Matching Items (20)

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Smart Phone Camera Used to Determine Ion Concentration in Saliva Based on Fluorescence Level

Description

The use of saliva sampling as a noninvasive way for drug analysis as well as the monitoring systems within the body has become increasingly important in recent research. Because of the growing interest in saliva, this project proposes a way

The use of saliva sampling as a noninvasive way for drug analysis as well as the monitoring systems within the body has become increasingly important in recent research. Because of the growing interest in saliva, this project proposes a way to analyze sodium ion concentration in a saliva solution based on its fluorescence level when in the presence of a sodium indicator dye and recorded with a smartphone camera. The dyed sample was placed in a specially designed housing to exclude all ambient light from the images. A source light of known wavelength was used to excite the fluorescent dye and the smartphone camera images recorded the emission light wavelengths. After analysis of the images using ImageJ, it was possible to create a model to determine the level of fluorescence based on sodium ion concentration. The smartphone camera image model was compared to readings from a standard fluorescence plate recorder to test the accuracy of the model. The study found that the model was accurate within 5 % as compared to the fluorescence plate recorder. Based on the results, it was concluded that the method and resulting model proposed in this study is a valid was to analyze saliva or other solutions for their sodium ion concentration via images recorded by a smartphone camera.

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2014-05

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Photophysical Studies of the DNA Microenvironment and Small Molecule-DNA Interactions

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Photophysical Studies of the DNA Microenvironment and Small Molecule-DNA Interactions
The photophysical properties of ethidium in a variety of organic solvents, as well as several dsDNAs, were measured. We report that the fluorescence quantum yield of intercalated ethidium is

Photophysical Studies of the DNA Microenvironment and Small Molecule-DNA Interactions
The photophysical properties of ethidium in a variety of organic solvents, as well as several dsDNAs, were measured. We report that the fluorescence quantum yield of intercalated ethidium is .30(.03), which falls between previous stated measurements of .14 and .60. We believe this to be the most accurately measured fluorescence quantum yield to date, as verified by Strickler-Berg analyses, which exhibit excellent agreement with experimental fluorescence lifetimes. A marked hypochromism upon binding to DNA is noted due to interactions of the dye’s and nucleobases’ respective π-stacks. This more than counteracts the expected increase in transition dipole due to increased conjugation caused by twisting of the phenyl moiety upon intercalation.
The reduced volume cylinder model was tested by the quenching of the fluorescence of an intercalator (ethidium bromide) by a groove binder (methyl viologen). We report that the model is not accurate over a relevant range of DNA concentrations.

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2005-05

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A Novel Temperature-Sensitive MR & Fluorescence Imaging Contrast Agent

Description

Contrast agents in medical imaging can help visualize structural details, distributions of particular cell types, or local environment characteristics. Multi-modal imaging techniques have become increasingly popular for their improved sensitivity, resolution, and ability to correlate structural and functional information. This

Contrast agents in medical imaging can help visualize structural details, distributions of particular cell types, or local environment characteristics. Multi-modal imaging techniques have become increasingly popular for their improved sensitivity, resolution, and ability to correlate structural and functional information. This study addresses the development of dual-modality (magnetic resonance/fluorescence) and dual-functional (thermometry/detection) nanoprobes for enhanced tissue imaging.

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2015-05

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Combined AFM and Fluorescence Measurements for the Investigation of Nanophotonic Effects on Single Fluorophores

Description

In this project, we introduce a type of microscopy which produces correlated topography and fluorescence lifetime images with nanometer resolution. This technique combines atomic force microscopy (AFM) and time resolved confocal fluorescence microscopy to conduct biological and materials research. This

In this project, we introduce a type of microscopy which produces correlated topography and fluorescence lifetime images with nanometer resolution. This technique combines atomic force microscopy (AFM) and time resolved confocal fluorescence microscopy to conduct biological and materials research. This method is used to investigate nanophotonic effects on single fluorophores, including quantum dots and fluorescent molecules. For single fluorescent molecules, we investigate the effects of quenching of fluorescence with the probe of an atomic force microscope which is combined and synchronized with a confocal fluorescence lifetime microscope. For quantum dots, we investigate the correlation between the topographic and fluorescence data. With this method of combining an atomic force microscope with a confocal microscope, it is anticipated that there will be applications in nanomaterial characterization and life sciences; such as the determination of the structure of small molecular systems on surfaces, molecular interactions, as well as the structure and properties of fluorescent nanomaterials.

