Matching Items (34)

136888-Thumbnail Image.png

Codoping Zinc Oxide Nanowires

Description

The zinc oxide nanowires being grown are not developing properly and need to be fixed. In order to do this, the furnace equipment and experimental procedure must be tested until

The zinc oxide nanowires being grown are not developing properly and need to be fixed. In order to do this, the furnace equipment and experimental procedure must be tested until the results produced yield acceptable quality zinc oxide nanowires. After experimentation the nanowires were produced to an acceptable quality. With quality nanowires to experiment with, testing began to examine the effects of different thicknesses of aluminum dopants. Once doped and annealed, the wires were transferred to a substrate with a grid so contact points could be applied. However; the experiment was phased out once this step was half way complete due to the lab shifting to examine co-doping zinc oxide nanowires as explored in part two of this paper. The goal of co-doping zinc oxide film is to create an ideal p
type relationship for power generation, so this project focuses on altering the electrical properties of zinc oxide through doping that will allow more energy to be generated from the solar panels than current zinc oxide solar panels. The zinc oxide film doped with manganese was sputtered onto a silicon substrate. The experiment failed to create a co-doped sample because an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reading of the sample proved no nitrogen existed in the zinc oxide doped with manganese film. This experiment leads into this research teams work with co-doping, so instead of viewing this project as a failure it is seen as a learning experience. The research team is examining the results and creating new experiments to run to fix the problem. I currently work with my mentor Dr. Hongbin Yu and Seung Ho Ahn while doing research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

152030-Thumbnail Image.png

Study of interface adhesive properties of wurtzite materials for carbon fiber composites

Description

Recently, the use of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires as an interphase in composite materials has been demonstrated to increase the interfacial shear strength between carbon fiber and an epoxy matrix.

Recently, the use of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires as an interphase in composite materials has been demonstrated to increase the interfacial shear strength between carbon fiber and an epoxy matrix. In this research work, the strong adhesion between ZnO and carbon fiber is investigated to elucidate the interactions at the interface that result in high interfacial strength. First, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to calculate the adhesive energy between bare carbon and ZnO. Since the carbon fiber surface has oxygen functional groups, these were modeled and MD simulations showed the preference of ketones to strongly interact with ZnO, however, this was not observed in the case of hydroxyls and carboxylic acid. It was also found that the ketone molecules ability to change orientation facilitated the interactions with the ZnO surface. Experimentally, the atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to measure the adhesive energy between ZnO and carbon through a liftoff test by employing highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate and a ZnO covered AFM tip. Oxygen functionalization of the HOPG surface shows the increase of adhesive energy. Additionally, the surface of ZnO was modified to hold a negative charge, which demonstrated an increase in the adhesive energy. This increase in adhesion resulted from increased induction forces given the relatively high polarizability of HOPG and the preservation of the charge on ZnO surface. It was found that the additional negative charge can be preserved on the ZnO surface because there is an energy barrier since carbon and ZnO form a Schottky contact. Other materials with the same ionic properties of ZnO but with higher polarizability also demonstrated good adhesion to carbon. This result substantiates that their induced interaction can be facilitated not only by the polarizability of carbon but by any of the materials at the interface. The versatility to modify the magnitude of the induced interaction between carbon and an ionic material provides a new route to create interfaces with controlled interfacial strength.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

155877-Thumbnail Image.png

ZnTe nanostructural synthesis for electronic and optoelectronic devices

Description

Zinc telluride (ZnTe) is an attractive II-VI compound semiconductor with a direct

bandgap of 2.26 eV that is used in many applications in optoelectronic devices. Compared

to the two dimensional (2D) thin-film

Zinc telluride (ZnTe) is an attractive II-VI compound semiconductor with a direct

bandgap of 2.26 eV that is used in many applications in optoelectronic devices. Compared

to the two dimensional (2D) thin-film semiconductors, one-dimensional (1D)

nanowires can have different electronic properties for potential novel applications.

