Matching Items (8)

135833-Thumbnail Image.png

Outside Looking In: An Explanation to the Gendered Differences in Career Expectations

Description

The purpose of this research is to define significant explanatory factors behind gendered differences in career expectations. The data was collected through a survey that was administered to undergraduate and

The purpose of this research is to define significant explanatory factors behind gendered differences in career expectations. The data was collected through a survey that was administered to undergraduate and graduate students who are in the beginning stages of their career development. The questions in the survey focused on determining the expectations that college aged men and women have for their future careers on a subjective and objective basis. In addition, the questions were intended to determine gender differences in four explanatory factors including personality, core self-evaluations, work life values, and gender fatigue. Findings from the study coincide with previous research in that women indicated lower career expectations on a monetary and hierarchical basis in the short term and at the peak of their career. The difference in expectations were found to be significantly correlated with gender differences in extroversion levels, beta work values, and gender fatigue, all of which are internal influences that help to explain the current gap in career expectations, and thus the gap in men and women's eventual compensation and advancement. The findings from the study also help to show that different expectations are caused by differences in how people define success. Implications for these findings can be looked at from two different perspectives. For decades, feminist movements were the approach, and equality was the goal. Now that our society claims gender equality, we are at a standstill in progression, even though there are still clear gaps in compensation and leadership positions. This research can be helpful for not only universities advising future graduates, but also companies currently seeking future employees. Recommendations for future direction are based on the findings from the study and the responses of the individuals.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

147578-Thumbnail Image.png

An Examination of Communication Practices of Successful Entrepreneur Business Women in the Masculine Business/Corporate Environment

Description

As young women merge into the business world, the business environment structure often asks them to adjust or change their identity to be accepted by their male peers. Such identity

As young women merge into the business world, the business environment structure often asks them to adjust or change their identity to be accepted by their male peers. Such identity changes include adopting masculine forms of professional dress, building relationships in the workplace, and dealing with personal life. Through a qualitative research methodology, the study explores the communication practices that women engage in to succeed in the masculine business/corporate environment. Research indicates various types of limitations in masculine environments in connection with the flexibility of schedule, equal pay, and balance between professional and family life, leading to emotional and psychological impacts. Moreover, findings indicate the use of resistance tools to assist women in the corporate/business environment in leadership mentoring, education, and information found on apps and social media. I highlight practical implications, discuss limitations, and provide recommendations for future directions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

136574-Thumbnail Image.png

How Should I Sentence Her? It Depends on How Much She Is Worth to Me

Description

Previous studies exploring variability in sentencing decisions have consistently found gender differences, such that women receive lighter sentences than men. In the proposed study, I present a new framework for

Previous studies exploring variability in sentencing decisions have consistently found gender differences, such that women receive lighter sentences than men. In the proposed study, I present a new framework for understanding gender differences in sentencing preferences, including circumstances under which no gender differences should emerge. The Affordance Management Approach suggests that our minds are attuned to both group- and individual-level threats and opportunities that others afford us. I conceptualize the sentencing difference between men and women as driven by perceived affordances that assist or hinder an individual in achieving certain fundamental goals. When faced with sanctioning an offender in our community, the offender's sex, the victim's age, and environmental variables such as the ratio of men to women may influence our decision-making, because these factors have affordance implications. Thus, I hypothesized that individuals will express differences in the sentencing of offenders who commit assault, and that these differences vary by offender sex, victim age, and sex-ratio. The results indicate that, as predicted, female offenders received lighter sentencing than men when the offender committed an assault against a same-sex adult, but received equally punitive sentences as men when the assault was committed against a child. In general, results do not support a consistent effect of sex ratio as a factor when making sentencing decisions. Although results do not fully support the current study's specific hypotheses, there remains much to be gained from applying an affordance management perspective to understanding variability in sentencing between the sexes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

151920-Thumbnail Image.png

Interpersonal problem type, gender, and outcome in psychotherapy

Description

This study examined the relationship that gender in interaction with interpersonal problem type has with outcome in psychotherapy. A sample of 200 individuals, who sought psychotherapy at a counselor training