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Date Created
2013-05

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Evaluating and controlling glioblastoma infiltration

Description

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor with an incidence of approximately 11,000 Americans. Despite decades of research, average survival for GBM patients is a modest 15 months. Increasing the extent of GBM resection increases patient survival. However,

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor with an incidence of approximately 11,000 Americans. Despite decades of research, average survival for GBM patients is a modest 15 months. Increasing the extent of GBM resection increases patient survival. However, extending neurosurgical margins also threatens the removal of eloquent brain. For this reason, the infiltrative nature of GBM is an obstacle to its complete resection. We hypothesize that targeting genes and proteins that regulate GBM motility, and developing techniques that safely enhance extent of surgical resection, will improve GBM patient survival by decreasing infiltration into eloquent brain regions and enhancing tumor cytoreduction during surgery. Chapter 2 of this dissertation describes a gene and protein we identified; aquaporin-1 (aqp1) that enhances infiltration of GBM. In chapter 3, we describe a method for enhancing the diagnostic yield of GBM patient biopsies which will assist in identifying future molecular targets for GBM therapies. In chapter 4 we develop an intraoperative optical imaging technique that will assist identifying GBM and its infiltrative margins during surgical resection. The topic of this dissertation aims to target glioblastoma infiltration from molecular and cellular biology and neurosurgical disciplines. In the introduction we; 1. Provide a background of GBM and current therapies. 2. Discuss a protein we found that decreases GBM survival. 3. Describe an imaging modality we utilized for improving the quality of accrued patient GBM samples. 4. We provide an overview of intraoperative contrast agents available for neurosurgical resection of GBM, and discuss a new agent we studied for intraoperative visualization of GBM.

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Date Created
2014

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Development of mehanochemically active polymers for early damage detection

Description

Identification of early damage in polymer composite materials is of significant importance so that preventative measures can be taken before the materials reach catastrophic failure. Scientists have been developing damage detection technologies over many years and recently, mechanophore-based polymers, in

Identification of early damage in polymer composite materials is of significant importance so that preventative measures can be taken before the materials reach catastrophic failure. Scientists have been developing damage detection technologies over many years and recently, mechanophore-based polymers, in which mechanical energy is translated to activate a chemical transformation, have received increasing attention. More specifically, the damage can be made detectable by mechanochromic polymers, which provide a visible color change upon the scission of covalent bonds under stress. This dissertation focuses on the study of a novel self-sensing framework for identifying early and in-situ damage by employing unique stress-sensing mechanophores. Two types of mechanophores, cyclobutane and cyclooctane, were utilized, and the former formed from cinnamoyl moeities and the latter formed from anthracene upon photodimerization. The effects on the thermal and mechanical properties with the addition of the cyclobutane-based polymers into epoxy matrices were investigated. The emergence of cracks was detected by fluorescent signals at a strain level right after the yield point of the polymer blends, and the fluorescence intensified with the accumulation of strain. Similar to the mechanism of fluorescence emission from the cleavage of cyclobutane, the cyclooctane moiety generated fluorescent emission with a higher quantum yield upon cleavage. The experimental results also demonstrated the success of employing the cyclooctane type mechanophore as a potential force sensor, as the fluorescence intensification was correlated with the strain increase.

