Matching Items (12)

Low-Cost PIV Experimentation for Undergraduate Fluid Dynamics Courses

Description

Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has become a cornerstone of modern experimental fluid mechanics due to its unique ability to resolve the entire instantaneous two-dimensional velocity field of an experimental flow.

Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has become a cornerstone of modern experimental fluid mechanics due to its unique ability to resolve the entire instantaneous two-dimensional velocity field of an experimental flow. However, this methodology has historically been omitted from undergraduate curricula due to the significant cost of research-grade PIV systems and safety considerations stemming from the high-power Nd-YAG lasers typically implemented by PIV systems. In the following undergraduate thesis, a low-cost model of a PIV system is designed to be used within the context of an undergraduate fluid mechanics lab. The proposed system consists of a Hele-Shaw water tunnel, a high-power LED lighting source, and a modern smartphone camera. Additionally, a standalone application was developed to perform the necessary image processing as well as to perform Particle Streak Velocimetry (PSV) and PIV image analysis. Ultimately, the proposed system costs $229.33 and can replicate modern PIV techniques albeit for simple flow scenarios.

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  • 2021-05

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In Vitro and In Silico Study of Hemodynamics In Vascular Models: Validating Computational Fluid Dynamics for Medical Application

Description

This study investigates the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the medical field. An overview of recent advances in computational simulation and modeling in medical applications is provided, with

This study investigates the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the medical field. An overview of recent advances in computational simulation and modeling in medical applications is provided, with a particular emphasis on CFD. This study attempts to validate CFD and demonstrate the possibility for applying CFD to the clinical treatment and evaluation of atherosclerotic disease. Three different geometric configurations are investigated: one idealized bifurcation with a primary diameter of 8 mm, and two different patient-specific models of the bifurcation from the common femoral artery to the superficial and deep femoral arteries. CFD is compared against experimental measurements of steady state and pulsatile flow acquired with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Steady state and pulsatile flow rates that are consistent with those observed in the femoral artery are used. In addition, pulsatile CFD simulations are analyzed in order to demonstrate meaningful clinical applications for studying and evaluating the treatment of atherosclerotic disease. CFD was successfully validated for steady state flow, with an average percent error of 6.991%. Potential for validation was also demonstrated for pulsatile flow, but methodological errors warrant further investigation to reformulate methods and analyze results. Quantities frequently associated with atherosclerotic disease and arterial bifurcations, such as large variations in wall shear stress and the presence of recirculation zones are demonstrated from the pulsatile CFD simulations. Further study is required in order to evaluate whether or not such phenomena are represented by CFD accurately. Further study must also be performed in order to evaluate the practicality and utility of CFD for the evaluation of atherosclerotic disease treatment.

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  • 2016-05

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PIV ANALYSIS OF BASILAR TIP ANEURYSM HEMODYNAMICS, AND THE EFFECTS OF ENTERPRISE STENT TREATMENT

Description

Intracranial aneurysms, which form in the blood vessels of the brain, are particularly dangerous because of the importance and fragility of the human brain. When an intracranial aneurysm gets large

Intracranial aneurysms, which form in the blood vessels of the brain, are particularly dangerous because of the importance and fragility of the human brain. When an intracranial aneurysm gets large it poses a significant risk of bursting and causing subarachnoid hemorrhaging (SAH), a possibly fatal condition. One possible treatment involves placing a stent in the vessel to act as a flow diverter. In this study we look at the hemodynamics of two geometries of idealized basilar tip aneurysms, at 2,3, and 4 ml/s pulsatile flow, at three different points in the cardiac cycle. The smaller model had neck and dome diameters of 2.67 mm and 4 mm respectively, while the larger aneurysm had neck and dome diameters of 3 mm and 6 mm respectively. Both diameters and the dome to neck ratio increased in the second model, representing growth over time. Flow was analyzed using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) for both geometries in untreated models, as well as after treatment with a high porosity Enterprise stent (Codman and Shurtleff Inc.). Flow in the models was characterized by root mean square velocity in the aneurysm and neck plane, cross neck flow, max aneurysm vorticity, and total aneurysm kinetic energy. It was found that in the smaller aneurysm model (model 1), Enterprise stent treatment reduced all flow parameters substantially. The smallest reduction was in max vorticity, at 42.48%, and the largest in total kinetic energy, at 75.69%. In the larger model (model 2) there was a 52.18% reduction in cross neck flow, but a 167.28% increase in aneurysm vorticity. The other three parameters experienced little change. These results, along with observed velocity vector fields, indicate a noticeable diversion of flow away from the aneurysm in the stent treated model 1. Treatment in model 2 had a small flow diversion effect, but also altered flow in unpredictable ways, in some cases having a detrimental effect on aneurysm hemodynamics. The results of this study indicate that Enterprise stent treatment is only effective in small, relatively undeveloped aneurysm geometries, and waiting until an aneurysm has grown too large can eliminate this treatment option altogether.

