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33 Buckets: Implementation of a Novel Water Distribution System

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Access to clean water is an issue that abounds in many areas across the world. It is estimated that over 770 million people lack access to improved sources of water. However, the lack of access to clean water does not

Access to clean water is an issue that abounds in many areas across the world. It is estimated that over 770 million people lack access to improved sources of water. However, the lack of access to clean water does not just affect people's health; it is a problem that affects three major areas. Because people do not have clean drinking water, millions of school days are missed per year due to water-related disease or children being forced to procure clean water. Also, gender inequalities result from women bearing the majority of the responsibility of walking long distances to find a source of potable water. Therefore, lack of access to clean water affects people's health, their education, and gender equality. The problem is not that there is a lack of technologies to provide clean water; the problem is that these technologies are not being implemented sustainably in the areas that need them most. To bring better access of clean water to people in developing nations, 33 Buckets has designed a distribution platform that uses schools as the central point for water distribution to local communities. A sustainable filtration system will be installed at the school to provide clean water for the people at the school. People in the nearby community will also be able to get free water if they bring their own containers to the school. To maintain the filter and provide it with any repairs that are necessary, water will be sold to nearby businesses lower than the current market prices. These profits will be used to ensure the quality of the filtration system and also to provide educational improvements to the school. An advisory committee made up of men and women will be assembled to run the filtration business and handle the finances. A pilot project to implement this model has been identified as the Rahima Hoque Girls School in rural Bangladesh. The team will travel to Bangladesh in Summer 2014 to install a filter at the school, purchase water testing supplies and containers, and meet with the advisory committee to go over final logistical details. Financial projections show that if the filter operates at 50% of its expected frequency and water is sold 5 days a week for 52 weeks, the school will generate $33,532.31. These profits are more than enough to maintain the system and pay for educational improvements to the school. Once implementation of the site is completed, the project will be monitored to track how the water selling business is operating. If the model is shown to be successful, it can then be scaled to other nearby schools or other countries with water contamination problems.

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2014-05

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Project Build-A-Hero: Enhancing Biomedical Engineering as a Socially Relevant Discipline

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The goal of this research study was to empirically study a poster-based messaging campaign in comparison to that of a project-based learning approach in assessing the effectiveness of these methods in conveying the scope of biomedical engineering to upper elementary

The goal of this research study was to empirically study a poster-based messaging campaign in comparison to that of a project-based learning approach in assessing the effectiveness of these methods in conveying the scope of biomedical engineering to upper elementary school students. For the purpose of this honors thesis, this research paper specifically reflects and analyzes the first stage of this study, the poster-based messaging campaign. 6th grade students received socially relevant messaging of juniors and seniors at ASU achieving their biomedical aspirations, and received information regarding four crucial themes of biomedical engineering via daily presentations and a website. Their learning was tracked over the course of the weeklong immersion program through a pre/post assessment. This data was then analyzed through the Wilcoxon matched pairs test to determine whether the change in biomedical engineering awareness was statistically significant. It was determined that a poster-based messaging campaign indeed increased awareness of socially relevant themes within biomedical engineering, and provided researchers with tangible ways to revise the study before a second round of implementation. The next stage of the study aims to explain biomedical engineering through engaging activities that stimulate making while emphasizing design-aesthetic appeal and engineering habits of mind such as creativity, teamwork, and communication.

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2016-05