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2014

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Studying the solution behavior of DNA and DNA sliding clamps using various fluorescence techniques

Description

Solution conformations and dynamics of proteins and protein-DNA complexes are often difficult to predict from their crystal structures. The crystal structure only shows a snapshot of the different conformations these biological molecules can have in solution. Multiple different conformations can

Solution conformations and dynamics of proteins and protein-DNA complexes are often difficult to predict from their crystal structures. The crystal structure only shows a snapshot of the different conformations these biological molecules can have in solution. Multiple different conformations can exist in solution and potentially have more importance in the biological activity. DNA sliding clamps are a family of proteins with known crystal structures. These clamps encircle the DNA and enable other proteins to interact more efficiently with the DNA. Eukaryotic PCNA and prokaryotic β clamp are two of these clamps, some of the most stable homo-oligomers known. However, their solution stability and conformational equilibrium have not been investigated in depth before. Presented here are the studies involving two sliding clamps: yeast PCNA and bacterial β clamp. These studies show that the β clamp has a very different solution stability than PCNA. These conclusions were reached through various different fluorescence-based experiments, including fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), single molecule fluorescence, and various time resolved fluorescence techniques. Interpretations of these, and all other, fluorescence-based experiments are often affected by the properties of the fluorophores employed. Often the fluorescence properties of these fluorophores are influenced by their microenvironments. Fluorophores are known to sometimes interact with biological molecules, and this can have pronounced effects on the rotational mobility and photophysical properties of the dye. Misunderstanding the effect of these photophysical and rotational properties can lead to a misinterpretation of the obtained data. In this thesis, photophysical behaviors of various organic dyes were studied in the presence of deoxymononucleotides to examine more closely how interactions between fluorophores and DNA bases can affect fluorescent properties. Furthermore, the properties of cyanine dyes when bound to DNA and the effect of restricted rotation on FRET are presented in this thesis. This thesis involves studying fluorophore photophysics in various microenvironments and then expanding into the solution stability and dynamics of the DNA sliding clamps.

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Date Created
2013

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Surface enhanced fluorescence: a classic electromagnetic approach

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The fluorescence enhancement by a single Noble metal sphere is separated into excitation/absorption enhancement and the emission quantum yield enhancement. Incorporating the classical model of molecular spontaneous emission into the excitation/absorption transition, the excitation enhancement is calculated rigorously by electrodynamics

The fluorescence enhancement by a single Noble metal sphere is separated into excitation/absorption enhancement and the emission quantum yield enhancement. Incorporating the classical model of molecular spontaneous emission into the excitation/absorption transition, the excitation enhancement is calculated rigorously by electrodynamics in the frequency domain. The final formula for the excitation enhancement contains two parts: the primary field enhancement calculated from the Mie theory, and a derating factor due to the backscattering field from the molecule. When compared against a simplified model that only involves the primary Mie theory field calculation, this more rigorous model indicates that the excitation enhancement near the surface of the sphere is quenched severely due to the back-scattering field from the molecule. The degree of quenching depends in part on the bandwidth of the illumination because the presence of the sphere induces a red-shift in the absorption frequency of the molecule and at the same time broadens its spectrum. Monochromatic narrow band illumination at the molecule's original (unperturbed) resonant frequency yields large quenching. For the more realistic broadband illumination scenario, we calculate the final enhancement by integrating over the excitation/absorption spectrum. The numerical results indicate that the resonant illumination scenario overestimates the quenching and therefore would underestimate the total excitation enhancement if the illumination has a broader bandwidth than the molecule. Combining the excitation model with the exact Electrodynamical theory for emission, the complete realistic model demonstrates that there is a potential for significant fluorescence enhancement only for the case of a low quantum yield molecule close to the surface of the sphere. General expressions of the fluorescence enhancement for arbitrarily-shaped metal antennas are derived. The finite difference time domain method is utilized for analyzing these complicated antenna structures. We calculate the total excitation enhancement for the two-sphere dimer. Although the enhancement is greater in this case than for the single sphere, because of the derating effects the total enhancement can never reach the local field enhancement. In general, placing molecules very close to a plasmonic antenna surface yields poor enhancement because the local field is strongly affected by the molecular self-interaction with the metal antenna.