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  • 2013-05

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Characterization of the effects of cerebral aneurysm geometry on hemodynamics and endovascular treatment outcomes

Description

Cerebral aneurysms are pathological balloonings of blood vessels in the brain, commonly found in the arterial network at the base of the brain. Cerebral aneurysm rupture can lead to a

Cerebral aneurysms are pathological balloonings of blood vessels in the brain, commonly found in the arterial network at the base of the brain. Cerebral aneurysm rupture can lead to a dangerous medical condition, subarachnoid hemorrhage, that is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Effective evaluation and management of cerebral aneurysms is therefore essential to public health. The goal of treating an aneurysm is to isolate the aneurysm from its surrounding circulation, thereby preventing further growth and rupture. Endovascular treatment for cerebral aneurysms has gained popularity over traditional surgical techniques due to its minimally invasive nature and shorter associated recovery time. The hemodynamic modifications that the treatment effects can promote thrombus formation within the aneurysm leading to eventual isolation. However, different treatment devices can effect very different hemodynamic outcomes in aneurysms with different geometries.

Currently, cerebral aneurysm risk evaluation and treatment planning in clinical practice is largely based on geometric features of the aneurysm including the dome size, dome-to-neck ratio, and parent vessel geometry. Hemodynamics, on the other hand, although known to be deeply involved in cerebral aneurysm initiation and progression, are considered to a lesser degree. Previous work in the field of biofluid mechanics has demonstrated that geometry is a driving factor behind aneurysmal hemodynamics.

The goal of this research is to develop a more combined geometric/hemodynamic basis for informing clinical decisions. Geometric main effects were analyzed to quantify contributions made by geometric factors that describe cerebral aneurysms (i.e., dome size, dome-to-neck ratio, and inflow angle) to clinically relevant hemodynamic responses (i.e., wall shear stress, root mean square velocity magnitude and cross-neck flow). Computational templates of idealized bifurcation and sidewall aneurysms were created to satisfy a two-level full factorial design, and examined using computational fluid dynamics. A subset of the computational bifurcation templates was also translated into physical models for experimental validation using particle image velocimetry. The effects of geometry on treatment were analyzed by virtually treating the aneurysm templates with endovascular devices. The statistical relationships between geometry, treatment, and flow that emerged have the potential to play a valuable role in clinical practice.

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  • 2016

Fundamentals and Applications of N-pulse Particle Image Velocimetry-accelerometry: Towards Advanced Measurements of Complex Flows and Turbulence

Description

Over the past three decades, particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been continuously growing to become an informative and robust experimental tool for fluid mechanics research. Compared to the early stage

Over the past three decades, particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been continuously growing to become an informative and robust experimental tool for fluid mechanics research. Compared to the early stage of PIV development, the dynamic range of PIV has been improved by about an order of magnitude (Adrian, 2005; Westerweel et al., 2013). Further improvement requires a breakthrough innovation, which constitutes the main motivation of this dissertation. N-pulse particle image velocimetry-accelerometry (N-pulse PIVA, where N>=3) is a promising technique to this regard. It employs bursts of N pulses to gain advantages in both spatial and temporal resolution. The performance improvement by N-pulse PIVA is studied using particle tracking (i.e. N-pulse PTVA), and it is shown that an enhancement of at least another order of magnitude is achievable. Furthermore, the capability of N-pulse PIVA to measure unsteady acceleration and force is demonstrated in the context of an oscillating cylinder interacting with surrounding fluid. The cylinder motion, the fluid velocity and acceleration, and the fluid force exerted on the cylinder are successfully measured. On the other hand, a key issue of multi-camera registration for the implementation of N-pulse PIVA is addressed with an accuracy of 0.001 pixel. Subsequently, two applications of N-pulse PTVA to complex flows and turbulence are presented. A novel 8-pulse PTVA analysis was developed and validated to accurately resolve particle unsteady drag in post-shock flows. It is found that the particle drag is substantially elevated from the standard drag due to flow unsteadiness, and a new drag correlation incorporating particle Reynolds number and unsteadiness is desired upon removal of the uncertainty arising from non-uniform particle size. Next, the estimation of turbulence statistics utilizes the ensemble average of 4-pulse PTV data within a small domain of an optimally determined size. The estimation of mean velocity, mean velocity gradient and isotropic dissipation rate are presented and discussed by means of synthetic turbulence, as well as a tomographic measurement of turbulent boundary layer. The results indicate the superior capability of the N-pulse PTV based method to extract high-spatial-resolution high-accuracy turbulence statistics.

