Matching Items (4)

147839-Thumbnail Image.png

Cultural Competency in Health Care Delivery in the United States

Description

What is being done to promote cultural sensitivity in healthcare settings? To find answers and solutions to the widespread deficit of cultural competence in the health care industry, this case

What is being done to promote cultural sensitivity in healthcare settings? To find answers and solutions to the widespread deficit of cultural competence in the health care industry, this case study interviews a varied sample of five physicians consisting of three men and two women in clinical, academic, and administrative positions. The hypothesis was physicians do not receive cultural sensitivity training in medical school and as a result, they have to find other ways to learn about the cultures of their patients. None of the participants had received formal cultural competency training in medical school and all of them found methods to improve their cultural literacy. The study uncovered the cultural training physicians do receive is sporadic and inconsistent, which can cause some disconnect between education and real-life clinical practice. Many solutions to improve cultural competency in health care delivery are presented. The results of this exploratory research should be used to inspire future conversations about cultural competency in health care as well as the creation of support and educational services and materials to medical students and health care workers on improving cultural sensitivity in clinical practice.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

137278-Thumbnail Image.png

Global ethnotheories of climate change-related disease causation

Description

Understanding more about the similarities and differences in cultural perceptions of climate change-related disease causation can better inform culturally specific public health measures. Using interviews conducted with 685 adults in

Understanding more about the similarities and differences in cultural perceptions of climate change-related disease causation can better inform culturally specific public health measures. Using interviews conducted with 685 adults in eight diverse global locations ranging from Fiji and China to England and Phoenix, Arizona, this study explores climate change-disease beliefs within and across diverse cultures and comparisons between cultural and scientific models. A cultural consensus analysis was employed to identify a "culturally correct" model for each study site. Next, a scientific model was generated based on current scientific consensus regarding climate change- disease connections. Using the Quadratic Assignment Procedure (QAP), we determined the amount of correlation shared between the scientific model and each cultural model. The analysis revealed a high level of intercorrelation between the models of English speaking, economically developed sites such as Phoenix, Arizona. Additionally, cultural models from the non-English speaking sites were highly intercorrelated with one another. Overall, the English speaking sites tended to have more complex models with a greater density of causal links. Cultural models from the English speaking sites also demonstrated high levels of correlation with the scientific model. In comparison, the cultural models from the non-English speaking sites exhibited little correlation with the scientific model. Based on these findings, we suggest that cultural beliefs related to climate change-related disease causation may be influenced by complex local factors. For example, differences in education and media influences along with localized differences in climate change impacts may, in part, contribute to divergences between the cultural models.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

150938-Thumbnail Image.png

Beliefs and practices: a case study on oral corrective feedback in the teaching Chinese as a foreign language (TCFL) classroom

Description

This case study explores similarities and differences between the instructors' beliefs about oral corrective feedback and their actual practices in a summer Chinese program. This kind of feedback is beneficial

This case study explores similarities and differences between the instructors' beliefs about oral corrective feedback and their actual practices in a summer Chinese program. This kind of feedback is beneficial for beginning college-level learners of Chinese to improve their speaking accuracy. The researcher conducted face-to-face interviews with two teachers of Chinese, focusing on their beliefs about oral corrective feedback in their language classrooms. In addition, the researcher recorded teacher-student interactions through class observation in order to analyze the teachers' actual practices of oral corrective feedback. The main findings show that the teachers hold similar beliefs on oral corrective feedback and its beneficial role in helping improve learners speaking accuracy. The fact is that they frequently provide oral corrective feedback in classroom, mostly using recasts. Implications are discussed in view of the necessity of using explicit feedback and recasts appropriately. In addition, this study demonstrates the need for specific professional development and teacher training about how to provide efficient corrective feedback.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

150899-Thumbnail Image.png

Being bien educado in the United States: Mexican mother's childrearing beliefs and practices in the context of immigration

Description

This multiple case study examined Mexican mothers' beliefs on social and moral development in light of their adaptation to the United States. Super and Harkness' (1986, 2002) ecocultural framework and

This multiple case study examined Mexican mothers' beliefs on social and moral development in light of their adaptation to the United States. Super and Harkness' (1986, 2002) ecocultural framework and more specifically, the concept of the developmental niche, guided the analysis. Participants were five Mexican immigrant mothers living in the Phoenix metropolitan area with children between three and four years old. Using participant observation, mothers were shadowed during the day for a period of nine months and were interviewed four times. Additionally, a Q-sort activity on cultural values and a vignette activity were conducted. Evidence of continuity in the importance given to traditional beliefs such as being "bien educado" (proper demeanor) and showing "respeto" (respect) was found. However, the continuity on the teaching of cultural values was accompanied by changes in beliefs and practices. The traditional construct of a "chipil child" (a needy, whiny child) was connected to the idea that mothers somehow need to restrict how much affection, time and gifts they give to their children. This concern was in turn related to the higher access to consumption goods in the United States. It is argued that acculturation is lived differently by mothers, according to their educational attainment, use of expert advice and contact and knowledge with American mainstream culture.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012