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Date Created
2013

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Nano- and micro-scale temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence thermometry

Description

A method of determining nanoparticle temperature through fluorescence intensity levels is described. Intracellular processes are often tracked through the use of fluorescence tagging, and ideal temperatures for many of these processes are unknown. Through the use of fluorescence-based thermometry, cellular

A method of determining nanoparticle temperature through fluorescence intensity levels is described. Intracellular processes are often tracked through the use of fluorescence tagging, and ideal temperatures for many of these processes are unknown. Through the use of fluorescence-based thermometry, cellular processes such as intracellular enzyme movement can be studied and their respective temperatures established simultaneously. Polystyrene and silica nanoparticles are synthesized with a variety of temperature-sensitive dyes such as BODIPY, rose Bengal, Rhodamine dyes 6G, 700, and 800, and Nile Blue A and Nile Red. Photographs are taken with a QImaging QM1 Questar EXi Retiga camera while particles are heated from 25 to 70 C and excited at 532 nm with a Coherent DPSS-532 laser. Photographs are converted to intensity images in MATLAB and analyzed for fluorescence intensity, and plots are generated in MATLAB to describe each dye's intensity vs temperature. Regression curves are created to describe change in fluorescence intensity over temperature. Dyes are compared as nanoparticle core material is varied. Large particles are also created to match the camera's optical resolution capabilities, and it is established that intensity values increase proportionally with nanoparticle size. Nile Red yielded the closest-fit model, with R2 values greater than 0.99 for a second-order polynomial fit. By contrast, Rhodamine 6G only yielded an R2 value of 0.88 for a third-order polynomial fit, making it the least reliable dye for temperature measurements using the polynomial model. Of particular interest in this work is Nile Blue A, whose fluorescence-temperature curve yielded a much different shape from the other dyes. It is recommended that future work describe a broader range of dyes and nanoparticle sizes, and use multiple excitation wavelengths to better quantify each dye's quantum efficiency. Further research into the effects of nanoparticle size on fluorescence intensity levels should be considered as the particles used here greatly exceed 2 ìm. In addition, Nile Blue A should be further investigated as to why its fluorescence-temperature curve did not take on a characteristic shape for a temperature-sensitive dye in these experiments.

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Date Created
2011

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Photo-chemical and microbial degradation of dissolved organic carbon in the Colorado River system

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The focus of this thesis is to study dissolved organic carbon composition and reactivity along the Colorado and Green Rivers. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in large-scale, managed rivers is relatively poorly studied as most literature has focused on pristine unmanaged

The focus of this thesis is to study dissolved organic carbon composition and reactivity along the Colorado and Green Rivers. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in large-scale, managed rivers is relatively poorly studied as most literature has focused on pristine unmanaged rivers. The Colorado River System is the 7th largest in the North America; there are seventeen large dams along the Colorado and Green River. DOC in rivers and in the lakes formed by dams (reservoirs) undergo photo-chemical and bio-degradation. DOC concentration and composition in these systems were investigated using bulk concentration, optical properties, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The riverine DOC concentration decreased from upstream to downstream but there was no change in the specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254). Total fluorescence also decreased along the river. In general, the fluorescence index (FI) increased slightly, the humification index (HIX) decreased, and the freshness index (β/α) increased from upstream to downstream. Photo-oxidation and biodegradation experiments were used to determine if the observed changes in DOC composition along the river could be driven by these biogeochemical alteration processes.

In two-week natural sunlight photo-oxidation experiments the DOC concentration did not change, while the SUVA254 and TF decreased. In addition, the FI and ‘freshness’ increased and HIX decreased during photo-oxidation. Photo-oxidation can explain the upstream to downstream trends for TF, FI, HIX, and freshness observed in river water. Serial photo-oxidation and biodegradation experiments were performed on water collected from three sites along the Colorado River. Bulk DOC concentration in all samples decreased during the biodegradation portion of the study, but DOC bioavailability was lower in samples that were photo-oxidized prior to the bioavailability study.

The upstream to downstream trends in DOC concentration and composition along the river can be explained by a combination of photo-chemical and microbial degradation. The bulk DOC concentration change is primarily driven by microbial degradation, while the changes in the composition of the fluorescent DOC are driven by photo-oxidation.

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Date Created
2015