Matching Items (6)

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Design of a Gravity-Fed Hydrodynamic Testing Tunnel

Description

The purpose of this project is to determine the feasibility of a water tunnel designed to meet certain constraints. The project goals are to tailor a design for a given location, and to produce a repeatable design sizing and shape

The purpose of this project is to determine the feasibility of a water tunnel designed to meet certain constraints. The project goals are to tailor a design for a given location, and to produce a repeatable design sizing and shape process for specified constraints. The primary design goals include a 1 m/s flow velocity in a 30cm x 30cm test section for 300 seconds. Secondary parameters, such as system height, tank height, area contraction ratio, and roof loading limits, may change depending on preference, location, or environment. The final chosen configuration is a gravity fed design with six major components: the reservoir tank, the initial duct, the contraction nozzle, the test section, the exit duct, and the variable control exit nozzle. Important sizing results include a minimum water weight of 60,000 pounds, a system height of 7.65 meters, a system length of 6 meters (not including the reservoir tank), a large shallow reservoir tank width of 12.2 meters, and height of 0.22 meters, and a control nozzle exit radius range of 5.25 cm to 5.3 cm. Computational fluid dynamic simulation further supports adherence to the design constraints but points out some potential areas for improvement in dealing with flow irregularities. These areas include the bends in the ducts, and the contraction nozzle. Despite those areas recommended for improvement, it is reasonable to conclude that the design and process fulfill the project goals.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-05

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Galaxy evolution with hybrid methods

Description

I combine, compare, and contrast the results from two different numerical techniques (grid vs. particle methods) studying multi-scale processes in galaxy and structure formation. I produce a method for recreating identical initial conditions for one method from those of the

I combine, compare, and contrast the results from two different numerical techniques (grid vs. particle methods) studying multi-scale processes in galaxy and structure formation. I produce a method for recreating identical initial conditions for one method from those of the other, and explore methodologies necessary for making these two methods as consistent as possible. With this, I first study the impact of streaming velocities of baryons with respect to dark matter, present at the epoch of reionization, on the ability for small halos to accrete gas at high redshift. With the inclusion of this stream velocity, I find the central density profile of halos is reduced, overall gas condensation is delayed, and infer a delay in the inevitable creation of stars.

I then combine the two numerical methods to study starburst outflows as they interact with satellite halos. This process leads to shocks catalyzing the formation of molecular coolants that lead to bursts in star formation, a process that is better captured in grid methods. The resultant clumps of stars are removed from their initial dark matter halo, resemble precursors to modern-day globular clusters, and their formation may be observable with upcoming telescopes.

Finally, I perform two simulation suites, comparing each numerical method's ability to model the impact of energetic feedback from accreting black holes at the core of giant clusters. With these comparisons I show that black hole feedback can maintain a hot diffuse medium while limiting the amount of gas that can condense into the interstellar medium, reducing the central star formation by up to an order of magnitude.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014

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A fast fluid simulator using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics

Description

This document presents a new implementation of the Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics algorithm using DirectX 11 and DirectCompute. The main goal of this document is to present to the reader an alternative solution to the largely studied and researched problem of

This document presents a new implementation of the Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics algorithm using DirectX 11 and DirectCompute. The main goal of this document is to present to the reader an alternative solution to the largely studied and researched problem of fluid simulation. Most other solutions have been implemented using the NVIDIA CUDA framework; however, the proposed solution in this document uses the Microsoft general-purpose computing on graphics processing units API. The implementation allows for the simulation of a large number of particles in a real-time scenario. The solution presented here uses the Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics algorithm to calculate the forces within the fluid; this algorithm provides a Lagrangian approach for discretizes the Navier-Stockes equations into a set of particles. Our solution uses the DirectCompute compute shaders to evaluate each particle using the multithreading and multi-core capabilities of the GPU increasing the overall performance. The solution then describes a method for extracting the fluid surface using the Marching Cubes method and the programmable interfaces exposed by the DirectX pipeline. Particularly, this document presents a method for using the Geometry Shader Stage to generate the triangle mesh as defined by the Marching Cubes method. The implementation results show the ability to simulate over 64K particles at a rate of 900 and 400 frames per second, not including the surface reconstruction steps and including the Marching Cubes steps respectively.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

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Effects of dynamic material strength on hydrodynamic instability and damage evolution in shock loaded copper

Description

Characterization and modeling of deformation and failure in metallic materials under extreme conditions, such as the high loads and strain rates found under shock loading due to explosive detonation and high velocity-impacts, are extremely important for a wide variety of

