Matching Items (5)

Digital Education Collaborative Thesis

Description

A deep dive on digital education solutions in the current and post-COVID education industry. Specific attention was given Interactive Flat Panel Display solutions in K-12 and higher education classrooms.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

137085-Thumbnail Image.png

Designing Digital Textbooks: Personalized and Collaborative Learning

Description

Digital technologies are quickly being combined with and replacing teacher curriculums and student resource tools. This is particularly true with advances in digital textbooks as it provides a medium for

Digital technologies are quickly being combined with and replacing teacher curriculums and student resource tools. This is particularly true with advances in digital textbooks as it provides a medium for opportunity and growth in the nature of the textbook as it pertains to students in the classroom. Although great strides have been taken in intelligent tutoring systems personalized toward a student's needs there seems to be an overall disconnect between student needs in the classroom in not utilizing or adopting these technologies. In this paper I provide both conflicting and comparable needs of teachers and students surrounding the textbook to reveal the costs and benefits associated with technology adoption. Through 4 teacher interviews and 4 participatory prototyping sessions I found that students and teachers desire the following elements in technology: 1) Collaboration 2) Synchronicity 3) Adaptive 4) Automation. I discuss the implications of implementing such features and how they could be applied in integrated Q&A system to encourage collaborative learning.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

157973-Thumbnail Image.png

Interpersonal Aspects of Musical Collaboration for Collaborative Pianists

Description

Collaborative piano education tends to discuss techniques of collaboration as primarily a musical skill. However, common understanding within the field regarding a collaborative pianist’s ability to work with others

Collaborative piano education tends to discuss techniques of collaboration as primarily a musical skill. However, common understanding within the field regarding a collaborative pianist’s ability to work with others offers another aspect to this assumption. It goes without saying that pianists’ interpersonal skills largely affect with whom they will work, and how efficaciously pianists and their partners will work together. Correspondingly, how pianists work with others can directly affect the success or failure of the musical collaboration.

The first intention of this paper is to explain why interpersonal skills are integral to the creation of quality musical outcomes and so-called musical togetherness; it specifies interpersonal aspects innate and unique to a pianist’s experience. Next, this paper defines two crucial components of collaboration – empathy and active listening – and discusses how pianists can build these skills into their personal practice and rehearsal. It continues with an examination of the interpersonal implications of studio arrangement, body language, and verbal language from a pianist’s perspective. This paper concludes with ideas for how to test for these skills during the collaborative piano audition process, a class syllabus showing how these skills can be incorporated into the collaborative piano curriculum, and suggestions for further research about interpersonal aspects of collaboration.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

149359-Thumbnail Image.png

The role of collaborative leadership in Arizona's subsidized child care stakeholder network

Description

This research project provides a unique perspective of the role of the concept of collaborative leadership between the Arizona Subsidized Child Care Program and its key stakeholder network. The process

This research project provides a unique perspective of the role of the concept of collaborative leadership between the Arizona Subsidized Child Care Program and its key stakeholder network. The process involved was to frame the research and its findings using the Team Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire's (TMLQ's) Assessment Scales. The research project sought to explore whether collaborative leadership in the policy-making process between the Arizona Subsidized Child Care Program and its key stakeholders actually does exist and, if so, to what extent. The research questions for the dissertation are, as follows: (1) What leadership styles does the Arizona Subsidized Child Care Program, through its various managers, exhibit and are these styles truly collaborative?; and (2) Are the leadership relationships between the key child care stakeholder groups and the Arizona Subsidized Child Care Program actually collaborative? The study employed a mixed-method approach (both quantitative and qualitative research methods) by means of an online survey, interviews, and document analysis. ii Based on this study's findings, the program exhibits collaborative leadership concepts with its stakeholder network. In addition, a positive correlation between the use of collaborative leadership concepts and participant perceptions of satisfaction, extra effort, and effectiveness was documented.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010

149633-Thumbnail Image.png

Effects of training in collaborative norms on the development of professional learning communities

Description

Abstract   Much has been researched and written concerning the structure, attributes, and benefits of the professional learning community (PLC), yet many have found that this highly collaborative model is

Abstract   Much has been researched and written concerning the structure, attributes, and benefits of the professional learning community (PLC), yet many have found that this highly collaborative model is difficult to implement. One reason for this was that conflict among team members often limited communication and therefore halted collaboration. In an attempt to overcome conflict, the researcher introduced an intervention to five grade-level teaching teams at a suburban elementary school where staff had been struggling to develop teams into PLCs. The intervention consisted of training participants in the use of collaborative norms, and then tracking the use of these norms during team meetings, as well as gathering the teachers' perceptions on how their team was being affected by the use of the norms. Seven training sessions were conducted, each devoted to an individual norm such as pausing, putting ideas on the table, or presuming the positive, and so on. A mixed-methods action research model was utilized in gathering and analyzing the data in this study. Qualitative measures included reflection journals completed by the teachers, open-ended survey questions, and written responses in which the teachers described prior to the intervention and again after the intervention how their team: 1. Is like a PLC, 2. Is not like a PLC, and 3. Is becoming like a PLC. Quantitative measures included a survey of team communication that used questions regarding efficacy, conflict, and candor/trust. Quantitative measures also included an instrument developed as part of the System for Multi-Level Observation of Groups (SYMLOG) which is used for recording evidences of values observed in team members. Results demonstrated increases in teachers' perceptions of friendliness among their colleagues, ability to deal with conflict amicably and constructively, and in teachers' perception that they were now being listened to and understood more than they had been previously. Teachers also reported that they came to think of their team as a PLC, and began to perceive that there were benefits with respect to student achievement because they were becoming a PLC. Discussion focused on lessons learned, implications for practice, and implications for research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011