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Observations and insights into the life and vocal work of Joseph Bologne (Chevalier de Saint-Georges)

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ABSTRACT

Chevalier de Saint-Georges, the brilliant swordsman, unequalled equestrian, athlete, dancer, violin virtuoso, composer and orchestral conductor is, and remains a singularly unique historical figure of the 18th century French Court of Louis XVI. Believed to be the first man of

ABSTRACT

Chevalier de Saint-Georges, the brilliant swordsman, unequalled equestrian, athlete, dancer, violin virtuoso, composer and orchestral conductor is, and remains a singularly unique historical figure of the 18th century French Court of Louis XVI. Believed to be the first man of mixed race to compose classical music, Saint-Georges, who was frequently invited to the court at Versailles to make music with Marie Antoinette not only thrived, but excelled during the height of an appalling slave trade and one of the most explosive periods in European history: the French Revolution. Saint-Georges’ ever evolving talent, and without preamble composed six operas. This research document will introduce to the reader important milestones that influenced the direction of his life, as well as a survey of two arias and duet from the opera L’Amant Anonyme using the paradigm of dance metrics as described in “Rhythmic Gesture in Mozart, Le Nozze di Figaro and Don Giovanni,” by Wye Jamison Allanbrook and “Classical Music, Expression, Form and Style” by Leonard Ratner.

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2016

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Make haste slowly: Jerold D. Ottley's tenure with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir

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Dr. Jerold D. Ottley's twenty-five years leading the Mormon Tabernacle Choir resulted in many distinguished awards and recognitions for the ensemble. Included among these are two Platinum and three Gold records from the Recording Industry Association of America, an Emmy

Dr. Jerold D. Ottley's twenty-five years leading the Mormon Tabernacle Choir resulted in many distinguished awards and recognitions for the ensemble. Included among these are two Platinum and three Gold records from the Recording Industry Association of America, an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, and two Freedom Foundation Awards for service to the country. He conducted the Choir at two presidential inaugurations, Ronald Reagan's in 1981 and George H. W. Bush's in 1989, as well as performances at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics Gala. He presided over eleven international tours to twenty-six countries and crisscrossed the United States for engagements in nearly every region of the country. Despite the awards, commendations, and increased recognition of the Choir, Ottley's greatest contributions were largely internal to the organization. Jerold Ottley is a skilled music educator, administrator, and emissary. Application of these proficiencies while at the helm of the Choir, led to what are, arguably, his three largest contributions: 1) as educator, he instituted in-service training for choir members, raising the level of their individual musicianship, thereby improving the technical level of the entire Choir; 2) as administrator, Ottley created policies and procedures that resulted in a more disciplined, refined ensemble; and 3) as emissary, he raised the ensemble's reputation among the general public and with music professionals. For the general public, he significantly broadened the Choir's repertoire and traveled frequently thereby reaching a wider audience. He secured greater respect among music professionals by inviting many of them to work directly with the Choir. The results were unparalleled. Ottley's twenty-five year tenure with the Choir is reflected in broader audiences, increased professional acceptance, added organizational discipline, and unprecedented musical proficiency. It is a notable legacy for a man who reportedly never felt comfortable as director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

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2011

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An overview of systematic composition with an introduction to the Take-Away System

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A systematic approach to composition has been used by a variety of composers to control an assortment of musical elements in their pieces. This paper begins with a brief survey of some of the important systematic approaches that composers have

A systematic approach to composition has been used by a variety of composers to control an assortment of musical elements in their pieces. This paper begins with a brief survey of some of the important systematic approaches that composers have employed in their compositions, devoting particular attention to Pierre Boulez's Structures Ia . The purpose of this survey is to examine several systematic approaches to composition by prominent composers and their philosophy in adopting this type of approach. The next section of the paper introduces my own systematic approach to composition: the Take-Away System. The third provides several musical applications of the system, citing my work, Octulus for two pianos, as an example. The appendix details theorems and observations within the system for further study.

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2011

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Redeemed from the Fall For Double Choir & Soloists with Violin, Bass Clarinet, Marimba & Organ

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Redeemed from the Fall is a cantata in five movements for double choir SSAATTBB with Soprano and Baritone soloists and violin, bass clarinet, marimba, and organ. The work’s approximate duration is 19 minutes. The text is derived from ancient and

Redeemed from the Fall is a cantata in five movements for double choir SSAATTBB with Soprano and Baritone soloists and violin, bass clarinet, marimba, and organ. The work’s approximate duration is 19 minutes. The text is derived from ancient and modern scriptures including the Bible, the Book of Mormon and the Book of Moses as contained in the Pearl of Great Price. The textual theme addresses the compelling narrative of the redemption of Adam and Eve after the Fall and expulsion from the Garden of Eden. The work begins with an instrumental overture, In Sorrow, inspired by the fallen state our first parents entered as consequence for partaking of the forbidden fruit. The second movement, The First Angel, is an aria for baritone accompanied by choir a cappella. It sets to music the words of an angel who appeared to Adam proclaiming that animal sacrifice is representative of the future atoning sacrifice of the Son of God. The central movement, The Baptism of Adam, is for soprano solo, choir (SSAA) and the ensemble. It depicts the miraculous events surrounding Adam’s acceptance of the gospel covenant, with the Holy Spirit baptizing Adam by immersion in water. The subsequent a cappella chorus, This Is the Plan of Salvation, further explores the truth that salvation for Adam and Eve and all their posterity was prepared through Christ from the beginning. The full chorus and ensemble perform the finale, Adam Fell, declaring that the very purpose of the Fall was that all humans could know the joy of redemption through Christ.

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2017