Matching Items (4)

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Research Skills, Perceptions and Attitudes of Incoming MBA Students

Description

Research on library-related perceptions and attitudes of MBA students is lacking, leading the authors of this article to survey a cohort of incoming MBA students at Arizona State University. The

Research on library-related perceptions and attitudes of MBA students is lacking, leading the authors of this article to survey a cohort of incoming MBA students at Arizona State University. The survey included self-evaluation of research skills, anticipated uses of library services and resources, and specific types of data/information the students thought would be most valuable during their studies. The survey uncovered differences based on how long the students had been away from higher education. The results are useful for business librarians and others working with graduate business students.

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  • 2020-07-30

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Entrepreneurship Initiatives in Academic Libraries

Description

Academic library spaces and services have widely broadened their missions away from providing only traditional research services and quiet spaces for study. Today, academic libraries are increasingly repurposing space and

Academic library spaces and services have widely broadened their missions away from providing only traditional research services and quiet spaces for study. Today, academic libraries are increasingly repurposing space and redesigning services to become the hub of innovation on university campuses. The literature explores entrepreneurship and academic libraries from many perspectives but with a common theme of the library as a leader in support for entrepreneurship initiatives on campus.

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  • 2020-05-29

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Building an Inclusive Library through Staff Accessibility Training

Description

Libraries provide a needed third place for students to engage with their peers and faculty, both academically and socially. Staff behavior, knowledge, and skills in providing an accessible and inclusive

Libraries provide a needed third place for students to engage with their peers and faculty, both academically and socially. Staff behavior, knowledge, and skills in providing an accessible and inclusive environment are key to helping students with disabilities feel that they belong in the libraries. This makes training in disability and accessibility awareness a necessary component of the overall program for the library. This study assessed a locally-developed, online training program for staff of all levels that was intended to improve staff knowledge and skills in disability etiquette, library services and spaces that support people with disabilities, and the policies that govern this work. The program used the four-part Deines-Jones (1999) model for its content and the core principles of andragogy for its instructional design. Assessment focused on changes in beliefs and knowledge using an adapted standardized scale, and evidence for learning from responses to training program questions, focus group discussions, and survey responses. Further development of the training program was informed by the principles of andragogy. Participants in the training program improved their scores in the knowledge domain but had no change in their beliefs domain. Learning was most evident in spaces where it engaged with previous knowledge and supportive customer service approaches. Participants identified and, in several cases, independently pursued new questions that were prompted by the training program. On the whole, participants found the training to be supportive and engaging, with minor changes to structure and focus recommended for the next iteration.

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Date Created
  • 2019

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The impact of subject indexes on semantic indeterminacy in enterprise document retrieval

Description

Ample evidence exists to support the conclusion that enterprise search is failing its users. This failure is costing corporate America billions of dollars every year. Most enterprise search engines are

Ample evidence exists to support the conclusion that enterprise search is failing its users. This failure is costing corporate America billions of dollars every year. Most enterprise search engines are built using web search engines as their foundations. These search engines are optimized for web use and are inadequate when used inside the firewall. Without the ability to use popularity-based measures for ranking documents returned to the searcher, these search engines must rely on full-text search technologies. The Information Science literature explains why full-text search, by itself, fails to adequately discriminate relevant from irrelevant documents. This failure in discrimination results in far too many documents being returned to the searcher, which causes enterprise searchers to abandon their searches in favor of re-creating the documents or information they seek. This dissertation describes and evaluates a potential solution to the problem of failed enterprise search derived from the Information Science literature: subject-aided search. In subject-aided search, full-text search is augmented with a search of subject metadata coded into each document based upon a hierarchically structured subject index. Using the Design Science methodology, this dissertation develops and evaluates three IT artifacts in the search for a solution to the wicked problem of enterprise search failure.

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Date Created
  • 2012