Matching Items (6)

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Identifying Emerging Technologies and Techniques to Assess Indoor Environmental Quality and its Impact on Occupant Health and Well-Being

Description

The thesis, titled Identifying Emerging Technologies and Techniques to Assess Indoor Environmental Quality and its Impact on Occupant Health, consists of an in-depth literature review outlining the various impacts of

The thesis, titled Identifying Emerging Technologies and Techniques to Assess Indoor Environmental Quality and its Impact on Occupant Health, consists of an in-depth literature review outlining the various impacts of building factors on inhabitant health. Approximately 120 studies analyzing how environmental factors influence occupant health were reviewed and 25 were used to build this literature review. The thesis provides insight into the definitions of well-being, health, and the built environment and analyzes the relationship between the three. This complex relationship has been at the forefront of academic research in recent years, especially given the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Essentially, an individual’s health and well-being is encompassed by their physical, mental, and social state of being. Due to the increasing amount of time spent in indoor environments the built environment influences these measures of health and well-being through various environmental factors (Indoor Air Quality, humidity, temperature, lighting, acoustics, ergonomics) defining the overall Indoor Environmental Quality. This thesis reviewed the mentioned intervention and experimental studies conducted to determine how fluctuations in environmental factors influence reported health results of occupants in the short and long term. Questionnaires, interviews, medical tests, physical measurements, and sensors were used to track occupant health measures. Sensors are also used to record environmental factor levels and are now beginning to be incorporated into the building production process to promote occupant health in healthy and smart buildings. The goal is ultimately to develop these smart and healthy buildings using study results and advancing technologies and techniques as outlined in the thesis.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Assessing Neighborhood Walkability in South Phoenix

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As the prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States rises, opportunities for children to be physically active become more vital. One opportunity for physical activity involves children walking to

As the prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States rises, opportunities for children to be physically active become more vital. One opportunity for physical activity involves children walking to and from school. However, children that live in areas with a pedestrian-unfriendly built environment and a low degree of walkability are less likely to be physically active and more likely to be overweight. The purpose of this study was to study walking routes from schools in low-income neighborhoods in Southwestern United States to a local community center. Walking routes from the three study schools (South Mountain High School, Percy Julian Middle School, and Rose Linda Elementary School) were determined by distance, popularity, and the presence of a major thoroughfare. Segments and intersections, which formed the routes, were randomly selected from each school's buffer region. The walking routes as a whole, along with the segments and intersections, were audited and scored using built environment assessments tools: MAPS, PEQI and Walkability Checklist. These scores were utilized to develop interactive mapping tools to visualize the quality of the routes, segments and intersections and identify areas for improvement. Results showed that the routes from Percy Julian to the Kroc Center were, overall, rated higher than routes from the other two schools. The highest scoring route, from the seven routes studied, was route 2 from Percy Julian to the Kroc Center along Broadway Road. South Mountain High School was overall the worst starting point for walking to the Kroc Center as those three walking routes were graded as the least walkable. Possible areas for improvement include installing traffic calming features along major thoroughfares and reducing the perceived risk to pedestrian safety by beautifying the community by planting greenery. Future directions include studying the built environment in South Phoenix communities that surround the Kroc Center.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Reinventing the Design Process: Sustainability and Branding

Description

Explore the implications that both sustainability and branding have on the built environment in order to develop a health an wellness center that promotes a balanced lifestyle for two targets users, which are of entirely different demographics.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Obtaining LEED credits directed towards healthy inpatient block

Description

ABSTRACT Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) is a non-governmental organization of U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) which promotes a sustainable built environment with its rating systems. One of

