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F2-isoprostanes and F2-isoprostane Metabolites: Biomarkers for Oxidative Stress and Therapeutic Efficacy

Description

F2-isoprostanes are a series of prostaglandin-like compounds derived from the free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation of arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is ubiquitously expressed in cell membranes. F2-isoprostanes are biomarkers of oxidative stress, an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants

F2-isoprostanes are a series of prostaglandin-like compounds derived from the free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation of arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is ubiquitously expressed in cell membranes. F2-isoprostanes are biomarkers of oxidative stress, an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants that can cause damage to DNA, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. Increased production of lipid peroxidation products have been implicated in the pathology of a number of conditions and diseases in humans. The objective of this thesis was to (1) optimize the LC/MS/MS F2-isoprostane method currently used in human samples for use in research animals and veterinary medicine, including the use of solid phase extraction, and (2) validate the optimized method in rodent and canine experimental studies. Our optimized method showed that Lyprinol treatment in dogs with osteoarthritis decreases F2-isoprostane levels nearly 2-fold. In addition, adjuvant alpha-tocopherol prevented tumor-induced increased F2-isoprostane levels. Finally, contrary to earlier studies using less specific ELISA F2-isoprostane methods, we demonstrate that unconditioned dogs benefit from low intensity exercise. Our data demonstrate successful optimization of the human LC/MS/MS F2-isoprostane method in rats and canines. Importantly, our results emphasize the need to use the more sensitive and specific LC/MS/MS method as compared to ELISA-based assays in order to distinguish the 15- and 5-series F2-isoprostanes, evidenced in particular by the two canine studies.

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Date Created
2015-05

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Effects of coconut oil supplementation on biomarkers of inflammation and lipid peroxidation

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ABSTRACT

Objective: The purpose of this randomized, placebo-controlled trial was to investigate the effect a daily coconut oil supplement (2 grams) would have on a common serum marker of systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein) and an indicator of oxidative stress (TBARS) when

ABSTRACT

Objective: The purpose of this randomized, placebo-controlled trial was to investigate the effect a daily coconut oil supplement (2 grams) would have on a common serum marker of systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein) and an indicator of oxidative stress (TBARS) when compared to the control group receiving a placebo capsule (white flour) in healthy, sedentary adults between the ages of 18-40 in Phoenix, Arizona.

Design: This study was designed as secondary analyses of blood samples originally collected to study the effects of coconut oil supplementation on blood lipids and body composition. The original study consisted of 32 healthy, adult volunteers recruited from the Arizona State University campus in Phoenix, Arizona. Participants followed no food restrictions or special diets, exercised less than 150 minutes per week, had no diagnoses of chronic disease, were not taking statin medications, were non-smokers, and no female participants were pregnant. Participants were randomized into either the Coconut Oil group (CO) or the Placebo group (PL) at week 0, and baseline blood samples and anthropometric measurements were obtained. Each participant completed an 8-week protocol consisting of two supplement capsules daily (coconut oil or placebo). Final fasting blood samples and anthropometric measurements were taken at week 8. This study analyzed the blood samples for measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and thiobarbituric reactive substance (TBARS).

Results: Eight weeks of 2 grams per day coconut oil supplementation, in comparison to placebo treatment, did not significantly reduce serum CRP ( -13% and +51% respectively, p=0.183) but did significantly increase TBARS ( +16% and -27% respectively, p=0.049).

Conclusions: Coconut oil supplementation (2 g/day) may impact lipid peroxidation as indicated by an increase in plasma TBARS concentration. Future trials are necessary to corroborate these results using other indices of fatty peroxide formation.

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Date Created
2017