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  • 2018

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Improved techniques for cardiovascular flow experiments

Description

Aortic pathologies such as coarctation, dissection, and aneurysm represent a

particularly emergent class of cardiovascular diseases and account for significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. Computational simulations of aortic flows are

Aortic pathologies such as coarctation, dissection, and aneurysm represent a

particularly emergent class of cardiovascular diseases and account for significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. Computational simulations of aortic flows are growing increasingly important as tools for gaining understanding of these pathologies and for planning their surgical repair. In vitro experiments are required to validate these simulations against real world data, and a pulsatile flow pump system can provide physiologic flow conditions characteristic of the aorta.

This dissertation presents improved experimental techniques for in vitro aortic blood flow and the increasingly larger parts of the human cardiovascular system. Specifically, this work develops new flow management and measurement techniques for cardiovascular flow experiments with the aim to improve clinical evaluation and treatment planning of aortic diseases.

The hypothesis of this research is that transient flow driven by a step change in volume flux in a piston-based pulsatile flow pump system behaves differently from transient flow driven by a step change in pressure gradient, the development time being substantially reduced in the former. Due to this difference in behavior, the response to a piston-driven pump can be predicted in order to establish inlet velocity and flow waveforms at a downstream phantom model.

The main objectives of this dissertation were: 1) to design, construct, and validate a piston-based flow pump system for aortic flow experiments, 2) to characterize temporal and spatial development of start-up flows driven by a piston pump that produces a step change from zero flow to a constant volume flux in realistic (finite) tube geometries for physiologic Reynolds numbers, and 3) to develop a method to predict downstream velocity and flow waveforms at the inlet of an aortic phantom model and determine the input waveform needed to achieve the intended waveform at the test section. Application of these newly improved flow management tools and measurement techniques were then demonstrated through in vitro experiments in patient-specific coarctation of aorta flow phantom models manufactured in-house and compared to computational simulations to inform and execute future experiments and simulations.

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Date Created
  • 2015

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Particle image segmentation based on Bhattacharyya distance

Description

Image segmentation is of great importance and value in many applications. In computer vision, image segmentation is the tool and process of locating objects and boundaries within images. The segmentation

Image segmentation is of great importance and value in many applications. In computer vision, image segmentation is the tool and process of locating objects and boundaries within images. The segmentation result may provide more meaningful image data. Generally, there are two fundamental image segmentation algorithms: discontinuity and similarity. The idea behind discontinuity is locating the abrupt changes in intensity of images, as are often seen in edges or boundaries. Similarity subdivides an image into regions that fit the pre-defined criteria. The algorithm utilized in this thesis is the second category.

This study addresses the problem of particle image segmentation by measuring the similarity between a sampled region and an adjacent region, based on Bhattacharyya distance and an image feature extraction technique that uses distribution of local binary patterns and pattern contrasts. A boundary smoothing process is developed to improve the accuracy of the segmentation. The novel particle image segmentation algorithm is tested using four different cases of particle image velocimetry (PIV) images. The obtained experimental results of segmentations provide partitioning of the objects within 10 percent error rate. Ground-truth segmentation data, which are manually segmented image from each case, are used to calculate the error rate of the segmentations.

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Date Created
  • 2015

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Modeling cardiac function with particle image velocimetry

Description

The application of novel visualization and modeling methods to the study of cardiovascular disease is vital to the development of innovative diagnostic techniques, including those that may aid in the

The application of novel visualization and modeling methods to the study of cardiovascular disease is vital to the development of innovative diagnostic techniques, including those that may aid in the early detection and prevention of cardiovascular disorders. This dissertation focuses on the application of particle image velocimetry (PIV) to the study of intracardiac hemodynamics. This is accomplished primarily though the use of ultrasound based PIV, which allows for in vivo visualization of intracardiac flow without the requirement for optical access, as is required with traditional camera-based PIV methods.

The fundamentals of ultrasound PIV are introduced, including experimental methods for its implementation as well as a discussion on estimating and mitigating measurement error. Ultrasound PIV is then compared to optical PIV; this is a highly developed technique with proven accuracy; through rigorous examination it has become the “gold standard” of two-dimensional flow visualization. Results show good agreement between the two methods.

Using a mechanical left heart model, a multi-plane ultrasound PIV technique is introduced and applied to quantify a complex, three-dimensional flow that is analogous to the left intraventricular flow. Changes in ventricular flow dynamics due to the rotational orientation of mechanical heart valves are studied; the results demonstrate the importance of multi-plane imaging techniques when trying to assess the strongly three-dimensional intraventricular flow.

