Matching Items (8)

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Integrating Social Skills Training in a Therapeutic Recreation Program for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Description

Research regarding social skills training techniques for youth with autism spectrum disorders does not generally include implementation in anywhere but clinical, highly structured settings. However, leisure and recreation settings are

Research regarding social skills training techniques for youth with autism spectrum disorders does not generally include implementation in anywhere but clinical, highly structured settings. However, leisure and recreation settings are conducive to promoting social skills improvement due to assets such as typical peer groups, engaging play activities, and significant opportunities for incidental learning. This program was designed for this particular population and integrated in to the daily schedule of a six-week long therapeutic recreation summer day camp for adolescents with disabilities ages 13-18. A standardized assessment, the Home and Community Social Behavior Scales (HCSBS) evaluates various areas of social ability and was utilized to measure changes specifically in peer interaction skills of participants with autism. Results discovered that this design can complement the aims of the camp and contribute to social enrichment and inclusion; every subject showed positive gains in the peer relations subscale at a much higher rate than in any other area of social ability. Multiple recognizable patterns emerged that can be evaluated in future studies, including greater average improvements for females, those ages 16-18 and those with an Asperger's diagnosis. Replication of this program could quantify and confirm the effectiveness of social skills training within recreation, which would require controlling for the additional treatment of a therapeutic summer camp. However, this observational case study demonstrates a promising future regarding improving the efficiency and value of therapeutic recreation services for adolescents with autism spectrum disorders.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Social Skills and Executive Functioning in Children with PCDH-19

Description

Social skill impairments and executive dysfunctions caused by epilepsy adversely affect the social, psychological, and cognitive wellbeing of children and their families.

Studies show that children with epilepsy are exposed

Social skill impairments and executive dysfunctions caused by epilepsy adversely affect the social, psychological, and cognitive wellbeing of children and their families.

Studies show that children with epilepsy are exposed to social, emotional, academic, personality, and behavioral problems when compared to healthy peers. This study focused on identifying the gaps between social skills and executive functioning among children with PCDH-19.

The researcher relied on the responses from the sampled population to create reliable findings, discussions, conclusions, and recommendations for this project. The study used quantitative design and self-report approach whereby the participants completed survey that was comprised of various rating scales. The study sample consisted of 25 participants. Results demonstrated a close correlation between social skills and executive functions among the children with PCDH-19 epilepsy. SSIS assessment indicated that children exhibited problems in social skills, academic competence, and behaviors. BRIEF-2 rating showed planning, attention, problem-solving, cognitive and emotional problems. The findings exhibited that the significant challenges encountered by girls with PCDH-19 include low levels of social competence which affect decision making in friendships, communicating, and interaction.

Keywords: social skills, executive functioning, PCDH-19, epilepsy, seizures, social assessment, cognitive measurement

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Communicating with compassion: the exploratory factor analysis and primary validation process of the Compassionate Communication Scale

Description

The purpose of this dissertation was to develop a Compassionate Communication Scale (CCS) by conducting a series of studies. The first study used qualitative data to identify and develop initial

