Matching Items (44)

Deus Ex Machina

Description

Deus Ex Machina was a group exhibition of works by honors candidate Kenosha Drucker and her Herberger institute colleagues Nicholas Gutierrez and Alyssa Burke. The show was a mixed media installation featuring video, printmaking, sculpture, painting, and drawing.

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  • 2014-05

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Counter-Landscapes: Performative Actions from the 1970s – Now

Description

Counter-Landscapes: Performative Actions from the 1970s – Now presents a group of artists working in both natural and urban environments whose work exploits the power of place to address issues

Counter-Landscapes: Performative Actions from the 1970s – Now presents a group of artists working in both natural and urban environments whose work exploits the power of place to address issues of social, environmental, and personal transformation. Through a focused selection of key works made between 1970 and 2019, which extend beyond traditional categories, Counter-Landscapes illuminates how the methodologies created by women artists in the 1970s and 1980s are employed by artists today, both men and women alike. Developing a practice of performative actions, these artists countered the culture that surrounded and oppressed them by embodying the live elements of performance art in order to push for social change. Looking back to the 1960s and the counter-culture mindset of the times, I approach the histories of land, performance, and conceptual art through feminist studies. Then I apply the same feminist approach to philosophical histories of landscape, place, and space. Through a discussion of an extensive range of works by 25 artists, this research seeks to demonstrate the indelible influence of feminist art practice on contemporary art. It brings the work of an innovative generation of women artists—Marina Abramović, Eleanor Antin, Agnes Denes, VALIE EXPORT, Rebecca Horn, Leslie Labowitz, Suzanne Lacy, Ana Mendieta, Adrian Piper, Lotty Rosenfeld, Bonnie Ora Sherk, Beth Ames Swartz, and Mierle Laderman Ukeles—together with more recent work by artists who have adopted and extended their methods. These artists, both male and female, include Allora  &  Calzadilla, Francis  Alÿs, Angela Ellsworth, Ana Teresa Fernández, Maria  Hupfield, Saskia  Jordá, Christian Philipp Müller, Pope.L,  Sarah Cameron Sunde, Zhou Tao, and Antonia Wright.

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  • 2020

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No one wants to be here and no one wants to leave

Description

Holidays. Anniversaries. Cocktail parties. In No One Wants to Be Here and No One Wants to Leave, loneliness surfaces in crowded rooms across America. Having gathered to mark special occasions,

Holidays. Anniversaries. Cocktail parties. In No One Wants to Be Here and No One Wants to Leave, loneliness surfaces in crowded rooms across America. Having gathered to mark special occasions, the people in these stories instead encounter moments where celebration and sadness intermingle.

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  • 2014

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The body snatcher's complaint

Description

Ranging in subject from a Tuareg festival outside Timbuktu to the 1975 "Battle of the Sexes" race at Belmont track to a Mississippi classroom in the Delta flood plains, the

Ranging in subject from a Tuareg festival outside Timbuktu to the 1975 "Battle of the Sexes" race at Belmont track to a Mississippi classroom in the Delta flood plains, the poems in The Body Snatcher's Complaint explore the blurring of self hood, a feeling of foreignness within one's own physical experience of the world, in the most intimate and global contexts.

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  • 2013

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Eight the hard way and other stories

Description

In this collection of stories, people find themselves face to face with great trouble: a house lost to flood, a brother lost to the river, a girl on the edge

In this collection of stories, people find themselves face to face with great trouble: a house lost to flood, a brother lost to the river, a girl on the edge of an adulthood she can't possibly survive. Set in Northern California along the banks of the Sacramento and American Rivers, the stories feature characters who live below the radar of the middle-class. Central to the narratives are notions of loss, lust, pleasure, and struggle.

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  • 2013

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I hate everyone but you

Description

I Hate Everyone But You bears witness to the quiet moments that force us to confront ourselves. In these stories, people in search of connection--to lovers, to family, to strangers--instead discover their own secrets: truths both haunting and empowering.

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  • 2015

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Cognize Normal-Like Pleez: Video Installation

Description

I believe the human mind is not an accurate reproducer of objects and events, but a tool that constructs their qualities. Philosophers Bowman Clarke, James John, and Amy Kind have

I believe the human mind is not an accurate reproducer of objects and events, but a tool that constructs their qualities. Philosophers Bowman Clarke, James John, and Amy Kind have argued for and against similar points, while Daniel Hoffman and Jay Dowling have debated cases from a psychological perspective. My understanding of their discourse surfaces in Cognize Normal-Like Pleez, a video installation designed to capture the enigmatic connection between perceivers and the things they perceive. The composition encapsulates this theme through a series of five videos that disseminate confusing imagery paired with mangled sounds. The miniatures operate in sequence on computer monitors set inside a haphazardously ornamented tower. Though the original sources for each video communicate clear, familiar subjects, the final product deliberately obscures them. Sometimes sounds and images flicker for only brief moments, perhaps too fast for the human mind to fully process. Though some information comes through, important data supplied by the surrounding context is absent.