In this work, we present the study of ZnTe nanowires (NWs) that are synthesized

through a simple vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method. By controlling the presence or

the absence of Au catalysts and controlling the growth parameters such as growth

temperature, various growth morphologies of ZnTe, such as thin films and nanowires

can be obtained. The characterization of the ZnTe nanostructures and films was

performed using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

(EDX), high- resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), X-ray

diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL), Raman spectroscopy and light scattering

measurement. After confirming the crystal purity of ZnTe, two-terminal diodes and

three-terminal transistors were fabricated with both nanowire and planar nano-sheet

configurations, in order to correlate the nanostructure geometry to device performance

including field effect mobility, Schottky barrier characteristics, and turn-on

characteristics. Additionally, optoelectronic properties such as photoconductive gain

and responsivity were compared against morphology. Finally, ZnTe was explored in

conjunction with ZnO in order to form type-II band alignment in a core-shell nanostructure.

Various characterization techniques including scanning electron microscopy,

energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy , x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis

reflectance spectra and photoluminescence were used to investigate the modification

of ZnO/ZnTe core/shell structure properties. In PL spectra, the eliminated PL intensity

of ZnO wires is primarily attributed to the efficient charge transfer process

occurring between ZnO and ZnTe, due to the band alignment in the core/shell structure. Moreover, the result of UV-vis reflectance spectra corresponds to the band

gap energy of ZnO and ZnTe, respectively, which confirm that the sample consists of

ZnO/ZnTe core/shell structure of good quality.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

150213-Thumbnail Image.png

Optical and crystal structure characterizations of nanowires for infrared applications

Description

Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are one dimensional materials and have size quantization effect when the diameter is sufficiently small. They can serve as optical wave guides along the length direction and

Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are one dimensional materials and have size quantization effect when the diameter is sufficiently small. They can serve as optical wave guides along the length direction and contain optically active gain at the same time. Due to these unique properties, NWs are now very promising and extensively studied for nanoscale optoelectronic applications. A systematic and comprehensive optical and microstructural study of several important infrared semiconductor NWs is presented in this thesis, which includes InAs, PbS, InGaAs, erbium chloride silicate and erbium silicate. Micro-photoluminescence (PL) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized in conjunction to characterize the optical and microstructure of these wires. The focus of this thesis is on optical study of semiconductor NWs in the mid-infrared wavelengths. First, differently structured InAs NWs grown using various methods were characterized and compared. Three main PL peaks which are below, near and above InAs bandgap, respectively, were observed. The octadecylthiol self-assembled monolayer was employed to passivate the surface of InAs NWs to eliminate or reduce the effects of the surface states. The band-edge emission from wurtzite-structured NWs was completely recovered after passivatoin. The passivated NWs showed very good stability in air and under heat. In the second part, mid-infrared optical study was conducted on PbS wires of subwavelength diameter and lasing was demonstrated under optical pumping. The PbS wires were grown on Si substrate using chemical vapor deposition and have a rock-salt cubic structure. Single-mode lasing at the wavelength of ~3000-4000 nm was obtained from single as-grown PbS wire up to the temperature of 115 K. PL characterization was also utilized to demonstrate the highest crystallinity of the vertical arrays of InP and InGaAs/InP composition-graded heterostructure NWs made by a top-down fabrication method. TEM-related measurements were performed to study the crystal structures and elemental compositions of the Er-compound core-shell NWs. The core-shell NWs consist of an orthorhombic-structured erbium chloride silicate shell and a cubic-structured silicon core. These NWs provide unique Si-compatible materials with emission at 1530 nm for optical communications and solid state lasers.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

150852-Thumbnail Image.png

Growth and characterization of nanowires

Description

Nanowires (NWs) have attracted many interests due to their advance in synthesis and their unique structural, electrical and optical properties. NWs have been realized as promising candidates for future photonic

