Matching Items (4)

Why We Bend, A Multimedia Art Exhibition

Description

‘why we bend' a Bachelor of Fine Arts honors thesis exhibition by Ximenna Hofsetz and Tiernan Warner brings together installation, digital, sculptural, and printed artwork. The main focus concerns

‘why we bend' a Bachelor of Fine Arts honors thesis exhibition by Ximenna Hofsetz and Tiernan Warner brings together installation, digital, sculptural, and printed artwork. The main focus concerns memory; and its vague, formless, and hazy nature. The work also examines what would happen if cognitive space could be physically mapped? What would it look like in sculptural form? Memory erodes and distorts with time. We influence our memories as much as they affect us. Thus, just as relationships are ever-changing, and our memories of those we interact with constantly shifting, our relationships with our own memories are malleable and evolve through time. This transient nature of memory is depicted in the various stylistic means of this exhibition by referencing time and space as well as personal memories and ephemera in both concrete and abstract ways. ‘why we bend’ implements a variety of multimedia techniques to examine recollection and its hold on us.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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How Was I to Know You Wouldn't Let Me Forget?

Description

How Was I to Know You Wouldn't Let Me Forget? is a art installation created by Christine Adams showcasing printmaking media, including lithography and etching. This installation was based on

How Was I to Know You Wouldn't Let Me Forget? is a art installation created by Christine Adams showcasing printmaking media, including lithography and etching. This installation was based on Adams' childhood bedroom and featured small bedroom shrines, a common motif throughout girlhood. The portraits of the people in the show are all individuals who Adams met between the ages of 13 and 21 and who have left her life, commenting on whether or not someone can ever really leave you.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

You Are Here. BFA Thesis Exhibition

Description

You Are Here is a mixed-media installation, featuring the thesis work of BFA: Intermedia senior, Carissa Kalia Heinrichs. The installation consists of a hanging fabric structure, in which gallery visitors

You Are Here is a mixed-media installation, featuring the thesis work of BFA: Intermedia senior, Carissa Kalia Heinrichs. The installation consists of a hanging fabric structure, in which gallery visitors may interact with by both circumambulating and entering the form, walking alongside ever transforming horizons. The exhibition addresses the re-contextualization of "here", challenging its containment, and inviting viewers to study diverse definitions of home encompassed in a single shared space. The exhibition will encompass the conceptual and technical growth fostered by the artist's academic career at both the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, as well as the Barrett Honors College at Arizona State University.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Helen Hyde and Her "Children": Influences, Techniques and Business Savvy of an American Japoniste Printmaker

Description

After the opening of Japan in the mid-1800s many foreigners flocked to the

nation. San Franciscan Helen Hyde (1868-1919) joined the throng in 1899. Unlike many

of her predecessors, however, she went

After the opening of Japan in the mid-1800s many foreigners flocked to the

nation. San Franciscan Helen Hyde (1868-1919) joined the throng in 1899. Unlike many

of her predecessors, however, she went as a single woman and was so taken with Japan

she made it her home over the span of fourteen years. While a number of cursory studies

have been written on Helen Hyde and her work, a wide range of questions have been left

unanswered. Issues regarding her specific training, her printmaking techniques and the

marketing of her art have been touched on, but never delved into. This dissertation will

explore those issues. Helen Hyde's success as a printmaker stemmed from her intense

artistic training, experimental techniques, artistic and social connections and diligence in

self-promotion and marketing as well as a Western audience hungry for "Old Japan," and

its imagined quaintness. Hyde's choice to live and work in Japan gave her access to

models and firsthand subject matter which helped her audience feel like they were getting

a slice of Japan, translated for them by a Western artist. This dissertation provides an in

depth bibliography including hundreds of primary newspaper articles about Hyde who

was lauded for her unique style. It also expands and corrects the listing of her printed

works and examines the working style of an American working in a Japanese system with

Japanese subjects for a primarily American audience. It also provides a listing of known

exhibitions of Hyde's works and a listing of stamps and markings she used on her prints.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016