Matching Items (5)

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Heart Rate Variability and Electrocardiography in Evaluating Stress

Description

Chronic stress has been linked as a probable contributor to a number of health problems that plague the world today. Obesity, cardiovascular disease, depression, and osteoporosis are all common health

Chronic stress has been linked as a probable contributor to a number of health problems that plague the world today. Obesity, cardiovascular disease, depression, and osteoporosis are all common health risks believed to be exacerbated by stress. While it is nether realistic nor desirable to completely eliminate stress in an individual, proper stress management is important to a healthy lifestyle. Homeostasis is the primary mechanism by which stress, and the stress response, should be analyzed. Environmental factors known as stressors elicit responses from the body, which can be measured in terms of duration and magnitude. These two factors determine the homeostatic response from the body. This thesis proposes the study of heart rate variability (HRV) to measure the response of the autonomic nervous system through time domain analysis (the length of interbeat intervals) and frequency domain analysis (the differences between the lengths of consecutive interbeat intervals). Even with many possible problems, this data still represents valuable proof of concept that HRV analysis may be of use in identifying stress.

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  • 2012-05

Parental Overprotection and Temperamental Negative Affectivity as Predictors of Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in Young Adulthood

Description

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and classic risk factors only predict half of the variance of cases. In this study, parental overprotection and

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and classic risk factors only predict half of the variance of cases. In this study, parental overprotection and temperamental negative affectivity both significantly correlated with blood pressure and heart rate, which suggests the importance of examining early life factors when determining one's risk for CVD.

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  • 2013-05

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The Effect of Exercise Therapy on Cognitive Function in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

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This study examines the effect of exercise therapy on a stationary bike on cognitive function, specifically inhibition and set-switching, in adolescents with Down syndrome. 44 participants were randomly divided between

This study examines the effect of exercise therapy on a stationary bike on cognitive function, specifically inhibition and set-switching, in adolescents with Down syndrome. 44 participants were randomly divided between the voluntary cycling therapy group (VCT) (i.e., self-selected cadence), assisted cycling therapy group (ACT) (i.e., 30% faster than self-selected cadence accomplished by a motor), and a control group (NC) in which the participants did not undergo any exercise therapy. Both cycling groups rode a stationary bicycle, for 30 minutes, three times a week, for eight-weeks. At the beginning (i.e., pretest) and end (i.e., posttest) of the eight-week session the participants completed tasks to evaluate their cognitive function. They completed three trials of the card sort test (i.e., set-switching) and three trials of the knock-tap test (i.e, inhibition) before and after eight-weeks of cycling therapy. The scores of these tests were analyzed using one-way ANOVA between groups and paired samples t-tests. The results showed that after eight-weeks of cycling therapy the participants in the VCT group performed worse in the knock-tap test, but improved in two trials of the card sort test. The results also showed that the participants in the ACT group performed worse after eight-weeks of exercise therapy in one trial of the card sort test. No significant changes were seen for the control group. Due to the fact that on average the participants in the VCT group cycled with a higher heart rate, our results suggest exercise that significantly elevates heart rate can improve cognitive function, specifically set-switching, in adolescents with Down syndrome.

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  • 2015-05

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Modeling Health Indicators of Arizona State's Women's Soccer Team

Description

Winning records are critical to a team's morale, success, and future. As such, players need to perform their best when they are called into a game to ensure the best

Winning records are critical to a team's morale, success, and future. As such, players need to perform their best when they are called into a game to ensure the best possible chance of contributing to the team's success. During the 2013 fall season of Arizona State's NCAA soccer team, twenty-five females had quantities measured, such as heart rate workload, weight loss and playing time, that were analyzed using a least squares regression line and other mathematical relationships with mathematical software. Equations and box plots were produced for each player in the hopes that the coaches could tailor practices to the athletes' bodies needs to increase performance and results for the upcoming fall 2014 season. The playing time and heart rate workload model suggests that increased playing time increases heart rate workload in a linear fashion, though the increase varies by player. The model for the team proposes that the heart rate workload changes in response to playing time according to the equation y=2.67x+127.41 throughout the season. The weight loss and heart rate workload model suggest that establishing a relationship between the two variables is complex since the linear and power regression models did not fit the data. Future studies can focus on the Rate of Perceived Exertion scale, which can supplement the heart rate workload and provide valuable information on players' fatigue levels.

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  • 2014-05

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The use of heart rate to estimate metabolic rate in the early embryonic stages of the Eastern Fence Lizard, Sceloporus undulates

Description

There are numerous strategies for determining an organism's metabolic rate, one of which is the heart rate method. The heart rate method is based on a relationship between an organism's

There are numerous strategies for determining an organism's metabolic rate, one of which is the heart rate method. The heart rate method is based on a relationship between an organism's heart rate and its oxygen consumption (V(O2)). Although validations of the heart rate method have focused on adult animals, researchers could benefit from applying this method to embryonic animals. In this study, the heart rate's reliability as an indicator of oxygen consumption in early stage embryos of reptiles (or more specifically, lizards) is evaluated. The focus is primarily on the earliest stages of cardiovascular detection. The results suggest that while it may be possible to use a reliable heart rate method to find an accurate value for oxygen consumption of a group of early embryos in lizards if the oxygen pulse can be accurately identified, it is more likely that in the earliest stages of cardiovascular development, the heart rate cannot serve as a reliable indicator of V(O2) because it may not be the primary manner in which oxygen is distributed in Sceloporus undulatus.

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  • 2013-05