Characterization and modeling of deformation and failure in metallic materials under extreme conditions, such as the high loads and strain rates found under shock loading due to explosive detonation and high velocity-impacts, are extremely important for a wide variety of military and industrial applications. When a shock wave causes stress in a material that exceeds the elastic limit, plasticity and eventually spallation occur in the material. The process of spall fracture, which in ductile materials stems from strain localization, void nucleation, growth and coalescence, can be caused by microstructural heterogeneity. The analysis of void nucleation performed from a microstructurally explicit simulation of a spall damage evolution in a multicrystalline copper indicated triple junctions as the preferred sites for incipient damage nucleation revealing 75% of them with at least two grain boundaries with misorientation angle between 20-55°. The analysis suggested the nature of the boundaries connecting at a triple junction is an indicator of their tendency to localize spall damage. The results also showed that damage propagated preferentially into one of the high angle boundaries after voids nucleate at triple junctions. Recently the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) and the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) have been used to deduce dynamic material strength at very high pressures and strain rates. The RMI is used in this work since it allows using precise diagnostics such as Transient Imaging Displacement Interferometry (TIDI) due to its slower linear growth rate. The Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) model is used to study the effects of dynamic strength on the behavior of samples with a fed-thru RMI, induced via direct laser drive on a perturbed surface, on stability of the shock front and the dynamic evolution of the amplitudes and velocities of the perturbation imprinted on the back (flat) surface by the perturbed shock front. Simulation results clearly showed that the amplitude of the hydrodynamic instability increases with a decrease in strength and vice versa and that the amplitude of the perturbed shock front produced by the fed-thru RMI is also affected by strength in the same way, which provides an alternative to amplitude measurements to study strength effects under dynamic conditions. Simulation results also indicate the presence of second harmonics in the surface perturbation after a certain time, which were also affected by the material strength.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016

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Evolution, Disruption, and Composition of Galactic Outflows Around Starburst Galaxies

Description

The interaction between galaxies and the surrounding gas plays a key role in galaxy formation and evolution. Feedback processes driven by star formation and active galactic nuclei facilitate the exchange of mass and energy between the galaxy and the circumgalactic

The interaction between galaxies and the surrounding gas plays a key role in galaxy formation and evolution. Feedback processes driven by star formation and active galactic nuclei facilitate the exchange of mass and energy between the galaxy and the circumgalactic medium through inflowing and outflowing gas. These outflows have a significant impact on the star formation rate and metallicity of the galaxy. Observations of outflows have provided evidence that these outflows are multi-phase in nature, identifying both low energy ions such as Mg II and C III and high energy ions such as O VI. The underlying physics maintaining the two phases as well as the ionization mechanism for these phases remains unclear. In order to better understand galactic outflows, hydrodynamic simulations are used to study the evolution of wind-cloud interactions. In this work, I carried out a suite of magnetohydrodynamic simulations to characterize the influence of magnetic fields on the evolution and lifetime of cold clouds. I found magnetic fields either provided little improvement to cloud stability over other influences such as radiative cooling or accelerated cloud disruption by pushing cloud material in the direction orthogonal to the wind and magnetic fields. To investigate the ionization mechanism of the material within outflows I first considered estimating the column densities of various ions within wind-cloud simulations with the post-processing tool Trident. Under the assumption of ionization equilibrium, the simulations did not reproduce the observed absorption profiles demonstrating the need for a more detailed treatment of the ionization processes. I then performed a new set of simulations with the non-equilibrium chemistry solver, MAIHEM. The column densities produced in the non-equilibrium model alter the evolution of the cloud and highlight the increased ionization along the boundary of the cloud.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021

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Anomalous Chiral Plasmas in the Hydrodynamic Regime

Description

Chiral symmetry and its anomalous and spontaneous breaking play an important role

in particle physics, where it explains the origin of pion and hadron mass hierarchy

among other things.

Despite its microscopic origin chirality may also lead to observable effects

in

Chiral symmetry and its anomalous and spontaneous breaking play an important role

in particle physics, where it explains the origin of pion and hadron mass hierarchy

among other things.

Despite its microscopic origin chirality may also lead to observable effects

in macroscopic physical systems -- relativistic plasmas made of chiral

(spin-$\frac{1}{2}$) particles.

Such plasmas are called \textit{chiral}.

The effects include non-dissipative currents in external fields that could be present

even in quasi-equilibrium, such as the chiral magnetic (CME) and separation (CSE)

effects, as well as a number of inherently chiral collective modes

called the chiral magnetic (CMW) and vortical (CVW) waves.

Applications of chiral plasmas are truly interdisciplinary, ranging from

hot plasma filling the early Universe, to dense matter in neutron stars,

to electronic band structures in Dirac and Weyl semimetals, to quark-gluon plasma

produced in heavy-ion collisions.

The main focus of this dissertation is a search for traces of chiral physics

in the spectrum of collective modes in chiral plasmas.

I start from relativistic chiral kinetic theory and derive

first- and second-order chiral hydrodynamics.

Then I establish key features of an equilibrium state that describes many

physical chiral systems and use it to find the full spectrum of collective modes

in high-temperature and high-density cases.

Finally, I consider in detail the fate of the two inherently chiral waves, namely

the CMW and the CVW, and determine their detection prospects.

The main results of this dissertation are the formulation of a fully covariant

dissipative chiral hydrodynamics and the calculation of the spectrum of collective

modes in chiral plasmas.

It is found that the dissipative effects and dynamical electromagnetism play

an important role in most cases.

In particular, it is found that both the CMW and the CVW are heavily damped by the usual

Ohmic dissipation in charged plasmas and the diffusion effects in neutral plasmas.

These findings prompt a search for new physical observables in heavy-ion collisions,

as well as a revision of potential applications of chiral theories in

cosmology and solid-state physics.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019