Matching Items (3)

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Advancing the Implementation of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Residential Treatment

Description

Abstract
Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and

Abstract
Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and
respond to opioid overdose situations.

Design/Methods: Pre-intervention Opioid Overdose Knowledge Scale (OOKS) and Opioid
Overdose Attitude Scale (OOAS) surveys were administered electronically to five BHTs in
2020. Data obtained were de-identified. Comparisons between responses to pre-and post-surveys questions were carried out using the standardized Wilcoxon signed-rank statistical test(z). This study was conducted in a residential treatment center (RTC) with the institutional review board's approval from Arizona State University. BHTs aged 18 years and above, working at this RTC were included in the study.

Interventions: An online training was provided on opioid overdose response (OOR) and
naloxone administration and on when to refer patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) for
medication-assisted treatment.

Results: Compared to the pre-intervention surveys, the BHTs showed significant improvements
in attitudes on the overall score on the OOAS (mean= 26.4 ± 13.1; 95% CI = 10.1 - 42.7; z =
2.02; p = 0.043) and significant improvement in knowledge on the OOKS (mean= 10.6 ± 6.5;
95% CI = 2.5 – 18.7; z =2.02, p = 0.043).

Conclusions and Relevance: Training BHTs working in an RTC on opioid overdose response is
effective in increasing attitudes and knowledge related to opioid overdose management. opioid
overdose reversal in RTCs.

Keywords: Naloxone, opioid overdose, overdose education, overdose response program

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-12

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Advancing the Implementation of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Residential Treatment

Description

Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and
respond

Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and
respond to opioid overdose situations.
Design/Methods: Pre-intervention Opioid Overdose Knowledge Scale (OOKS) and Opioid
Overdose Attitude Scale (OOAS) surveys were administered electronically to five BHTs in
2020. Data obtained were de-identified. Comparisons between responses to pre-and post-surveys
questions were carried out using the standardized Wilcoxon signed-rank statistical test(z). This
study was conducted in a residential treatment center (RTC) with the institutional review board's
approval from Arizona State University. BHTs aged 18 years and above, working at this RTC
were included in the study.
Interventions: An online training was provided on opioid overdose response (OOR) and
naloxone administration and on when to refer patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) for
medication-assisted treatment.
Results: Compared to the pre-intervention surveys, the BHTs showed significant improvements
in attitudes on the overall score on the OOAS (mean= 26.4 ± 13.1; 95% CI = 10.1 - 42.7; z =
2.02; p = 0.043) and significant improvement in knowledge on the OOKS (mean= 10.6 ± 6.5;
95% CI = 2.5 – 18.7; z =2.02, p = 0.043).
Conclusions and Relevance: Training BHTs working in an RTC on opioid overdose response is
effective in increasing attitudes and knowledge related to opioid overdose management. opioid
overdose reversal in RTCs.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-12

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Benefits of Medically Assisted Treatment in Opioid Use Disorder

Description

Introduction: For 2019 in the U.S. opioid overdose deaths neared 50,000 people. Increasing the number of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) programs available for the population is important to address this crisis (NIDA, n.d.).
Objective: To evaluate if MAT improves retention

Introduction: For 2019 in the U.S. opioid overdose deaths neared 50,000 people. Increasing the number of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) programs available for the population is important to address this crisis (NIDA, n.d.).
Objective: To evaluate if MAT improves retention rates for those with opioid use disorder (OUD) for one Arizona organization’s (AZOrg) seven treatment facilities.
Methods: ASU IRB approval obtained, and de-identified data were abstracted from the electronic records of AZOrg, for a year, March 2020 to February 2021. The data included patient age, sex, date of admission, length of stay, substance abused, and if MAT (buprenorphine, naltrexone, Methadone) was prescribed. Intellectus statistical package was used for analysis.
Results: Among 3261 patients with a mean age of 35.81(18-82) years, 1528 (46.85%) were admitted for OUD that included 371 (24.28%) females, 686 of whom (44.9%) received MAT. For those treated with MAT mean length of stay was 35.78 (SD 30.34) days compared to a mean of 27.46 (30.79) days for those without MAT treatment. This finding was significant, for all forms of MAT, based on a two-tailed Two-Tailed Independent Samples t-Test test, p<.001.
Discussion/Conclusion: Increasing awareness about OUD and MAT is needed when providing care to patients with OUD. Providing organization-specific information regarding MAT benefits can enhance the adoption of this intervention and aid in the recovery of those being treated for OUD. This analysis did not include the possible confounding factors such as a history of incarceration, duration of OUD before admission, or structural differences of individual facilities.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-29