Nanowires (NWs) have attracted many interests due to their advance in synthesis and their unique structural, electrical and optical properties. NWs have been realized as promising candidates for future photonic platforms. In this work, erbium chloride silicate (ECS), CdS and CdSSe NWs growth by vapor-liquid-solid mechanism and their characterization were demonstrated. In the ECS NWs part, systematic experiments were performed to investigate the relation between growth temperature and NWs structure. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence characterization were used to study the NWs morphology, crystal quality and optical properties. At low growth temperature, there was strong Si Raman signal observed indicating ECS NWs have Si core. At high growth temperature, the excess Si signal was disappeared and the NWs showed better crystal quality and optical properties. The growth temperature is the key parameter that will induce the transition from Si/ECS core-shell NWs structure to solid ECS NWs. With the merits of high Er concentration and long PL lifetime, ECS NWs can serve as optical gain material with emission at 1.5 μm for communications and amplifiers. In the CdS, CdSSe NWs part, the band gap engineering of CdSSe NWs with spatial composition tuning along single NWs were demonstrated. The first step of realizing CdSSe NWs was the controlled growth of CdS NWs. It showed that overall pressure would largely affect the lengths of the CdS NWs. NWs with longer length can be obtained at higher pressure. Then, based on CdS NWs growth and by adding CdSe step by step, composition graded CdSSe alloy NWs were successfully synthesized. The temperature control over the source vapor concentration plays the key role for the growth.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

151337-Thumbnail Image.png

Path integral Monte Carlo simulations of quantum wires

Description

One dimensional (1D) and quasi-one dimensional quantum wires have been a subject of both theoretical and experimental interest since 1990s and before. Phenomena such as the "0.7 structure" in the

One dimensional (1D) and quasi-one dimensional quantum wires have been a subject of both theoretical and experimental interest since 1990s and before. Phenomena such as the "0.7 structure" in the conductance leave many open questions. In this dissertation, I study the properties and the internal electron states of semiconductor quantum wires with the path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) method. PIMC is a tool for simulating many-body quantum systems at finite temperature. Its ability to calculate thermodynamic properties and various correlation functions makes it an ideal tool in bridging experiments with theories. A general study of the features interpreted by the Luttinger liquid theory and observed in experiments is first presented, showing the need for new PIMC calculations in this field. I calculate the DC conductance at finite temperature for both noninteracting and interacting electrons. The quantized conductance is identified in PIMC simulations without making the same approximation in the Luttinger model. The low electron density regime is subject to strong interactions, since the kinetic energy decreases faster than the Coulomb interaction at low density. An electron state called the Wigner crystal has been proposed in this regime for quasi-1D wires. By using PIMC, I observe the zig-zag structure of the Wigner crystal. The quantum fluctuations suppress the long range correla- tions, making the order short-ranged. Spin correlations are calculated and used to evaluate the spin coupling strength in a zig-zag state. I also find that as the density increases, electrons undergo a structural phase transition to a dimer state, in which two electrons of opposite spins are coupled across the two rows of the zig-zag. A phase diagram is sketched for a range of densities and transverse confinements. The quantum point contact (QPC) is a typical realization of quantum wires. I study the QPC by explicitly simulating a system of electrons in and around a Timp potential (Timp, 1992). Localization of a single electron in the middle of the channel is observed at 5 K, as the split gate voltage increases. The DC conductance is calculated, which shows the effect of the Coulomb interaction. At 1 K and low electron density, a state similar to the Wigner crystal is found inside the channel.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

155184-Thumbnail Image.png

Growth and characterization of III-V phosphide nanowires

Description

Nanowires are 1D rod-like structures which are regarded as the basis for future technologies. III-V nanowires have attracted immense attention because of their stability, crystal quality and wide

Nanowires are 1D rod-like structures which are regarded as the basis for future technologies. III-V nanowires have attracted immense attention because of their stability, crystal quality and wide use. In this work, I focus on the growth and characterization of III-V semiconductor nanowires, in particular GaP, InP and InGaP alloys. These nanowires were grown using a hot wall CVD(Chemical Vapor Deposition) setup and are characterized using SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) and PL (Photoluminescence) techniques.