I invite the audience to rationalize this complexing conglomerate and reflect on how their established biases inform their opinion of the work. Each person likely draws from his or her experiences, cultural conditioning, knowledge, and other personal factors in order to create an individual conceptualization of the installation. Their subjective conclusions reflect my belief concerning a neurological basis for the origin of qualities. One’s connection to Cognize’s images and sounds, to me, is not derived solely from characteristics inherent to it, but also endowed by one’s mind, which not only constructs the attributes one normally associates with the images and sounds (as opposed to the physics and biology that lead to their construction), but also seamlessly incorporates the aforementioned biases. I realize my ideas by focusing the topics of the videos and their setting around the transmission of information and its obfuscation. Just as one cannot see or hear past the perceptual barriers in Cognize, I believe one cannot escape his or her mind to “sense” qualities in an objective, disembodied manner, because the mind is necessary for perception.

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  • 2018

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No doors: a personal exploration of movement and technology

Description

No Doors: A Personal Exploration of Movement and Technology, details the interdisciplinary strategies that were used in the making of a series of interactive/reactive/immersive (IRI) installations that drew audiences into

No Doors: A Personal Exploration of Movement and Technology, details the interdisciplinary strategies that were used in the making of a series of interactive/reactive/immersive (IRI) installations that drew audiences into an experience and encouraged active observation and/or participation. The interdisciplinary IRI installations described in this document combined movement, sculpture, production design, and various forms of media and technology with environments in which participants had agency. In the process of developing this work, the artist considered several concepts and practices: site-specific, various technologies, real-time processing, participant experience, embodied exploration, and hidden activity. Throughout the creative process, the researcher conducted a series of four focus labs in which a small audience was invited to engage with the work as a way of gathering data about the effectiveness of the installations in facilitating active audience observation and/or participation. The data collected after each focus lab informed the revision of the work in preparation for the next focus lab, with the ultimate result being the production of a final exhibition of five interdisciplinary IRI installations. The installations detailed in this document were loosely based on five elements: water, fire, air, earth, and spirit.

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  • 2018

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Something about self: moving the creative flow within

Description

This thesis paper, Something about Self: Moving the Creative Flow Within, explores the progression of the author's abilities as a facilitator in a creative context through her project presentation SELF(ish):

This thesis paper, Something about Self: Moving the Creative Flow Within, explores the progression of the author's abilities as a facilitator in a creative context through her project presentation SELF(ish): grow(tru)thOUGHT. Along with the subjective assessment of creative facilitation, the underpinnings of the author's creative process and artistic vision are exposed through relevant literature, significant inspirations, personal insight, process comparisons, and imaginative metaphors. The author/artist offers a unique perspective on personal interests collected over the course of her graduate studies. Waugh expounds upon pertinent content such as intuition in creativity, the emotional link to the mind-body connection, dance movement therapy and its effects on states of being, self-realization and self-transcendence. Each of these contextual elements contributed to the creation of exercises for movement generation used in a performative dance work. Ultimately, this paper elucidates a transparent, versatile creative practice and the evolution of a unique, passionate artistry that is based on a balance between structure and flow.

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Date Created
  • 2012

A transcription of four viola works by York Bowen for clarinet and piano

Description

Works for clarinet in the twentieth century exist in abundance; furthermore, the number of extant works from the Classical period is substantial. However, works for solo clarinet in the late-Romantic

Works for clarinet in the twentieth century exist in abundance; furthermore, the number of extant works from the Classical period is substantial. However, works for solo clarinet in the late-Romantic style are lacking; most of the significant literature for clarinet is contained in orchestral works. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to add to the solo clarinet repertoire of the late Romantic-style through the transcription of works written originally for viola. The four works transcribed for this project are by York Bowen. Bowen was a British composer and pianist who taught at the Royal Academy of Music in England. Although his career flourished in the twentieth century, his music reflects the music of the late-Romantic style. The project includes a transcription of Bowen's Sonata No. 1 in C minor, Op. 18 for viola and piano, Sonata No. 2 in F major, Op. 22 for viola and piano, Romance in D-flat for viola and piano, and Phantasy in F, Op. 54 for viola and piano. Additionally, a brief examination of Bowen's life, an overview of each piece, details regarding transcription parts, a list of changes made to the original part, and a recording of each transcription is included in the document.

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Date Created
  • 2011