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Learning to Draw lik a Child: How Age and Interest Affect Artistic Style

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This correlational study investigated how adolescent's artistic style changed depending on their level of interest in art. The participants were 28 students from the 7th and 8th grade of Zuni

This correlational study investigated how adolescent's artistic style changed depending on their level of interest in art. The participants were 28 students from the 7th and 8th grade of Zuni Hills Elementary School. A survey was administered which measured, in regards to their artwork, the categories of interest, experimentation in subject, experimentation in material, abstract style, literal style, imagination, identity, emotion and storytelling. It was predicted that interest would have a significant positive relationship with abstract style and experimentation with subject. It was also predicted that interest would have a significant negative relationship with literal style and experimentation with material. Scores for all categories were compared and significant positive relations were found in regards to emotion, identity and storytelling. There was also a significant positive realtionship between interest and imagination as well as interest and emotion. These findings add to research about motivation in adolescent art through the means of expression of the self.

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  • 2014-05

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Determining persistence of community college students in introductory geology classes

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Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) careers have been touted as critical to the success of our nation and also provide important opportunities for access and equity of underrepresented minorities

Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) careers have been touted as critical to the success of our nation and also provide important opportunities for access and equity of underrepresented minorities (URM's). Community colleges serve a diverse population and a large number of undergraduates currently enrolled in college, they are well situated to help address the increasing STEM workforce demands. Geoscience is a discipline that draws great interest, but has very low representation of URM's as majors. What factors influence a student's decision to major in the geosciences and are community college students different from research universities in what factors influence these decisions? Through a survey-design mixed with classroom observations, structural equation model was employed to predict a student's intent to persist in introductory geology based on student expectancy for success in their geology class, math self-concept, and interest in the content. A measure of classroom pedagogy was also used to determine if instructor played a role in predicting student intent to persist. The targeted population was introductory geology students participating in the Geoscience Affective Research NETwork (GARNET) project, a national sampling of students in enrolled in introductory geology courses. Results from SEM analysis indicated that interest was the primary predictor in a students intent to persist in the geosciences for both community college and research university students. In addition, self-efficacy appeared to be mediated by interest within these models. Classroom pedagogy impacted how much interest was needed to predict intent to persist, in which as classrooms became more student centered, less interest was required to predict intent to persist. Lastly, math self-concept did not predict student intent to persist in the geosciences, however, it did share variance with self-efficacy and control of learning beliefs, indicating it may play a moderating effect on student interest and self-efficacy. Implications of this work are that while community college students and research university students are different in demographics and content preparation, student-centered instruction continues to be the best way to support student's interest in the sciences. Future work includes examining how math self-concept may play a role in longitudinal persistence in the geosciences.

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  • 2014