In the first chapter, Indium Phosphide nanowires were grown using elemental sources (In and P powders). I consider the various kinds of InP morphologies grown using this method. The effect of source temperature on the stoichiometry and optical properties of nanowires is studied. Lasing behavior has been seen in InP nanostructures, showing superior material quality of InP.

InGaP alloy nanowires were grown using compound and elemental sources. Nanowires grown using compound sources have significant oxide incorporation and showed kinky morphology. Nanowires grown using elemental sources had no oxide and showed better optical quality. Also, these samples showed a tunable alloy composition across the entire substrate covering more than 50% of the InGaP alloy system. Integrated intensity showed that the bandgap of the nanowires changed from indirect to direct bandgap with increasing Indium composition. InGaP alloy nanowires were compared with Gallium Phosphide nanowires in terms of PL emission, using InGaP nanowires it is possible to grow nanowires free of defects and oxygen impurities, which are commonly encountered in GaP nanowires.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

152850-Thumbnail Image.png

Growth of novel semiconducting nano and heterostructures

Description

This dissertation presents research findings on the three materials systems: lateral Si nanowires (SiNW), In2Se3/Bi2Se3 heterostructures and graphene. The first part of the thesis was focused on the growth and

This dissertation presents research findings on the three materials systems: lateral Si nanowires (SiNW), In2Se3/Bi2Se3 heterostructures and graphene. The first part of the thesis was focused on the growth and characterization of lateral SiNW. Lateral here refers to wires growing along the plane of substrate; vertical NW on the other hand grow out of the plane of substrate. It was found, using the Au-seeded vapor – liquid – solid technique, that epitaxial single-crystal SiNW can be grown laterally along Si(111) substrates that have been miscut toward [11− 2]. The ratio of lateral-to-vertical NW was found to increase as the miscut angle increased and as disilane pressure and substrate temperature decreased. Based on this observation, growth parameters were identified whereby all of the deposited Au seeds formed lateral NW. Furthermore, the nanofaceted substrate guided the growth via a mechanism that involved pinning of the trijunction at the liquid/solid interface of the growing nanowire.

Next, the growth of selenide heterostructures was explored. Specifically, molecular beam epitaxy was utilized to grow In2Se3 and Bi2Se3 films on h-BN, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and Si(111) substrates. Growth optimizations of In2Se3 and Bi2Se3 films were carried out by systematically varying the growth parameters. While the growth of these films was demonstrated on h-BN and HOPG surface, the majority of the effort was focused on growth on Si(111). Atomically flat terraces that extended laterally for several hundred nm, which were separated by single quintuple layer high steps characterized surface of the best In2Se3 films grown on Si(111). These In2Se3 films were suitable for subsequent high quality epitaxy of Bi2Se3 .

The last part of this dissertation was focused on a recently initiated and ongoing study of graphene growth on liquid metal surfaces. The initial part of the study comprised a successful modification of an existing growth system to accommodate graphene synthesis and process development for reproducible graphene growth. Graphene was grown on Cu, Au and AuCu alloys at varioua conditions. Preliminary results showed triangular features on the liquid part of the Cu metal surface. For Au, and AuCu alloys, hexagonal features were noticed both on the solid and liquid parts.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

153047-Thumbnail Image.png

Design and fabrication of monolithically-integrated laterally-arrayed multiple band gap solar cells using composition-graded alloy nanowires for spectrum-splitting photovoltaic systems

Description

This dissertation aims to demonstrate a new approach to fabricating solar cells for spectrum-splitting photovoltaic systems with the potential to reduce their cost and complexity of manufacturing, called Monolithically Integrated

This dissertation aims to demonstrate a new approach to fabricating solar cells for spectrum-splitting photovoltaic systems with the potential to reduce their cost and complexity of manufacturing, called Monolithically Integrated Laterally Arrayed Multiple Band gap (MILAMB) solar cells. Single crystal semiconductor alloy nanowire (NW) ensembles are grown with the alloy composition and band gap changing continuously across a broad range over the surface of a single substrate in a single, inexpensive growth step by the Dual-Gradient Method. The nanowire ensembles then serve as the absorbing materials in a set of solar cells for spectrum-splitting photovoltaic systems.

