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In Vitro Display of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC)-Complexes on Luminex Platform Beads

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Our goal was to design a method to express soluble folded major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins using human cell line HeLa lysate with the novel 1-Step Human In Vitro Protein

Our goal was to design a method to express soluble folded major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins using human cell line HeLa lysate with the novel 1-Step Human In Vitro Protein Expression by Thermo Scientific in the presence of β2 microglobulin (β2m) and antigenic peptide.
We confirmed that the soluble protein MHC-A2.1 could be successfully attached to the Luminex magnetic beads and detected using the primary antibody anti-GST and the detection antibody goat mAb mouse PE. The average net MFI of the attached pA2.1-bead complex was 8182. Biotinylated A2.1 MHC complexes pre-folded with β2m and FLU M1 peptide (A2.1 monomers) were also successfully attached to Luminex magnetic beads and detected with BB7.2. The average net MFI of the detected A2.1 monmer-bead complexes was 318. The protein MHC complexes were multimerized on magnetic beads to create MHC tetramers and detected with BB7.2, PE labeled monoclonal antibody, via median fluorescent intensity with the Luminex platform. Varying protein, β2 microglobulin (β2m), and peptide concentrations were tested in a number of MHC-A2.1 protein refolding trials. Different antigenic peptides and attachment methods were also tested. However, none of the MHC-A2.1 protein folding and capture trials were successful. Although MHC-A2.1 complexes and recombinant MHC molecules could be attached to Luminex magnetic beads and be detected by Luminex arrays, soluble protein A2.1 could not be successfully expressed, refolded, captured onto Luminex beads, and detected. All refolding trials resulted in a net MFI of <25. The failed refolding and capture trials of A2.1 lead to the conclusion that human cell line HeLa lysate cannot be used to properly fold MHC molecules. However, efforts to refold the complexes onto Luminex magnetic beads are ongoing. We are also using the baculovirus expression system to refold soluble A2.1 lysate onto peptide-bead complexes.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

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The investigation and characterization of the group 3 [NiFe]-Hydrogenases using protein film electrochemistry

Description

Hydrogenases, the enzymes that reversibly convert protons and electrons to hydrogen, are used in all three domains of life. [NiFe]-hydrogenases are considered best suited for biotechnological applications because of their

Hydrogenases, the enzymes that reversibly convert protons and electrons to hydrogen, are used in all three domains of life. [NiFe]-hydrogenases are considered best suited for biotechnological applications because of their reversible inactivation with oxygen. Phylogenetically, there are four groups of [NiFe]-hydrogenases. The best characterized group, "uptake" hydrogenases, are membrane-bound and catalyze hydrogen oxidation in vivo. In contrast, the group 3 [NiFe]-hydrogenases are heteromultimeric, bifunctional enzymes that fulfill various cellular roles. In this dissertation, protein film electrochemistry (PFE) is used to characterize the catalytic properties of two group 3 [NiFe]-hydrogenases: HoxEFUYH from Synechocystsis sp. PCC 6803 and SHI from Pyrococcus furiosus. First, HoxEFUYH is shown to be biased towards hydrogen production. Upon exposure to oxygen, HoxEFUYH inactivates to two states, both of which can be reactivated on the timescale of seconds. Second, we show that PfSHI is the first example of an oxygen tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase that produces two inactive states upon exposure to oxygen. Both inactive states are analogous to those characterized for HoxEFUYH, but oxygen exposed PfSHI produces a greater fraction that reactivates at high potentials, enabling hydrogen oxidation in the presence of oxygen. Third, it is shown that removing the NAD(P)-reducing subunits from PfSHI leads to a decrease in bias towards hydrogen oxidation and renders the enzyme oxygen sensitive. Both traits are likely due to impaired intramolecular electron transfer. Mechanistic hypotheseses for these functional differences are considered.

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Date Created
  • 2012