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A Qualitative Analysis on Maternal Interference and Infant Affect

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There is significant amount of research suggesting that high maternal interference can cause low infant emotion regulation, where the infant is unlikely to develop socially acceptable self-regulation mannerisms. Inculcating these

There is significant amount of research suggesting that high maternal interference can cause low infant emotion regulation, where the infant is unlikely to develop socially acceptable self-regulation mannerisms. Inculcating these vital emotion regulation behaviors early on is critically important for dealing with daily stressors in adulthood and many children who cannot do this may develop anxiety and severe mental health issues. Since mothers are the primary caregivers, it would greatly behoove them to encourage their children to use these emotion regulation behaviors when need be. In an effort to examine the dimensions of maternal interference and infant self-regulation, this study was created with the main purpose of understanding if there's a significant relationship between the type of maternal interference (passive vs. active) and the infant's self-comforting behavior. Instances of self-comforting behavior and active and passive maternal interference were counted for in 68 home visit videos from the larger Las Madres Nuevas longitudinal study. The statistical analyses, such as Pearson's correlation coefficients and multiple regression analysis, were conducted using Excel. While the Pearson's correlation coefficients (0.304 for passive and 0.815 for active) and R2 (0.09 for passive and 0.65 for active) suggested that active maternal interference can largely affect infant emotion regulation more so than passive maternal interference, the standard error of regression values (0.58 for passive and 1.97 for active) implied that the passive interference model more precisely fit the data than the active interference model. Thus, the hypothesis was partially supported in this study since not all statistics conveyed maternal interference does affect infant emotion regulation more than passive maternal interference.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05