Matching Items (5)

Computing Platform for Context Aware Smart Objects for Stroke Rehabilitation

Description

In order to regain functional use of affected limbs, stroke patients must undergo intense, repetitive, and sustained exercises. For this reason, it is a common occurrence for the recovery of

In order to regain functional use of affected limbs, stroke patients must undergo intense, repetitive, and sustained exercises. For this reason, it is a common occurrence for the recovery of stroke patients to suffer as a result of mental fatigue and boredom. For this reason, serious games aimed at reproducing the movements patients practice during rehabilitation sessions, present a promising solution to mitigating patient psychological exhaustion. This paper presents a system developed at the Center for Cognitive Ubiquitous Computing (CubiC) at Arizona State University which provides a platform for the development of serious games for stroke rehabilitation. The system consists of a network of nodes called Smart Cubes based on the Raspberry Pi (model B) computer which have an array of sensors and actuators as well as communication modules that are used in-game. The Smart Cubes are modular, taking advantage of the Raspberry Pi's General Purpose Input/Output header, and can be augmented with additional sensors or actuators in response to the desires of game developers and stroke rehabilitation therapists. Smart Cubes present advantages over traditional exercises such as having the capacity to provide many different forms of feedback and allowing for dynamically adapting games. Smart Cubes also present advantages over modern serious gaming platforms in the form of their modularity, flexibility resulting from their wireless network topology, and their independence of a monitor. Our contribution is a prototype of a Smart Cube network, a programmable computing platform, and a software framework specifically designed for the creation of serious games for stroke rehabilitation.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Upper body motion analysis using kinect for stroke rehabilitation at the home

Description

Motion capture using cost-effective sensing technology is challenging and the huge success of Microsoft Kinect has been attracting researchers to uncover the potential of using this technology into computer vision

Motion capture using cost-effective sensing technology is challenging and the huge success of Microsoft Kinect has been attracting researchers to uncover the potential of using this technology into computer vision applications. In this thesis, an upper-body motion analysis in a home-based system for stroke rehabilitation using novel RGB-D camera - Kinect is presented. We address this problem by first conducting a systematic analysis of the usability of Kinect for motion analysis in stroke rehabilitation. Then a hybrid upper body tracking approach is proposed which combines off-the-shelf skeleton tracking with a novel depth-fused mean shift tracking method. We proposed several kinematic features reliably extracted from the proposed inexpensive and portable motion capture system and classifiers that correlate torso movement to clinical measures of unimpaired and impaired. Experiment results show that the proposed sensing and analysis works reliably on measuring torso movement quality and is promising for end-point tracking. The system is currently being deployed for large-scale evaluations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Adaptive mixed reality rehabilitation for stroke

Description

Millions of Americans live with motor impairments resulting from a stroke and the best way to administer rehabilitative therapy to achieve recovery is not well understood. Adaptive mixed reality rehabilitation

Millions of Americans live with motor impairments resulting from a stroke and the best way to administer rehabilitative therapy to achieve recovery is not well understood. Adaptive mixed reality rehabilitation (AMRR) is a novel integration of motion capture technology and high-level media computing that provides precise kinematic measurements and engaging multimodal feedback for self-assessment during a therapeutic task. The AMRR system was evaluated in a small (N=3) cohort of stroke survivors to determine best practices for administering adaptive, media-based therapy. A proof of concept study followed, examining changes in clinical scale and kinematic performances among a group of stroke survivors who received either a month of AMRR therapy (N = 11) or matched dosing of traditional repetitive task therapy (N = 10). Both groups demonstrated statistically significant improvements in Wolf Motor Function Test and upper-extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment scores, indicating increased function after the therapy. However, only participants who received AMRR therapy showed a consistent improvement in their kinematic measurements, including those measured in the trained reaching task (reaching to grasp a cone) and in an untrained reaching task (reaching to push a lighted button). These results suggest that that the AMRR system can be used as a therapy tool to enhance both functionality and reaching kinematics that quantify movement quality. Additionally, the AMRR concepts are currently being transitioned to a home-based training application. An inexpensive, easy-to-use, toolkit of tangible objects has been developed to sense, assess and provide feedback on hand function during different functional activities. These objects have been shown to accurately and consistently track hand function in people with unimpaired movements and will be tested with stroke survivors in the future.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Comprehensive interactive neurorehabilitation system design and implementation through the application of interdisciplinary research and integrated design approaches

Description

Stroke is a leading cause of disability with varying effects across stroke survivors necessitating comprehensive approaches to rehabilitation. Interactive neurorehabilitation (INR) systems represent promising technological solutions that can provide an

Stroke is a leading cause of disability with varying effects across stroke survivors necessitating comprehensive approaches to rehabilitation. Interactive neurorehabilitation (INR) systems represent promising technological solutions that can provide an array of sensing, feedback and analysis tools which hold the potential to maximize clinical therapy as well as extend therapy to the home. Currently, there are a variety of approaches to INR design, which coupled with minimal large-scale clinical data, has led to a lack of cohesion in INR design. INR design presents an inherently complex space as these systems have multiple users including stroke survivors, therapists and designers, each with their own user experience needs. This dissertation proposes that comprehensive INR design, which can address this complex user space, requires and benefits from the application of interdisciplinary research that spans motor learning and interactive learning. A methodology for integrated and iterative design approaches to INR task experience, assessment, hardware, software and interactive training protocol design is proposed within the comprehensive example of design and implementation of a mixed reality rehabilitation system for minimally supervised environments. This system was tested with eight stroke survivors who showed promising results in both functional and movement quality improvement. The results of testing the system with stroke survivors as well as observing user experiences will be presented along with suggested improvements to the proposed design methodology. This integrative design methodology is proposed to have benefit for not only comprehensive INR design but also complex interactive system design in general.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Kinematic and dynamical analysis techniques for human movement analysis from portable sensing devices

Description

Today's world is seeing a rapid technological advancement in various fields, having access to faster computers and better sensing devices. With such advancements, the task of recognizing human activities has

Today's world is seeing a rapid technological advancement in various fields, having access to faster computers and better sensing devices. With such advancements, the task of recognizing human activities has been acknowledged as an important problem, with a wide range of applications such as surveillance, health monitoring and animation. Traditional approaches to dynamical modeling have included linear and nonlinear methods with their respective drawbacks. An alternative idea I propose is the use of descriptors of the shape of the dynamical attractor as a feature representation for quantification of nature of dynamics. The framework has two main advantages over traditional approaches: a) representation of the dynamical system is derived directly from the observational data, without any inherent assumptions, and b) the proposed features show stability under different time-series lengths where traditional dynamical invariants fail.

Approximately 1\% of the total world population are stroke survivors, making it the most common neurological disorder. This increasing demand for rehabilitation facilities has been seen as a significant healthcare problem worldwide. The laborious and expensive process of visual monitoring by physical therapists has motivated my research to invent novel strategies to supplement therapy received in hospital in a home-setting. In this direction, I propose a general framework for tuning component-level kinematic features using therapists’ overall impressions of movement quality, in the context of a Home-based Adaptive Mixed Reality Rehabilitation (HAMRR) system.

The rapid technological advancements in computing and sensing has resulted in large amounts of data which requires powerful tools to analyze. In the recent past, topological data analysis methods have been investigated in various communities, and the work by Carlsson establishes that persistent homology can be used as a powerful topological data analysis approach for effectively analyzing large datasets. I have explored suitable topological data analysis methods and propose a framework for human activity analysis utilizing the same for applications such as action recognition.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016