Preliminary design and simulation studies based on Anderson's model band line-ups were undertaken for CdPbS and InGaN alloys. Systems of six subcells obtained efficiencies in the 32-38% range for CdPbS and 34-40% for InGaN at 1-240 suns, though both materials systems require significant development before these results could be achieved experimentally. For an experimental demonstration, CdSSe was selected due to its availability. Proof-of-concept CdSSe nanowire ensemble solar cells with two subcells were fabricated simultaneously on one substrate. I-V characterization under 1 sun AM1.5G conditions yielded open-circuit voltages (Voc) up to 307 and 173 mV and short-circuit current densities (Jsc) up to 0.091 and 0.974 mA/cm2 for the CdS- and CdSe-rich cells, respectively. Similar thin film cells were also fabricated for comparison. The nanowire cells showed substantially higher Voc than the film cells, which was attributed to higher material quality in the CdSSe absorber. I-V measurements were also conducted with optical filters to simulate a simple form of spectrum-splitting. The CdS-rich cells showed uniformly higher Voc and fill factor (FF) than the CdSe-rich cells, as expected due to their larger band gaps. This suggested higher power density was produced by the CdS-rich cells on the single-nanowire level, which is the principal benefit of spectrum-splitting. These results constitute a proof-of-concept experimental demonstration of the MILAMB approach to fabricating multiple cells for spectrum-splitting photovoltaics. Future systems based on this approach could help to reduce the cost and complexity of manufacturing spectrum-splitting photovoltaic systems and offer a low cost alternative to multi-junction tandems for achieving high efficiencies.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

155449-Thumbnail Image.png

Electrospinning of ceramic solid electrolyte nanowires for lithium-ion batteries with enhanced ionic conductivity

Description

Solid electrolytes have great potential to address the safety issues of Li-ion batteries, but better synthesis methods are still required for ceramics electrolytes such as lithium lanthanum titanate (LLTO) and

Solid electrolytes have great potential to address the safety issues of Li-ion batteries, but better synthesis methods are still required for ceramics electrolytes such as lithium lanthanum titanate (LLTO) and lithium lanthanum zirconate (LLZO). Pellets made from ceramic nanopowders using conventional sintering can be porous due to the agglomeration of nanoparticles (NPs). Electrospinning is a simple and versatile technique for preparing oxide ceramic nanowires (NWs) and was used to prepare electrospun LLTO and LLZO NWs. Pellets prepared from the electrospun LLTO NWs had higher density, less void space, and higher Li+ conductivity compared to those comprised of LLTO prepared with conventional sol-gel methods, which demonstrated the potential that electrospinning can provide towards improving the properties of sol-gel derived ceramics. Cubic phase LLZO was stabilized at room temperature in the form of electrospun NWs without extrinsic dopants. Bulk LLZO with tetragonal structure was transformed to the cubic phase using particle size reduction via ball milling. Heating conditions that promoted particle coalescence and grain growth induced a transformation from the cubic to tetragonal phase in both types of nanostructured LLZO. Composite polymer solid electrolyte was fabricated using LLZO NWs as the filler and showed an improved ionic conductivity at room temperature. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies show that LLZO NWs partially modify the polymer matrix and create preferential pathways for Li+ conduction through the modified polymer regions. Doping did not have significant effect on improving the overall conductivity as the interfaces played a predominant role. By comparing fillers with different morphologies and intrinsic conductivities, it was found that both NW morphology and high intrinsic conductivity are desired.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017