This study examined the relationship that gender in interaction with interpersonal problem type has with outcome in psychotherapy. A sample of 200 individuals, who sought psychotherapy at a counselor training facility, completed the Outcome Questionnaire-45(OQ-45) and the reduced version of the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-32). This study was aimed at examining whether gender (male and female), was related to treatment outcome, and whether this relationship was moderated by two interpersonal distress dimensions: dominance and affiliation. A hierarchical regression analyses was performed and indicated that gender did not predict psychotherapy treatment outcome, and neither dominance nor affiliation were moderators of the relationship between gender and outcome in psychotherapy.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

151706-Thumbnail Image.png

Gender differences in the links between alcohol-related consequences and perceived need for and utilization of treatment

Description

Past literature has indicated that the majority of people with alcohol problems never seek treatment and that this is especially true of women. Relatively few studies have investigated how different

Past literature has indicated that the majority of people with alcohol problems never seek treatment and that this is especially true of women. Relatively few studies have investigated how different types of alcohol-related consequences longitudinally predict men and women's perceived need for treatment and their utilization of treatment services. The current study sought to expand the literature by examining whether gender moderates the links between four frequently endorsed types of consequences and perceived need for or actual utilization of treatment. Two-hundred thirty-seven adults ages 21-36 completed a battery of questionnaires at two time points five years apart. Results indicated that there were four broad types of consequences endorsed by both men and women. Multiple-group models and Wald chi square tests indicated that there were no significant relationships between consequences and treatment outcomes. No gender moderation was found but post-hoc power analyses indicated that the study was underpowered to detect moderation. Researchers need to continue to study factors that predict utilization of alcohol treatment services and the process of recovery so that treatment providers can better address the needs of people with alcohol-related consequences in the areas of referral procedures, clinical assessment, and treatment service provision and planning.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

150469-Thumbnail Image.png

Classroom resiliency: a comparison of Navajo elementary students' perceptions of their classroom environment

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a gender difference in how students perceived their classroom environment on the Navajo Nation public school.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

149626-Thumbnail Image.png

Gender differences in children's disclosures and legal narratives of sexual abuse

Description

Legal narratives obtained from forensic interviews of twenty sexually abused children were analyzed concerning gender differences in disclosure patterns and narrative elaboration. Quantitative analysis of the children's disclosure of

Legal narratives obtained from forensic interviews of twenty sexually abused children were analyzed concerning gender differences in disclosure patterns and narrative elaboration. Quantitative analysis of the children's disclosure of sexual abuse revealed that boys made prompted disclosures to caretakers, primarily mothers. Girls more often made purposeful disclosures, and revealed the abuse to caretakers as well as other supportive individuals. Quantitative analysis of the children's forensic interviews revealed that girls provided more coherent, elaborate, structured, and contextually detailed narratives than boys did. Children's accounts of their disclosures were qualitatively analyzed. Results indicated that fear was the primary reason children delayed abuse disclosure. Qualitative analysis also found that the children's narratives revealed several common themes including themes of force and resistance. Implications for legal interventions on behalf of children and the effectiveness of abuse prevention programs were discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

150780-Thumbnail Image.png

Differences that make a difference: a study In collaborative learning

Description

Collaborative learning is a common teaching strategy in classrooms across age groups and content areas. It is important to measure and understand the cognitive process involved during collaboration to improve

Collaborative learning is a common teaching strategy in classrooms across age groups and content areas. It is important to measure and understand the cognitive process involved during collaboration to improve teaching methods involving interactive activities. This research attempted to answer the question: why do students learn more in collaborative settings? Using three measurement tools, 142 participants from seven different biology courses at a community college and at a university were tested before and after collaborating about the biological process of natural selection. Three factors were analyzed to measure their effect on learning at the individual level and the group level. The three factors were: difference in prior knowledge, sex and religious beliefs. Gender and religious beliefs both had a significant effect on post-test scores.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012