Matching Items (4)

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Foundations of Modern Business Structure

Description

Industry is changing. Businesses are plagued with problems of inefficiency, ineffectiveness, and waste. Many of these issues arise from some common mistakes within established management structures; these issues include lack

Industry is changing. Businesses are plagued with problems of inefficiency, ineffectiveness, and waste. Many of these issues arise from some common mistakes within established management structures; these issues include lack of expertise in leadership positions, lack of unity across the organization, and imbalance within the business. Using Information Measurement Theory, the Kashiwagi Solution Model, and leadership theories, this thesis presents a simple approach to creating a business structure through explaining the basic tenets of a successful modern business. It was determined that the first and most important task of a business is to set realistic long-term goals for the organization. This thesis proposes that the basic needs of a successful business also includes having the right individuals, team formation, positive leadership, and the proper alignment of resources. It was found that it is best to hire individuals that exhibit some Type A characteristics because those individuals are likely to effectively carry out the goals of the business. Forming these individuals into small teams increases their processing speeds and encourages a balance of accountability, innovative solutions, and a network of learning. Furthermore, consistent, positive leadership that lives the company culture is a key element to successfully maintaining the business vision and maximizing associate effectiveness. It was also determined that aligning the organization to work towards the business vision can be performed through implementing a flat structure, placing individuals in roles that maximize effectiveness, and establishing the right business goals so that there is a consistent business vision at all levels of the organization. This thesis also provides guidance on how to implement these tenets in a simple, dominant way. Ultimately, the four proposed tenets working in unison towards business goals can lead to a successful and adaptable modern business.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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A new foundation for the disciplines of philosophy and psychology: unification without consilience

Description

Do emotions help explain our behaviors? Can they condemn us, excuse us, orr mitigate our moral responsibility orr blameworthiness? Can they explain our rationality and irrationality, orr warrant such attributions?

Do emotions help explain our behaviors? Can they condemn us, excuse us, orr mitigate our moral responsibility orr blameworthiness? Can they explain our rationality and irrationality, orr warrant such attributions? Can they be justified orr warranted? Are they constitutive aspects of our consciousness, identity, characters, virtues, orr epistemic status? The answer to these questions, at least to a significant extent, depends on what emotions are. This illustrates the importance of what emotions are to academics across multiple disciplines, as well as to members of governing bodies, organizations, communities, and groups. Given the great importance of emotions to various aspects of our lives, this dissertation is about the relevance of the topic of emotion as an area of study for the discipline of philosophy. This dissertation is also broadly about the need to bridge the interests, concerns, and collective bodies of knowledge between various distinct disciplines, thereby contributing to the process of unifying knowledge across the various disciplines within the realm of academia.

The primary aim in this dissertation is to initiate the unification of the interests, concerns, and collective bodies of knowledge across disciplines of academia. To do so, however, this dissertation aims to bridge some disciplinary divides between the disciplines of philosophy and psychology. I fulfill this aim by first demonstrating that interdisciplinary research and theorizing is needed within the disciplines of philosophy and psychology. I do this by considering how the problem of skepticism arises within these two disciplines. I also derive, propose, and argue for the acceptance of a new foundation for academic research and theorizing in response to the problem of skepticism. I refer to my proposal, in general, as The Proposal for Unification without Consilience (UC).

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Date Created
  • 2014

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The effect of cracks on unsaturated flow and volume change properties of expansive clays and impacts on foundation performance

Description

The primary objective of this study is to understand the effect of soil cracking on foundation performance for expansive soil profiles. Two major effects of cracks were studied to assess

The primary objective of this study is to understand the effect of soil cracking on foundation performance for expansive soil profiles. Two major effects of cracks were studied to assess the effect of cracks on foundation performance. First, the effect of cracks on soil volume change response was studied. Second, the effect of cracks on unsaturated flow properties and extent and degree of wetting were evaluated. Multiple oedometer-type pressure plate tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of cracks on soil properties commonly used in volume change (heave) analyses, such as swell pressure, soil water characteristic curve (SWCC), and swell potential. Additionally, the effect of cracks on saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity was studied experimentally to assess the impact of cracks on properties critical to evaluation of extent and degree of wetting. Laboratory experiments were performed on both intact and cracked specimen so that the effect of cracks on behavior could be benchmarked against intact soil response. Based on laboratory observations, the SWCC of a cracked soil is bimodal. However, this bimodal behavior is only observed in the very low suction ranges. Because the bimodal nature of the SWCC of cracked clays is only distinguishable at extremely low suctions, the bimodal behavior is unlikely to have engineering significance when soils remain unsaturated. A "lumped mass" parameter approach has been studied as a practical approach for modeling of cracked soils for both fluid flow and volume change determination. Laboratory unsaturated flow experiments were simulated using a saturated-unsaturated flow finite element code, SVFlux, to back-analyze unsaturated hydraulic conductivity functions for the subject soils. These back-analyzed results were compared to the results from traditionally-applied analyses of the laboratory instantaneous profile tests on intact and cracked specimens. Based on this comparison, empirical adjustments were suggested for modeling "lumped mass" cracked soil behavior in numerical codes for fluid flow through cracked soils. Using the empirically adjusted flow parameters for unsaturated flow modeling, example analyses were performed for slab-on-grade problems to demonstrate the impact of cracks on degree and extent of wetting under unsaturated and saturated flow conditions for different surface flux boundary conditions.

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Date Created
  • 2011

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Advancing upstream: philanthropy's aspirations for social justice

Description

This study explores how grantmakers conceptualize their work with respect to issues of social justice. It seeks to answer two primary questions: What role, if any, does the philanthropic

This study explores how grantmakers conceptualize their work with respect to issues of social justice. It seeks to answer two primary questions: What role, if any, does the philanthropic community ascribe to itself in not just ameliorating but helping solve our greatest social challenges? And if philanthropy does see itself as an agent of change, what are the barriers that limit its potential? After painting a portrait of contemporary American philanthropy, this paper applies Iris Marion Young's critique of distributive justice to philanthropy's dilemma between downstream charitable aid and upstream structural change. The thesis then turns to analysis of semi-structured interviews with eighteen of Arizona's foundation leaders to assess whether and how state-level philanthropic leaders see their work vis-á -vis social justice, and understand how external factors limit philanthropy's ability to effect maximum social change. Participants express a desire to engage in genuinely meaningful philanthropy which does more than just maintain the status quo, but identify multiple constraints, including legal barriers to fully utilizing advocacy as a tool, governmental infringement on philanthropic autonomy, the channeling of philanthropic resources toward basic needs as a result of the recession, and a grantmaking orientation that prioritizes short term programs that yield swift, measurable results as opposed to longer term efforts.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011