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Arts Now! The Benefits of Arts Education Within Education as a Whole

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Crescendo, an after school program that was created to fulfill the Thesis/Creative Project requirement for Barrett, the Honors College, linked musical excellence with academic excellence in pursuit of social change for sixty of Tempe's underprivileged students in Thew Elementary School.

Crescendo, an after school program that was created to fulfill the Thesis/Creative Project requirement for Barrett, the Honors College, linked musical excellence with academic excellence in pursuit of social change for sixty of Tempe's underprivileged students in Thew Elementary School. This program focused on five main objectives: musical excellence through refined music education, academic excellence through tutorship, promotion of a positive self-image through community performances, development of strong communication skills through ensemble experience, and accessibility to students by providing the program free of cost. Students enrolled in this program were involved in musical rehearsal, college readiness sessions, a field trip to the Musical Instrument Museum, a music performance for the community, and academic assistance. Results of the overall effectiveness of the program were measured through a pre/post survey that was administered to the students and through dialogue with the teachers and parents of the participating students. The literary component of this project discusses the need for the integrations of outside arts organizations, like Crescendo, into schools, outlines the startup tasks of an arts education program (i.e. acquiring funding, designating volunteers, receiving permission, pinpointing a group of participants, etc.), offers before/after snapshot of the progress of the student participants, and provides a comparison to other programs of its type.

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2014-05

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Learning Without Representation: A Critique of Representational Thought in Philosophies of Arts Education and Curriculum

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In this study, I offer a critique of representational thought and the related concept of intentionality in the theory and practice of curriculum in arts education. I use the philosophies of Jacques Derrida and Gilles Deleuze alongside new materialist and

In this study, I offer a critique of representational thought and the related concept of intentionality in the theory and practice of curriculum in arts education. I use the philosophies of Jacques Derrida and Gilles Deleuze alongside new materialist and posthumanist theory to interrogate three figures of representational thought in arts education: the art object, the curriculum as enclosure, and the transmission-acquisition theory of learning. My analysis of these figures reveals how the theory and practice of curriculum in arts education uses privileged forms of interiority—the work of art, human subjectivity, and intentional consciousness—to pre-judge difference(s) according to recognizable subject-object determinations and established values. I argue that in the guise of representational thought, such determinations often (re)produce divisions and hierarchies of the human and nonhuman that, while making differences visible and knowable, also encloses them in fixed images. In arts education, such representational enclosures produce exclusionary boundaries for participation and learning which subordinate difference to identity, matter to form, and creativity to already-given determinations of subject and object in the mind of the intending human subject. I suggest that thinking about curriculum and learning in terms of inclosure rather than enclosure may allow arts educators to create living curricular forms that respond to and affirm differences rather contain them under representational identities.

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2021