Matching Items (4)

Nationalism vs. Assimilation: First Generation Armenians in America

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The purpose of this work is to set up a dichotomy between trends of Nationalism and Assimilation, using the post Diaspora Armenian population as a sample. Armenian-American youth is the

The purpose of this work is to set up a dichotomy between trends of Nationalism and Assimilation, using the post Diaspora Armenian population as a sample. Armenian-American youth is the focus of study, as they are said to be in the unique position of having one foot in each door as far as cultures are concerned. The paper uses micro level survey data on young Armenians combined with macro level social trends in densely Armenian diaspora areas such as the San Fernando Valley, to find trends in recent rates of cultural integration. One of the major distinctions made is between the ‘traditional’ and the ‘symbolic’. The first is a more authentic grasp of one’s heritage, but is argued to be nearly impossible to maintain when moving to a dominant culture. The second is inheritable and teachable to children by rote, but only provides a shell of cultural artifacts. Dr. Bakalian summarizes the sentiment in the contrast of ‘being’ vs. ‘feeling’. Nationalism in moderation can contribute to maintaining ancestry and contribute to worldwide diversity. Nationalism in excess can lead to xenophobia and isolationism. Assimilation in moderation can allow for a certain group to learn and borrow the best parts from another nation. Assimilation in excess can breed resentment and the eventual loss or total symbolization of a once rich culture. In a country like the U.S. which assimilates through benign osmosis rather than oppression, it is difficult to make any conclusive recommendation which would teach something that arguably cannot be taught. Perhaps the best we can do is to push for teaching symbolic culture to inspire travel back to a ‘motherland’ to spark traditional values.

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  • 2016-05

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The Importance of Armenian Folklore Dance

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Armenia is a radiant and unique country, known primarily for its vast history, delicious food, and traditional folklore dance. Although Armenia was constantly ravaged by invading armies, the nation was

Armenia is a radiant and unique country, known primarily for its vast history, delicious food, and traditional folklore dance. Although Armenia was constantly ravaged by invading armies, the nation was strong enough to retain its own identity and culture. The rich dance heritage remained a living tradition into the 20th century, when the Turks tried to destroy the dance heritage and left fragments of the dances. Even though many of these fragments were lost due to urbanization, the dance techniques are still continuously studied by scholars and people all around the world.  For my creative project, I chose to perform an Armenian Folk Dance, as dance is an immense part of Armenian’s lives, and is an essential part of the Armenian cultural heritage. Dance is one of the primary ways by which one can observe and gain understanding of the Armenian people, their identity and culture. Dance is a way for Armenians to express themselves, as it is a form of art which combines elements of their rich culture, event-filled past, and their spiritual nature. The folklore dance has always sustained a leading role throughout Armenian history, as it runs through the blood of Armenians, being passed down from generation to generation. The Armenian people have survived and endured various historical challenges, but they have been able to preserve their unique dance elements and forms. To this day, Armenians continue to use dance to keep their culture and identity alive. It is a way to express freedom, and celebrate that even though we as a nation have faced many hardships, us Armenians have survived, and will always continue to survive with our faith, passion, determination, and strong will.

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  • 2015-05

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Piano quintet

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Piano Quintet> is a three movement piece, inspired by music of Eastern Europe. Sunrise in Hungary starts with a legato song in the first violin unfolding over slow moving sustained

Piano Quintet> is a three movement piece, inspired by music of Eastern Europe. Sunrise in Hungary starts with a legato song in the first violin unfolding over slow moving sustained harmonics in the rest of the strings. This is contrasted with a lively Hungarian dance which starts in the piano and jumps throughout all of the voices. Armenian Lament introduces a mournful melody performed over a subtly shifting pedal tone in the cello. The rest of the voices are slowly introduced until the movement builds into a canonic threnody. Evening in Bulgaria borrows from the vast repertoire of Bulgarian dances, including rhythms from the horo and rachenitsa. Each time that the movement returns to the primary theme, it incorporates aspects of the dance that directly preceded it. The final return is the crux of the piece, with the first violin playing a virtuosic ornaments run on the melody.

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  • 2014

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Womens autonomy and utilization of prenatal services in Armenia and Azerbaijan: analysis of demographic and health surveys 2005-2006

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Social determinants of health present significant barriers to utilization of maternal health services in transitional countries. This dissertation study examined associations between household autonomy and utilization of prenatal services among

Social determinants of health present significant barriers to utilization of maternal health services in transitional countries. This dissertation study examined associations between household autonomy and utilization of prenatal services among women of reproductive age in Armenia and Azerbaijan. Using nationally representative survey data, this study explored if household autonomy of women positively influenced the timing of the first prenatal visit, the number of prenatal care visits, and the content of care during visits. Results showed that household autonomy was positively associated with the timing of the first visit for prenatal care and the number of prenatal care visits. The content of care was negatively associated with the autonomy of women. Findings also pointed to an endogenous influence of a woman's position in the household structure. Additionally, this study analyzed associations between women's reproductive history and utilization, and economic disparities in utilization of prenatal care. The findings demonstrated that a history of complications during pregnancy and stillbirths were positively associated with utilization of prenatal care. Economic disparities in utilization of care were identified. Future interventions to increase utilization of maternal health services should account for traditional household structures in transitional countries. Women from poor families should receive support from social assistance and the health sector in accessing services pertaining to their health and well-being.

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  • 2015