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Assisted Cycling Improves Cognitive and Motor Functioning in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

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This study examines cognitive and motor function in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS) following an 8-week assisted cycling therapy intervention. Forty-four participants were randomly assigned to three groups consisting of

This study examines cognitive and motor function in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS) following an 8-week assisted cycling therapy intervention. Forty-four participants were randomly assigned to three groups consisting of an assisted cycling (AC) (i.e., exercise accomplished through the use of a motor), a voluntary cycling (VC) (self-selected cadence), and a no cycling (NC) control group. Both ACT and VC groups rode a stationary bicycle for three 30-minute sessions a week, for a total of eight weeks. Participants completed cognitive testing that assessed information processing and manual dexterity at the beginning and at the end of the 8-week intervention. Consistent with our hypothesis, the results showed that information processing and manual dexterity improved following 8 weeks of cycling for the ACT group. These results were not seen for individuals in the voluntary and non-exercise groups. Our results suggest that assisted cycling therapy may induce permanent changes in the prefrontal cortex in adolescents with DS.

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  • 2015-05

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Finding the Best Fit to Maximize Responsiveness in Humanitarian Logistics: An Information Processing Perspective

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Within humanitarian logistics, there has been a growing trend of adopting information systems to enhance the responsiveness of aid delivery. By utilizing such technology, organizations are able to take advantage

Within humanitarian logistics, there has been a growing trend of adopting information systems to enhance the responsiveness of aid delivery. By utilizing such technology, organizations are able to take advantage of information sharing and its benefits, including improved coordination and reduced uncertainty. This paper seeks to explore this phenomenon using organizational information processing theory. Drawing from complexity literature, we argue that demand complexity should have a positive relationship with information sharing. Moreover, higher levels of information sharing should generate higher responsiveness. Lastly, we examine the effects of organizational structure on the relationship between information sharing and responsiveness. We posit that the degree of centralization will have a positive moderation effect on the aforementioned relationship. The paper then describes the methodology planned to test these hypotheses. We will design a case-based simulation that will incorporate current disaster situations and parameters experienced by Community Preparedness Exercise and Fair (COMPEF), which acts as a broker for the City of Tempe and various humanitarian groups. With the case-based simulation data, we will draw theoretical and managerial implications for the field of humanitarian logistics.

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  • 2013-05