The purpose of this dissertation was to develop a Compassionate Communication Scale (CCS) by conducting a series of studies. The first study used qualitative data to identify and develop initial scale items. A series of follow-up studies used exploratory factor analysis to investigate the underlying structure of the CCS. A three-factor structure emerged, which included: Compassionate conversation, such as listening, letting the distressed person disclose feelings, and making empathetic remarks; compassionate touch, such as holding someone's hand or patting someone's back; and compassionate messaging, such as posting an encouraging message on a social networking site or sending a sympathetic email. The next study tested convergent and divergent validity by determining how the three forms of compassionate communication associate with various traits. Compassionate conversation was positively related to compassion, empathetic concern, perspective taking, emotional intelligence, social expressivity, emotional expressivity and benevolence, and negatively related to verbal aggressiveness and narcissism. Compassionate touch was positively correlated with compassion, empathetic concern, perspective taking, emotional intelligence, social expressivity, emotional expressivity, and benevolence, and uncorrelated with verbal aggressiveness and benevolence. Finally, compassionate messaging was positively correlated with social expressivity, emotional expressivity, and uncorrelated with verbal aggressiveness and narcissism. The next study focused on cross-validation and criterion-related validity. Correlations showing that self-reports of a person's compassionate communication were positively related to a friend or romantic partner's report of that person's compassionate communication provided cross-validation. The test for criterion-related validity examined whether compassionate communication predicts relational satisfaction. Regression analyses revealed that people were more relationally satisfied when they perceived themselves to use compassionate conversation, when they perceived their partner to use compassionate conversation, and when their partner reported using compassionate conversation. This finding did not extend to compassionate touch or compassionate messaging. In fact, in one regression analysis, people reported more relational satisfaction when they perceived that their partners used high levels of compassionate conversation and low levels of compassionate touch. Overall, the analyses suggest that of the three forms of compassionate communication, compassionate conversation is most strongly related to relational satisfaction. Taken together, this series of studies provides initial evidence for the validity of the CCS.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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The relationship between placement and social skills in gifted students

Description

This study investigated the relationship between social emotional competency (SEC) and academic placement in gifted students. Data were collected on children between the ages of 5 and 12 years old

This study investigated the relationship between social emotional competency (SEC) and academic placement in gifted students. Data were collected on children between the ages of 5 and 12 years old (n=206) in three academic placement types - self-contained, cluster and content replacement. Social emotional skills were assessed by teacher report using the Devereux Student Strengths Assessment. Regardless of placements, the gifted students in this study were rated as having higher social emotional competencies than the standardization group of the DESSA. Gifted students in the cluster and self-contained settings demonstrated significantly higher scores in the area of Self-Awareness, which measures students' capacity to understand their personal strengths and weaknesses. When analyzed by gender, no significant differences were discovered between males; however, girls demonstrated significantly higher scores in the areas of Optimism and Self-Awareness in the self-contained and cluster settings. The results of the study have import for the development of gifted programs, especially for gifted girls.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Interpersonal skills of gifted students: risk versus resilience

Description

The population of intellectually gifted youth encompasses a wide range of abilities, talents, temperaments, and personality characteristics. Although generalizations are often made outside of the empirical literature regarding the interpersonal

The population of intellectually gifted youth encompasses a wide range of abilities, talents, temperaments, and personality characteristics. Although generalizations are often made outside of the empirical literature regarding the interpersonal skills of these children, much remains to be understood about their social behavior. The aim of this study was to examine the within-group differences of gifted children, and it was hypothesized that subgroups of the gifted population would differ from each other in terms of interpersonal skill development. Gifted education teachers within a large K-12 public school district in the Southwestern United States completed the Devereux Student Strengths Assessment (DESSA) regarding the social-emotional competence of 206 elementary and middle school students classified as gifted. Correlational analyses and factorial analysis of variance were conducted to compare interpersonal skills (as measured by DESSA ratings) and students' level of giftedness, area of identification as gifted, gender, and age. Results indicated that interpersonal skills were significantly related to gender, area of identification, and level of giftedness. Female children were described as having significantly higher levels of interpersonal skills overall, and children identified as gifted with both nonverbal and quantitative measures exhibited significantly higher levels of interpersonal skills than those identified with verbal or nonverbal measures alone. Significant correlations were also observed between the level of children's estimated gifted abilities and their interpersonal skills. Trends in the data suggested that as children's cognitive abilities increased, their interpersonal skills also increased, placing profoundly gifted children at social advantages over their moderately gifted peers. However, it was also noted that although the two variables were significantly related, they were not commensurate. While children presented with above-average cognitive abilities, their interpersonal skills were within the average range. This suggests that gifted children may benefit from interventions that target interpersonal skill development, in an effort to bring their social skills more in line with their cognitive abilities.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Measure to measure: additional lengths using educative music therapy to increase the math aptitude and social competency of the "forgotten middle

Description

Educators and therapists must unify and formulate new strategies to address the academic and social needs of a newly emerging at risk demographic, "the forgotten middle." Currently, a paradigm

