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Republican ideals influenced George Washington during his tenure as the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army and as president of the United States. These ideals included: virtue, reputation (which was the mark of a true 18th century gentleman), and encouraging individual citizens to perform their civic duties to safeguard their liberties.

Republican ideals influenced George Washington during his tenure as the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army and as president of the United States. These ideals included: virtue, reputation (which was the mark of a true 18th century gentleman), and encouraging individual citizens to perform their civic duties to safeguard their liberties. While there exist some instances where Washington had to put the good over the country over republicanism, it was done to further republicanism in the long run. Washington valued his reputation which compensated for his lack of a formal education. While not formally educated, Washington did receive more beneficial education by surveying the Ohio Country; an education which led him to his generalship and ultimately, the presidency.

Created2015-05
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The aim of this thesis is to explore the relationship between architecture and history in Virginia from 1607 to the eve of the American Revolution to create a complete historical narrative. The interdependency of history and architecture creates culturally important pieces and projects the colonist's need to connect to the

The aim of this thesis is to explore the relationship between architecture and history in Virginia from 1607 to the eve of the American Revolution to create a complete historical narrative. The interdependency of history and architecture creates culturally important pieces and projects the colonist's need to connect to the past as well as their innovations in their own cultural exploration. The thesis examines the living conditions of the colonists that formed Jamestown, and describes the architectural achievements and the historical events that were taking place at the time. After Jamestown, the paper moves on to the innovations of early Virginian architecture from Colonial architecture to Georgian architecture found in Williamsburg. Conclusively, the thesis presents a historical narrative on how architecture displays a collection of ideals from the Virginian colonists at the time. The external display of architecture parallels the events as well as the economic conditions of Virginia, creating a social dialogue between the gentry and the common class in the colony of Virginia.

ContributorsChang, Hosu (Author) / Gray, Susan (Thesis director) / O'Donnell, Catherine (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies (Contributor) / School of Social Transformation (Contributor)
Created2015-05