The potential use of ultrasound PIV as an early diagnosis technique is demonstrated through the development of a novel elasticity estimation technique. A finite element analysis routine is couple with an ensemble Kalman filter to allow for the estimation of material elasticity using forcing and displacement data derived from PIV. Results demonstrate that it is possible to estimate elasticity using forcing data derived from a PIV vector field, provided vector density is sufficient.

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Date Created
  • 2015

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Experimental study of the flow field in a model rotor-stator disk cavity using particle image velocimetry

Description

Modern day gas turbine designers face the problem of hot mainstream gas ingestion into rotor-stator disk cavities. To counter this ingestion, seals are installed on the rotor and stator disk

Modern day gas turbine designers face the problem of hot mainstream gas ingestion into rotor-stator disk cavities. To counter this ingestion, seals are installed on the rotor and stator disk rims and purge air, bled off from the compressor, is injected into the cavities. It is desirable to reduce the supply of purge air as this decreases the net power output as well as efficiency of the gas turbine. Since the purge air influences the disk cavity flow field and effectively the amount of ingestion, the aim of this work was to study the cavity velocity field experimentally using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Experiments were carried out in a model single-stage axial flow turbine set-up that featured blades as well as vanes, with purge air supplied at the hub of the rotor-stator disk cavity. Along with the rotor and stator rim seals, an inner labyrinth seal was provided which split the disk cavity into a rim cavity and an inner cavity. First, static gage pressure distribution was measured to ensure that nominally steady flow conditions had been achieved. The PIV experiments were then performed to map the velocity field on the radial-tangential plane within the rim cavity at four axial locations. Instantaneous velocity maps obtained by PIV were analyzed sector-by-sector to understand the rim cavity flow field. It was observed that the tangential velocity dominated the cavity flow at low purge air flow rate, its dominance decreasing with increase in the purge air flow rate. Radially inboard of the rim cavity, negative radial velocity near the stator surface and positive radial velocity near the rotor surface indicated the presence of a recirculation region in the cavity whose radial extent increased with increase in the purge air flow rate. Qualitative flow streamline patterns are plotted within the rim cavity for different experimental conditions by combining the PIV map information with ingestion measurements within the cavity as reported in Thiagarajan (2013).

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Date Created
  • 2013

Rapid Decompression of Dense Particle Beds

Description

Rapid expansion of dense beds of fine, spherical particles subjected to rapid depressurization is studied in a vertical shock tube. As the particle bed is unloaded, a high-speed video camera

Rapid expansion of dense beds of fine, spherical particles subjected to rapid depressurization is studied in a vertical shock tube. As the particle bed is unloaded, a high-speed video camera captures the dramatic evolution of the particle bed structure. Pressure transducers are used to measure the dynamic pressure changes during the particle bed expansion process. Image processing, signal processing, and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques, are used to examine the relationships between particle size, initial bed height, bed expansion rate, and gas velocities.

The gas-particle interface and the particle bed as a whole expand and evolve in stages. First, the bed swells nearly homogeneously for a very brief period of time (< 2ms). Shortly afterward, the interface begins to develop instabilities as it continues to rise, with particles nearest the wall rising more quickly. Meanwhile, the bed fractures into layers and then breaks down further into cellular-like structures. The rate at which the structural evolution occurs is shown to be dependent on particle size. Additionally, the rate of the overall bed expansion is shown to be dependent on particle size and initial bed height.

Taller particle beds and beds composed of smaller-diameter particles are found to be associated with faster bed-expansion rates, as measured by the velocity of the gas-particle interface. However, the expansion wave travels more slowly through these same beds. It was also found that higher gas velocities above the the gas-particle interface measured \textit{via} Particle Image Velocimetry or PIV, were associated with particle beds composed of larger-diameter particles. The gas dilation between the shocktube diaphragm and the particle bed interface is more dramatic when the distance between the gas-particle interface and the diaphragm is decreased-as is the case for taller beds.

To further elucidate the complexities of this multiphase compressible flow, simple OpenFOAM (Weller, 1998) simulations of the shocktube experiment were performed and compared to bed expansion rates, pressure fluctuations, and gas velocities. In all cases, the trends and relationships between bed height, particle diameter, with expansion rates, pressure fluctuations and gas velocities matched well between experiments and simulations. In most cases, the experimentally-measured bed rise rates and the simulated bed rise rates matched reasonably well in early times. The trends and overall values of the pressure fluctuations and gas velocities matched well between the experiments and simulations; shedding light on the effects each parameter has on the overall flow.

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Date Created
  • 2019