Educators and therapists must unify and formulate new strategies to address the academic and social needs of a newly emerging at risk demographic, "the forgotten middle." Currently, a paradigm shift within educative music therapy, human development study, and educational psychology, suggests that curriculums need to integrate alternative methods into their framework, change the definition of at-risk, and recognize math aptitude and social competency as predictors of a student's ability to gain upward mobility and self-sufficiency. Musical interaction, although considered a secondary measure within educational forums, is a viable means to address the socio-emotional and academic needs of students. In order to substantiate the need for educators to integrate educative music therapy and social competency programs into standard curriculums, the researcher conducted a study using 23 students from a beginning high school guitar class and 4 students from a high school after-school program. These students participated in a ten-week study involving educative music therapy, social competency, and math aptitude. Participants completed the math fluency and math calculations sections of the Wechsler's Individual Achievement Test version 3, along with a questionnaire examining the participants' beliefs about the influence of music on math aptitude and social competency. Although the pre- and post-test results show no statistically significant difference between educative music therapy and math aptitude, the results from the questionnaires administered suggest that students perceive that social competency and musical interaction augment academic and social performance.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010

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Implementation of the Teamwork Skills Inventory among adolescents

Description

Individual and group accountability is an important part of productive group work. However, classroom evaluation of teamwork often relies on top-down assessment of group product by the teacher. Other methods

Individual and group accountability is an important part of productive group work. However, classroom evaluation of teamwork often relies on top-down assessment of group product by the teacher. Other methods include averaging group grades, group discussions, evaluative essays and random selection and application of one member's grade to the entire team. In contrast, the Teamwork Skills Inventory (TSI) developed by Strom and Strom provides assessment of individual conduct and contributions as observed by peers. The instrument also affords students with the opportunity to judge their own performance. Team members are responsible for their own behavior and skill development but are not held accountable for the actions taken by others. The TSI provides criteria for productive teamwork skills and behaviors. Students know in advance the criteria by which they and their teammates will judge each other's behavior skills. In turn, students have the opportunity to practice self-evaluation as they apply the same criteria to assess their own conduct. Self-evaluation compared with peer-evaluation provides support for confidence in behavioral strengths and can guide goal setting in areas where skills are weak and need adjustment. The TSI gives teachers an insider's view of group dynamics: the obstacles and benefits groups may encounter. Since team members have the vantage point of close interaction with peers they are more likely to know how individuals affect the thinking of others in a group. This frees teachers from the difficult task of judging group dynamics. TSI results can guide teachers in developing lessons that address the needs of individuals and groups. Data derived from the TSI can help schools provide for the needs of subgroups, such as special education and gifted classes. It can also help schools detect in-service needs for faculty and provide schools with a method of community accountability for use with cooperative learning methods and social skill achievement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010

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Social-emotional predictors of postsecondary enrollment for students with disabilities

Description

The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine which social-emotional skills may predict postsecondary enrollment for students with disabilities. Students with disabilities are less likely to enroll in any

The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine which social-emotional skills may predict postsecondary enrollment for students with disabilities. Students with disabilities are less likely to enroll in any form of postsecondary education and in turn experience poorer post-education outcomes than their general education peers. Using data from the second National Longitudinal Transition Study (NLTS2), a classification tree analysis was conducted on teacher-rated social-emotional behaviors in an attempt to determine which social-emotional skills were the strongest predictors of postsecondary enrollment. Items assessing social-emotional skills were selected from the second wave of teacher surveys based on their alignment with the broad taxonomy of social-emotional skills created by Caldarella and Merrell. The results of the classification tree analysis showed that one of the selected social-emotional items, teacher rated ability to follow directions, was the most significant predictor of postsecondary enrollment for students with disabilities. In general, the results suggest that compliance and, to a lesser extent, peer-relations skills, in addition to family income, predict postsecondary enrollment for students with high-incidence disabilities. This finding suggests that social-emotional skills play an important role in postsecondary enrollment for SWD, providing support for the use of social-emotional skills interventions in improving postsecondary enrollment rates and potentially post-educational outcomes for SWD.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011