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Intuitive Gesture Responses to Public Walk-Up-and-Use-Interactions

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Technological advances in the past decade alone are calling for modifications to the usability of various devices. Physical human interaction is becoming a popular method to communicate with user interfaces.

Technological advances in the past decade alone are calling for modifications to the usability of various devices. Physical human interaction is becoming a popular method to communicate with user interfaces. This ranges from touch-based devices such as an iPad or tablet to free space gesture systems such as the Microsoft Kinect. With the rise in popularity of these types of devices comes the increased amount of them in public areas. Public areas frequently use walk-up-and-use displays, which give many people the opportunity to interact with them. Walk-up-and-use displays are intended to be simple enough that any individual, regardless of experience using similar technology, will be able to successfully maneuver the system. While this should be easy enough for the people using it, it is a more complicated task for the designers who are in charge of creating an interface simple enough to use while also accomplishing the tasks it was built to complete. A serious issue that I'll be addressing in this thesis is how a system designer knows what gestures to program the interface to successfully respond to. Gesture elicitation is one widely used method to discover common, intuitive, gestures that can be used with public walk-up-and-use interactive displays. In this paper, I present a study to extract common intuitive gestures for various tasks, an analysis of the responses, and suggestions for future designs of interactive, public, walk-up-and use interactions.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Discoverable Free Space Gesture Sets for Walk-Up-and-Use Interactions

Description

Advances in technology are fueling a movement toward ubiquity for beyond-the-desktop systems. Novel interaction modalities, such as free space or full body gestures are becoming more common, as demonstrated by

Advances in technology are fueling a movement toward ubiquity for beyond-the-desktop systems. Novel interaction modalities, such as free space or full body gestures are becoming more common, as demonstrated by the rise of systems such as the Microsoft Kinect. However, much of the interaction design research for such systems is still focused on desktop and touch interactions. Current thinking in free-space gestures are limited in capability and imagination and most gesture studies have not attempted to identify gestures appropriate for public walk-up-and-use applications. A walk-up-and-use display must be discoverable, such that first-time users can use the system without any training, flexible, and not fatiguing, especially in the case of longer-term interactions. One mechanism for defining gesture sets for walk-up-and-use interactions is a participatory design method called gesture elicitation. This method has been used to identify several user-generated gesture sets and shown that user-generated sets are preferred by users over those defined by system designers. However, for these studies to be successfully implemented in walk-up-and-use applications, there is a need to understand which components of these gestures are semantically meaningful (i.e. do users distinguish been using their left and right hand, or are those semantically the same thing?). Thus, defining a standardized gesture vocabulary for coding, characterizing, and evaluating gestures is critical. This dissertation presents three gesture elicitation studies for walk-up-and-use displays that employ a novel gesture elicitation methodology, alongside a novel coding scheme for gesture elicitation data that focuses on features most important to users’ mental models. Generalizable design principles, based on the three studies, are then derived and presented (e.g. changes in speed are meaningful for scroll actions in walk up and use displays but not for paging or selection). The major contributions of this work are: (1) an elicitation methodology that aids users in overcoming biases from existing interaction modalities; (2) a better understanding of the gestural features that matter, e.g. that capture the intent of the gestures; and (3) generalizable design principles for walk-up-and-use public displays.

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Date Created
  • 2019