe. The paintings I created and the marketing for the event allowed me to create a meaningful thesis project and combine my interest in business and the arts. I was also able to donate several thousand dollars and one of the paintings to the Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2008-05

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Anthropomorphic Animated Animals

Description

Anthropomorphic animal characters are common in animation, but there is limited data on the factors that contribute to such a trend. I studied how animated animals in popular movies look

Anthropomorphic animal characters are common in animation, but there is limited data on the factors that contribute to such a trend. I studied how animated animals in popular movies look and behave like humans, and what that indicates about us that we prefer them that way. My study was conducted via literature review, film review, facial measurements, and the creation of my own character. I discovered the physical importance of eyes in proportion to the rest of the face and the emotional importance of those animals acting as metaphors for us as humans.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12