Matching Items (4)

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F*** the Crust

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http://www.fthecrust.com/ Health is influenced by culture, ethnicity, age, gender, socioeconomic conditions, geography and many other factors. However, in an age of constant scientific evolution where new technologies and ways of determining health solutions are changing each day, finding proper

http://www.fthecrust.com/ Health is influenced by culture, ethnicity, age, gender, socioeconomic conditions, geography and many other factors. However, in an age of constant scientific evolution where new technologies and ways of determining health solutions are changing each day, finding proper ways to communicate these findings can be difficult. Change occurs when people are able to share common understanding. Being a part of a social group, being amused, relaxed and able to escape routine activities often allow people to learn and understand new concepts. Gluten is a popular new buzzword in the health industry that is not fully understood. Furthermore, gluten's presence in credible online resources is scarce. The objective of this thesis is to portray gluten in a way that is comprehensible and entertaining. Through web creation and site design, a credible online health resource, focusing on gluten, will be born. Research estimates 18 million Americans have gluten sensitivity. About 1 in every 133 Americans, about one percent of the population, has celiac disease. Around 83 percent of Americans with celiac disease are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed and a lack of resources would not seem to help that statistic. The population of people involved in gluten dietary restrictions is too high to not have ample resources. With social media's influence on the rise, more and more people are looking for advice from peers and experts online. Health is important and knowing how to take care of health with a click of a button is the gift of the modern world we live in.

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Date Created
2015-05

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Grains that Compensate for Nutrient Deficiencies in a Gluten-Free Diet

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The Gluten-Free Diet (GFD) is increasing in prevalence due to increased diagnoses of Celiac Disease, however deficiencies have been found to persist in individuals with Celiac Disease who have been on the diet for a prolonged period of time. These

The Gluten-Free Diet (GFD) is increasing in prevalence due to increased diagnoses of Celiac Disease, however deficiencies have been found to persist in individuals with Celiac Disease who have been on the diet for a prolonged period of time. These deficiencies are not the result of continued GI inability to absorb the nutrients (as evidenced by biopsy) and, therefore, are inherent to the diet itself. Comparing these deficiencies to nutrient-dense gluten-free grains reveals those that specifically meet the deficiencies evident in the GFD. These include low-fat soy flour, buckwheat, and sorghum as the most nutritionally adequate for the gluten-free individual.

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Date Created
2013-05

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Glycemic Response to Gluten-Free Bread in Healthy Adults

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Background: Research has found that nearly a quarter of the American population follows a gluten-free diet in some capacity, while only about 1% of the population is diagnosed with celiac disease. Although the amount of research-based evidence supporting any health

Background: Research has found that nearly a quarter of the American population follows a gluten-free diet in some capacity, while only about 1% of the population is diagnosed with celiac disease. Although the amount of research-based evidence supporting any health benefits of a gluten-free diet in an individual without a gluten- related disorder is limited, the number of people claiming to follow a gluten-free diet continues to rise. Also, despite an increasing belief that gluten is harmful for health, the potentially undesirable effects of gluten substitutions used in gluten-free foods are largely unknown. Due to the protein network encapsulating starch granules, gluten is thought to lengthen the amount of time needed during starch digestion, thereby reducing postprandial glycemia. Therefore, it is predicted that breads containing gluten will produce a lower glycemic response compared to gluten-free breads. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the glycemic response of gluten-free bread made with different types of flour compared to bread made with gluten-containing wheat flour. Methods: This study involved a 3-week, randomized, single blind crossover study in which 17 healthy individuals were asked to consume a different type of bread each week, 2 of which were gluten-free. Blood glucose was taken by finger prick at fasting as a baseline measurement, then for 2 hours after bread consumption in 30-minute increments. Results: Across the three groups, there was no significant difference in iAUC values after 120 minutes (p=0.192 ). The greatest mean was seen in the gluten-containing bread (145.3 ± 82.6), then the gluten-free bread made with rice flour (125.5 ± 62.8), and lastly the gluten-free bread made with potato and fava bean flour (112.4 ± 64.5). Conclusion: The inconsistent results of this study compared to previous, similar studies suggests that the postprandial glycemic response of gluten-free products can not be generalized as a whole, but instead is dependent on the type of product and the ingredients used to replace the gluten. Although the results did not show a significant difference, it does argue against the belief that gluten-free products are invariably better for health in the general, non-gluten sensitive population.

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Date Created
2019

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Effect of Diet Quality, FODMAP Consumption, and Gluten Consumption on Non–Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) Symptoms

Description

Despite widespread self-diagnosis of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) a variety of studies have shown that most patients with NCGS experience no symptoms from the consumption of gluten. Rather, many studies have shown that FODMAPs are the likely culprit of NCGS

Despite widespread self-diagnosis of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) a variety of studies have shown that most patients with NCGS experience no symptoms from the consumption of gluten. Rather, many studies have shown that FODMAPs are the likely culprit of NCGS symptoms. To further explore the causes of NCGS symptoms this study surveyed participants on their diet quality, FODMAP consumption, and gluten consumption while also determining NCGS symptom level using the GSRS-IBS survey and IBS-SSS survey. The results showed that diet quality was not correlated with IBS-SSS score or GSRS-IBS score. However, certain dietary components that negatively affected diet quality did correlate with NCGS symptom level. Similarly, FODMAP consumption was correlated with GSRS-IBS score while gluten consumption was correlated with both IBS-SSS and GSRS-IBS score. Overall, the results of this study suggest that limiting the consumption of FODMAPs, gluten, and foods that negatively contribute to diet quality can help reduce NCGS symptom level.

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Date Created
2022-05