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Making It Look Like a University Was Here: Arizona State University Architecture and Planning in the G. Homer Durham Decade, 1960-69

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Arizona State University experienced some of its most explosive growth in the 1960s—doubling its enrollment in just seven years, expanding many programs and adding a college of law, and significantly augmenting its physical plant. This work examines the architectural and

Arizona State University experienced some of its most explosive growth in the 1960s—doubling its enrollment in just seven years, expanding many programs and adding a college of law, and significantly augmenting its physical plant. This work examines the architectural and planning development of ASU in this decade and the surrounding years, coinciding with the presidency of Dr. G. Homer Durham, in various facets. Topics covered include the pedestrianization of the university campus, land acquisition and street realignment; the construction of newer and taller buildings to accommodate and expanded student population and educational program; and efforts to improve the university’s prestige through the use of modern architecture. ASU’s physical and human growth is compared to selected peer institutions. The legacy of the 1960s at ASU is also discussed within a historic preservation context.

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2016-05

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The attainment of a science degree by African American college students at Arizona State University: an investigation to identify the barriers and affordances

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Historically, African American students have been underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). If African American students continue to be underrepresented in STEM fields, they will not have access to valuable and high-paying sectors of the

Historically, African American students have been underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). If African American students continue to be underrepresented in STEM fields, they will not have access to valuable and high-paying sectors of the economy. Despite the number of African Americans in these fields being disproportionately low, there are still individuals that persist and complete science degrees. The aim of this study was to investigate African American students who excel in science at Arizona State University and examine the barriers and affordances that they encounter on their journey toward graduation. Qualitative research methods were used to address the research question of the study. My methodology included creating a case study to investigate the experiences of eight African American undergraduate college students at Arizona State University. These four male and four female students were excelling sophomores, juniors, or seniors who were majoring in a science field. Two of the males came from lower socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds, while two of the males were from higher SES backgrounds. The same applied to the four female participants. My research utilized surveys, semistructured interviews, and student observations to collect data that was analyzed and coded to determine common themes and elements that exist between the students. As a result of the data collection opportunities, peer support and financial support were identified as barriers, while, parental support, financial support, peer support, and teacher support were identified as affordances. In analyzing the data, the results indicated that for the student subjects in this study, sex and SES did not have any relationship with the barriers and affordances experienced.

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2012

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The Thomas G. Everett Collection: A Compendium of Selected Materials Donated by Bass Trombonist Thomas G. Everett

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This document is a compendium of the materials that are housed within the special collections donated by Thomas Everett. In August 2016, the Arizona State University School of Music, through the efforts of retired Professor of Trombone Douglas Yeo, received

This document is a compendium of the materials that are housed within the special collections donated by Thomas Everett. In August 2016, the Arizona State University School of Music, through the efforts of retired Professor of Trombone Douglas Yeo, received a donation of materials from Thomas Everett, founder of the International Trombone Association and retired director of bands at Harvard University.

This donation contains published and unpublished music, numerous letters, and various drafts of his book, An Annotated Guide to Bass Trombone Literature. Over the course of two-and-a-half years, the donation was catalogued for the university by the author. Materials from the donation were sent into public circulation or sent into special collections within the ASU School of Music Library.

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2019