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Des Knaben Wunderhorn: Arrangments for Horn and Marimba

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This project is a collection of four arrangements from Gustav Mahler’s Des Knaben Wunderhorn for French horn and marimba, with accompanying commentary. French horn and marimba is a beautiful combination

This project is a collection of four arrangements from Gustav Mahler’s Des Knaben Wunderhorn for French horn and marimba, with accompanying commentary. French horn and marimba is a beautiful combination that suffers from a lack of repertoire. These arrangements, composed by Kyle Nelson, are a step toward remedying that problem, while exploring the wide range of musical styles for which this combination is suited. The four songs that have been transcribed here are Urlicht, Wo die schönen Trompeten blasen, Der Tamboursg’sell, and Des Antonius von Padua Fischpredigt. Together, they provide a sampling of the many poems Mahler put to music in the late 1800’s for voice and piano. The sampling ranges from the very well-known (such as those featured in Mahler’s symphonies, like Urlicht) to one of the few lighthearted arrangements (Des Antonius von Padua Fischpredigt’s scherzo trio style) found in Mahler’s two original collections of lieder. The final product is performable as a duet with a talented horn and marimba duo, but in some circumstances it may be beneficial to divide the marimba part by stem direction and play as a trio on horn and two marimbas. The marimba part is best suited for four mallets on a 5-octave marimba.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Alec Wilder and the development of the Trio for horn, tuba and piano

Description

This project discusses the horn, tuba, piano sub-genre of brass chamber music. Alec Wilder wrote the first piece for this instrumentation in 1963 for his friends John Barrows and Harvey

This project discusses the horn, tuba, piano sub-genre of brass chamber music. Alec Wilder wrote the first piece for this instrumentation in 1963 for his friends John Barrows and Harvey Phillips. Wilder's compositional style was directly affected by life events and relationships. Through letters, biographies, recordings and autobiographies the importance of his friendship with Barrows and Phillips are displayed to show the links between the two men and the composer's compositional output. A deeper look into the life of Alec Wilder and a thematic analysis of his Suite No.1 for Horn, Tuba and Piano (1963), and Suite No.2 for Horn, Tuba and Piano (1971) shed light on the beginnings of the genre and provide a deeper understanding of the works. Since Wilder's two trios there have been at least twenty works written for this instrumentation. A brief overview of works written for the trio since 1971 provide a broad sense of the quantity and benefits of the trio in the hopes of inspiring new performances and compositions. This paper will combine the seemingly random compositions for the instrumentation into a collected repertoire. With an increase in exposure, the trio for horn, tuba and piano has the potential to become a standard brass chamber group that will benefit students, performers, and audiences alike.

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Date Created
  • 2015

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Telemann and Baroque hand horn technique

Description

In 1808, Heinrich Domnich (1767-1844) published his book, Méthode de Premier et de Second Cor, in which he credited the invention of hand horn to Dresden hornist Anton Joseph Hampel

In 1808, Heinrich Domnich (1767-1844) published his book, Méthode de Premier et de Second Cor, in which he credited the invention of hand horn to Dresden hornist Anton Joseph Hampel (1710-1771). The notion that Hampel was the first horn player to experiment and teach hand horn technique has persisted to the present day. This assumption disregards evidence found in Telemann's compositions and Baroque instrument design, where hand horn technique was clearly in use before Hampel.

This paper presents evidence that before Hampel, hand horn was in use and called for by composers. Because of the number of works for horn he generated before and during Hampel's life, Telemann's pieces provide powerful insight into the use of Baroque horn. Musical examples originate from passages in Telemann's works where the horn performs in a solo capacity and the music requires the performer to produce pitches outside the harmonic series. By necessity, the performer must use either the hand or bend the note with the embouchure in order to produce the correct pitch with the hand being the logical choice. The paper also examines published interviews from horn pedagogues, history books, method books from the classical and baroque eras, baroque and hand horn design, as well as articles written by some of the world's foremost baroque and hand horn experts.

By indentifying the number of non harmonic series tones in Telemann's music, combined with the opinions of hand horn experts, this paper suggests that horn players during the Baroque era must have known about, and used, hand horn technique. This knowledge will influence performer's interpretation of baroque pieces by providing a more historically informed performance, clearer understanding of intonation, the variety of tone colors expected, and create a better understanding of the development of the horn from foxhunting to the concert hall.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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An annotated guide to published horn warm-up routines, 1940-2015

Description

This project examines over 40 publications consisting of published warm-ups, routines, and materials suitable for daily routines. The books were all written specifically for the horn and published between

This project examines over 40 publications consisting of published warm-ups, routines, and materials suitable for daily routines. The books were all written specifically for the horn and published between 1940 and 2015. They are split into periods of twenty years each during this timeframe: 1940-1959, 1960-1979, 1980-1999, and 2000-2015. Included are brief annotations for each of the books which consist of general biographical information on the author, a summary of the material presented in each routine including a breakdown of how much each author covers a set of defined components, and suggestions for which type of student would be best to utilize each routine through an assessment of its strengths. Trends are also examined within each time period that attempt to demonstrate the larger evolution within the project over the course of the entire 75-year period.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Edouard Vuillermoz and Dix Pièces Mélodiques

Description

ABSTRACT

Edouard Vuillermoz (1869-1939) was a horn player and teacher who studied and later taught at the Paris Conservatory during the early twentieth century. As did many of the professors from

ABSTRACT

Edouard Vuillermoz (1869-1939) was a horn player and teacher who studied and later taught at the Paris Conservatory during the early twentieth century. As did many of the professors from the Conservatory, Vuillermoz published works for the horn. Unfortunately, his name has largely faded into obscurity and most of his works are no longer in print, yet one has remained in the repertoire and is still available for purchase today—Dix Pièces Mélodiques. Published in 1927 by Alphonse-Leduc, Vuillermoz desired for his students a set of etudes that would teach mastery of transposition, but he was not a composer. The ten transposition exercises he created were selected and transcribed from a compilation of vocalises commissioned by a vocal professor at the Conservatory, Amédée-Louis Hettich (1856-1937).

Hettich desired vocalise-etudes that would able aid and inspire his students, so he commissioned over one-hundred-fifty vocalises by modern composers during the first half of the twentieth century. Composers including Bozza, Copland, Dukas, Fauré, Messiaen, Nielsen, Ravel, and Tomasi answered his call for works between 1906 and 1938. These modern vocalise-etudes have since disappeared from the vocal repertoire. Now, a century later, many of these studies have entered the public domain and are resurfacing as instrumental transcriptions and concert etudes. This study promotes awareness of Edouard Vuillermoz’s Dix Pièces Mélodiques and advocates for their inclusion in a modern revival.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018