ABSTRACT Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) is a non-governmental organization of U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) which promotes a sustainable built environment with its rating systems. One of the building segments which it considers is healthcare, where it is a challenge to identify the most cost-effective variety of complex equipments, to meet the demand for 24/7 health care and diagnosis, and implement various energy efficient strategies in inpatient hospitals. According to their “End Use Monitoring” study, Hospital Energy Alliances (HEA), an initiative of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), reducing plug load reduces hospital energy consumption. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the extent to which realistic changes to the building envelope, together with HVAC and operation schedules would allow LEED credits to be earned in the DOE–hospital prototype. The scope of this research is to specifically investigate the inpatient block where patient stays longer. However, to obtain LEED credits the percentage cost saving should be considered along with the end use monitoring. Several steps have been taken to identify the optimal set of the end use results by adopting the Whole Building Energy Simulation option of the LEED Energy & Atmosphere (EA) pre– requisite 2: Minimum Energy Performance. The initial step includes evaluating certain LEED criteria consistent with ASHRAE Standard 90.1–2007 with the constraint that hospital prototype is to be upgraded from Standard 2004 to Standard 2007. The simulation method stipulates energy conservation measures as well as utility costing to enhance the LEED credits. A series of simulations with different values of Light Power Density, Sizing Factors, Chiller Coefficient of Performance, Boiler Efficiency, Plug Loads and utility cost were run for a variety of end uses with the extreme climatic condition of Phoenix. These assessments are then compared and used as a framework for a proposed interactive design decision approach. As a result, a total of 19.4% energy savings and 20% utility cost savings were achieved by the building simulation tool, which refer to 5 and 7 LEED credits respectively. The study develops a proper framework for future evaluations intended to achieve more LEED points.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Understanding Student Perceptions of Arizona State University's Downtown Campus Built and Social Environments and their Perceived Impact on Student's Wellbeing

Description

The United Nations projects that 68% of the world population will live in urban areas by 2050. As urban areas continue to grow, it is critical to consider how cities

The United Nations projects that 68% of the world population will live in urban areas by 2050. As urban areas continue to grow, it is critical to consider how cities will be redesigned and reimagined to ensure that they are healthy and beneficial places that can properly support their residents. In addition, college students have been identified as a vulnerable population in regards to overall wellness. In Downtown Phoenix, one the biggest elements of concern will be the built environment and its influence on wellbeing as the city itself and Arizona State University’s Downtown campus populations continue to expand. Given this, the purpose of this study is two-fold. I applied Social-Cognitive Theory as a framework to first, understand student perceptions of the built and social environment and second, explore how perceptions of the built and social environment influence student wellbeing. I used semi-structured interviews and participant-driven photo elicitation to answer these questions. The study took place at Taylor Place Mall on Arizona State University’s Downtown Campus and participants were students who attend classes on the ASU Downtown Campus. Findings displayed the need for design considerations to focus on the safety of students, creating places to gather for social connection, and overall a desire for design to focus on place making and place meaning, as well as other themes. Understanding more clearly how the built and social environment guides behaviors and social opportunities can help urban designers, landscape architects, and community developers better plan healthier environments that foster productive behaviors, create meaningful spaces, and prove to be sustainable in future years.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Foundational analysis in initiative-based change management modeling an interdisciplinary study of organizational change in the built environment

Description

Within the vast area of study in Organizational Change lays the industrial application of Change Management, which includes the understanding of both resisters and facilitators to organizational change. This dissertation

Within the vast area of study in Organizational Change lays the industrial application of Change Management, which includes the understanding of both resisters and facilitators to organizational change. This dissertation presents an approach of gauging levels of change as it relates to both external and internal organization factors. The arena of such a test is given through the introduction of the same initiative change model, which attempts to improve transparency and accountability, across six different organizations where the varying results of change are measured. The change model itself consists of an interdisciplinary approach which emphasizes education of advanced organizational measurement techniques as fundamental drivers of converging change. The observations are documented in the real-time observed cased studies of six organizations as they progressed through the change process. This research also introduces a scaled metric for determining preliminary levels of change and endeavors to test both internal and external, or environmental, factors of change. A key contribution to the work is the analysis between both observed and surveyed data where a grounded theory analysis is used to help answer the question of what are factors of change in organizations. This work is considered to be foundational in real-time observational studies but has a promise for future additional contributions which would further elaborate on the phenomenon of prescribed organizational change.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012